Do the Right Thing: The People's Economist Speaks

Front Cover
Hoover Press, 1995 - 184 pages
Nationally syndicated columnist Walter E. Williams is chairmain of the economic department at George Mason University. This thought-provoking book contains nearly one hundred of William's most popular essays on race and sex, government, education, environment and health, law and society, international politics, and other controversial topics.

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Contents

Race Sex
1
Government
39
Education
81
The Environment Health
97
The International Scene
127
The Law Society
143
Potpourri
173
Copyright

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Page 76 - The powers delegated by the proposed constitution to the federal government, are few and defined. Those which are to remain in the state governments, are numerous and indefinite. The former will be exercised principally on external objects, as war, peace, negotiation, and foreign commerce ; with which last the power of taxation will, for the most part, be connected. The powers reserved to the several states will extend to all the objects, which, in the ordinary course of affairs, concern the lives,...
Page 14 - He has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating its most sacred rights of life and liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him. captivating and carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere, or to incur miserable death in their transportation thither.
Page 89 - States and the well-being of its people, the educational foundations of our society are presently being eroded by a rising tide of mediocrity that threatens our very future as a Nation and a people.
Page 40 - See if the law takes from some persons what belongs to them, and gives it to other persons to whom it does not belong. See if the law benefits one citizen at the expense of another by doing what the citizen himself cannot do without committing a crime.
Page 15 - I can only say, that there is not a man living, who wishes more sincerely than I do to see a plan adopted for the abolition of it ; but there is only one proper and effectual mode by which it can be accomplished, and that is by legislative authority ; and this, as far as my suffrage will go, shall never be wanting.
Page 41 - I am not among those who fear the people. They, and not the rich, are our dependence for continued freedom. And to preserve their independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our election between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude.
Page 15 - The contempt we have been taught to entertain for the blacks, makes us fancy many things that are founded neither in reason nor experience; and an unwillingness to part with property of so valuable a kind will furnish a thousand arguments to show the impracticability or pernicious tendency of a scheme which requires such a sacrifice.
Page 53 - ... when and to the degree the actor reasonably believes the force is immediately necessary to protect himself against the peace officer's (or other person's) use or attempted use of greater force than necessary.
Page 14 - And when the Almighty shall have blest us, and made us a people dependent only upon him, then may our first gratitude be shown by an act of continental legislation, which shall put a stop to the importation of Negroes for sale, soften the hard fate of those already here, and in time procure their freedom.

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