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DRILL BIT TECHNOLOGY

Sandia National Laboratories financed the design and test of a new drill bit for intermediate hardness rock, as well as designed a diffusion bonding process for diamond cutters. Sandia developers transferred to a new company.

One example of the assorted drilling and logging technology developments accomplished through Sandia over the last 14 years is a polycrystalline diamond (PCD) compact drill bit. The PCD compact technology was developed by General Electric during the early 1970s with a primary application in machine tools. Sandia recognized this synthetic diamond technology in the middle 1970s as having a potential drill bit application. Sandia worked with G.E. in furthering the development of the PCD compacts themselves, developed a diffusion bonding process for reliably attaching the compacts to a steel or tungston carbide stud, developed design codes for optimally locating the PCD-faced studs on a drill bit face, and assembled a set of conceptual designs and specifications. Based upon these design specifications, Sandia transferred the technology by requesting from industry (through a funded request-for-proposal process) their best designs for this new concept. Sandia worked closely with companies having the winning proposals to give them the benefit of its design and test/evaluation facilities and experience. The result of this endeavor was that by the early 1980s up to fifteen bit companies (many of them small) were manufacturing and marketing this technology for use in sedimentary basins with soft to medium-hard formations. Tests and experience indicated that, on average, penetration rates were double those of the conventional, roller-cone bit technology. Today, every major bit manufacturer markets their version of this bit technology. When used in the appropriate formations, the technology alone can reduce total drilling costs by up to 10%. As the use of downhole drilling motor technology improves (high speed drilling) the PCD drill bit will become even more valuable. The projection of cost savings and/or recovered energy value returned over the next decade is conservatively estimated to be in the multibillion dollar range.

DOE - Sandia National Laboratories

FIELD NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS

The U.S. Geological Survey also developed and has patents on the high-resolution bore-hole gamma-ray spectrometer probe that has been adop ed by industry. The probe uses either a Californium-252 neutron source or miniature accelerator. The technique is described in a number of publications, but a particularly thorough review is given by F.E. Senftle, 1980, Application of gamma-ray spectral analysis to subsurface mineral application, in Short Course in Neutron Activation Analyses in the Geosciences (G.K. Muecke, editor): Mineralogical Association of Canada, p.211-254.

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ELECTRONIC IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM BENEFITS SHIPPING, RAIL AND VEHICLE
INDUSTRIES

THE TECHNOLOGY

Electronic identification was developed from research which initially began at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The original research conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory was funded by the Animal Plant Health Inspection Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The funded research was to provide the USDA with three interactive technologies, one of which was the electronic identification system. The system was developed to aid in obtaining unique, unambiguous, and computer compatible identification of animals without the need to restrain animals. THE TECHNOLOGY RECIPIENTS

AMTECH Corporation was formed to explore the potential industrial applications of the electronic identification system developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The corporation had its initial beginnings in the research and development project which began in 1972 at Los Alamos. The original technology was transferred from the Laboratory to AMTECH, with all patent rights becoming property of AMTECH in 1984. AMTECH has made significant technological changes to the original electronic identification system developed at Los Alamos so that it can be used by the cargo transport industries, specifically the maritime shipping industry, rail industry and vehicle industry.

USES AND BENEFITS

AMTECH's technology was named one of the 100 most significant technical developments by Industrial/Research Magazine in its prestigious IR-100 competition in 1978. AMTECH is able to custom-build its system to meet the specific needs of the customer. This type of interaction between supplier and consumer ensures that the user's needs are being met. Although there are other manufacturers of electronic identification systems, none of the current suppliers have been able to meet AMTECH's technology standards for commercial use of the system. AMTECH'S system has capabilities to long standoff requirements and rapid data acquisition, neither of which have been met by other system manufacturers. AMTECH'S system meets or exceeds most of the requirements for electronic identification applications needed in the transportation industry, both in U.S. and foreign markets. Because AMTECH is able to custom-build a system to meet the specific needs of a customer, the unit price of each system varies. AMTECH is currently in the development stage, and most revenues up to this point have been generated from the sale of test systems to industrial entities. The market outlook for AMTECH's electronic identification system is difficult to estimate, but from all indications, there is a strong market demand for AMTECH's technology. AMTECH currently employs 45 employees, and with the continued trend in growth, expectations are that AMTECH could employ as many as 100 employees by the end of 1988.

DOE - Los Alamos National Laboratory

FEDERAL LABORATORY CONSORTIUM FOR TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

"PUTTING TECHNOLOGY TO WORK"

If you would like more information regarding the FLC, please fill out the information below, carefully tear-out this page (or make a copy) and return it to the FLC Administrator's Office.

Yes, I would like' additional information on the FLC. Please add me to your general mailing list so that I may receive the Newsletters, meeting announcements and special mailings.

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FEDERAL LABORATORY CONSORTIUM FOR TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

"PUTTING TECHNOLOGY TO WORK"

If you would like more information regarding the FLC, please fill out the information below, carefully tear-out this page (or make a copy) and return it to the FLC Administrator's Office.

Yes, I would like additional information on the FLC.

Please add me to your general mailing list so that I may receive the Newsletters, meeting announcements and special mailings.

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FLC Administrator's Office
1945 N. Fine Avenue, Ste. #109

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Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer Pursuant to the Federal Technology Transfer Act of 1986

April 25, 1988

Report submitted by:

Dr. Eugene E. Stark, Jr.

Chairman

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The term "technology transfer" includes a range of formal and informal cooperations between Federal laboratories and US businesses, universities, State and local governments, and the Federal agencies. The purpose is to strengthen the nation's economy by enhancing the application of Federal laboratory technology and resources to these groups' needs and opportunities. Product improvement, service efficiencies, improved manufacturing processes, joint development to address government and private sector needs, and the development of major new products for the international marketplace, are examples of proven technology transfer results.

The Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer was organized in 1974 and formally chartered by the Federal Technology Transfer Act of 1986 to promote and to strengthen technology transfer nationwide. Its members include all major Federal laboratories and centers and their parent agencies.

In its first year under this Act, the Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) has made significant progress in building a stronger network of cooperation among the Federal laboratories and in enhancing technology transfer nationwide. Emphasis has been on developing person-to-person contacts that are essential to technical cooperation; on development and replication of promising models for technology transfer; on assistance to the laboratories and agencies; and on the promotion of nationwide technology-based cooperation.

Major accomplishments include:

• Development of a resource database and electronic mail infrastructure for inter

laboratory cooperation and communication;

• Establishing a Clearinghouse that assists American organizations in finding

specific laboratory technical contacts;
• Training of laboratory technology transfer personnel in skills required to develop

agreements permitted under the Technology Transfer Act;
Successful technology initiatives with industry, small business, universities, and

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