The Writings of Thomas Jefferson: Correspondence, cont

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Taylor & Maury, 1853

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Page 239 - Fix reason firmly in her seat, and call to her tribunal every fact, every opinion. Question with boldness even the existence of a God ; because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blindfolded fear.
Page 7 - I think by far the most important bill in our whole code, is that for the diffusion of knowledge among the people. No other sure foundation can be devised for the preservation of freedom and happiness.
Page 319 - What signify a few lives lost in a century or two? The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time, with the blood of patriots and tyrants.
Page 330 - Let me add, that a bill of rights is what the people are entitled to against every government on earth, general or particular; and what no just government should refuse, or rest on inference.
Page 345 - I have the honour to be your Excellency's most obedient and most humble servant, JOHN ANDRE.
Page 8 - Preach, my dear Sir, a crusade against ignorance. Establish and improve the law for educating the common people. Let our countrymen know that the people alone can protect us against these evils, and that the tax which will be paid for this purpose is not more than the thousandth part of what will be paid to kings, priests, and nobles, who will rise up among us if we leave the people in ignorance.
Page 100 - The basis of our governments being the opinion of the people, the very first object should be to keep that right; and were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter. But I should mean that every man should receive those papers and be capable of reading them.
Page 29 - I could not judge what effect it might have on our credit, and was not authorized, either to approve or disapprove of the transaction. I have since reflected on this subject ; if there be a danger that our payments may not be punctual, it might be better that the discontents which would thence arise, should be transferred from a Court, of whose good will we have so much need, to the breasts of a private company.
Page 106 - I never will have any. But I have had great opportunities of knowing the character of the people who inhabit that country ; and I will venture to say...
Page 116 - The torpitude of digestion a little passed, she flutters half an hour through the streets, by way of paying visits, and then to the spectacles. These finished, another half hour is devoted to dodging in and out of the doors of her very sincere friends, and away to supper. After supper, cards ; and after...