No Greater Threat: America After September 11 and the Rise of a National Security State

Front Cover
Algora Publishing, 2007 - 536 pages
A pertinent analysis of the "USA Patriot Act," based on meticulous legal research and straight talk, points to America's ominous evolution into a national security state. "In this very important study, C. W. Michaels gives us a unique guide and commentar.

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Contents

The USA PATRIOT ACT Titles I Through III
43
The USA PATRIOT ACT Titles IV Through VI
119
The USA PATRIOT ACT Titles VII Through X
157
Domestic Security Enhancement Act of 2003 Proposed
211
The First Six Elements of a National Security State
229
The Next Six Elements of a National Security State
359
The National Security State Scorecard a Possible Future Overall Cultural Themes
473
Closing Observations and the Need for Watchfulness
503
Index
525
Books and Recommended Reading
529
Copyright

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Page 37 - When a nation is at war many things that might be said in time of peace are such a hindrance to its effort that their utterance will not be endured so long as men fight, and that no court could regard them as protected by any constitutional right.
Page 37 - The question in every case is whether the words used are used in such circumstances and are of such a nature as to create a clear and present danger...
Page 399 - A world where some live in comfort and plenty, while half of the human race lives on less than $2 a day, is neither just nor stable.
Page 147 - [A] warrant is not required to break down a door to enter a burning home to rescue occupants or extinguish a fire, to prevent a shooting or to bring emergency aid to an injured person. The need to protect or preserve life or avoid serious injury is justification for what would be otherwise illegal absent an exigency or emergency.
Page 397 - America is now threatened less by conquering states than we are by failing ones. We are menaced less by fleets and armies than by catastrophic technologies in the hands of the embittered few.
Page 397 - The United States possesses unprecedented — and unequaled — strength and influence in the world. Sustained by faith in the principles of liberty, and the value of a free society, this position comes with unparalleled responsibilities, obligations, and opportunity. The great strength of this nation must be used to promote a balance of power that favors freedom.

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