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S. HRG. 102-1048

U.S. REFUGEE PROGRAM FOR 1993:
ANNUAL REFUGEE CONSULTATIONS

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BEFORE THE

HEARING

APR - 6 1993
COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY

UNITED STATES SENATE

ONE HUNDRED SECOND CONGRESS

SECOND SESSION

ON

THE RECOMMENDATION OF THE ADMINISTRATION CONCERNING THE
ADMISSION OF REFUGEES INTO THE UNITED STATES FOR FISCAL
YEAR 1993

JULY 23, 1992

Serial No. J-102-74

Printed for the use of the Committee on the Judiciary

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For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office
Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402

ISBN 0-16-040236-0

COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY

JOSEPH R. BIDEN, JR., Delaware, Chairman EDWARD M. KENNEDY, Massachusetts STROM THURMOND, South Carolina HOWARD M. METZENBAUM, Ohio

ORRIN G. HATCH, Utah DENNIS DECONCINI, Arizona

ALAN K. SIMPSON, Wyoming PATRICK J. LEAHY, Vermont

CHARLES E. GRASSLEY, Iowa HOWELL HEFLIN, Alabama

ARLEN SPECTER, Pennsylvania PAUL SIMON, Illinois

HANK BROWN, Colorado HERBERT KOHL, Wisconsin

RONALD A. KLAIN, Chief Counsel

CYNTHIA C. HOGAN, Staff Director
THADDEUS E. STROM, Minority Chief Counsel and Staff Director

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93-241945

KF26

J8

1992 K

CONTENTS

STATEMENTS OF SENATORS

Kennedy, Hon. Edward M.

DeConcini, Hon. Dennis..

Thurmond, Hon. Strom..

Kassebaum, Hon. Nancy Landon.
Simpson, Hon. Alan K
Simon, Hon. Paul

1

2, 4, 7

11

17
53
58

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Page

234

236

American Council for Voluntary International Action:

Statement on domestic refugee resettlement in 1993
Statement of the private volunteer refugee resettlement agencies of the

Interaction Committee on Migration and Refugee Affairs
Resettlement as an instrument of protection: Traditional problems in achiev-

ing this durable solution and new directions in the 1990's, by the High

Commissioner....
White House memorandum, dated October 2, 1992, regarding determination

of fiscal year 1993 refugee admissions numbers and authorization of in-
country refugee status pursuant to sections 207 and 101(a)(42) respectively, of
the Immigration and Nationality Act .......

243

251

U.S. REFUGEE PROGRAM FOR 1993:
ANNUAL REFUGEE CONSULTATIONS

THURSDAY, JULY 23, 1992

UNITED STATES SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY,

Washington, DC The committee met, pursuant to notice, at 10:07 a.m., in room SD-226, Dirksen Senate Office Building, Hon. Edward M. Kennedy presiding

Present: Senators Kennedy, DeConcini, Simon, Simpson, and Grassley.

Staff present: Jerry M. Tinker, staff director, Subcommittee on Immigration and Refugee Affairs; Michael Myers, counsel; Richard Day, minority chief counsel; and Cordia Strom, minority counsel.

OPENING STATEMENT Senator KENNEDY. We will come to order. As we do each year, the committee meets today to review worldwide refugee programs and to set, under the terms of the Refugee Act of 1980, the number of refugees to be admitted to the U.S. during the coming year.

Despite the end of the cold war, we meet at a time when the plight and the needs of refugees have rarely been greater. Recently, I met with Ms. Ogata, the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees. She expressed her deep disappointment over what she had hoped would be a decade of repatriation had now turned into prolonged movements of new refugees.

As we all know, the end of the cold war has created new instability in which regional disputes and ethnic confrontations have created large numbers of additional refugees. There are now some 16 to 17 million refugees around the world. Every day, 5,000 refugees go home, but another 10,000 new refugees are created as conflicts continue in Yugoslavia, Somalia, Burma, and elsewhere. Europe itself is the scene of 2 million new refugees-men, women, and children fleeing indiscriminate shelling of their cities and towns in Yugoslavia, in a time of killing and devastation not seen since World War II.

The swift Allied military victory in Kuwait last year has nonetheless left millions of refugees in its wake-stateless Palestinians, Iraqis in Saudi Arabia, and millions of refugees and dislocated Kurds in northern Iraq.

The challenges today are great, but so are our means to meet them. We have an unprecedented opportunity to address refugee problems more effectively and with greater international coopera

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