Argument in the Greenhouse: The International Economics of Controlling Global Warming

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Taylor & Francis US, 1997 - 442 pages
How can greenhouse gases be controlled and reduced? Will it be in time?
This book adds a significant new contribution to the crucial climate change/global warming debate. Incorporating the key political and legal considerations into `real world' applied economic analysis, the authors provide a unique focus on the wider political economy of the problem.
All the key issues of controlling climate change (costs, timing and degree of stabilisation, ecological taxt reform, developing countries, and evolution of international agreements), are placed firmly within the current legal and political context, with state-of-the-art economic techniques introduced to analyse different policy proposals.
Covering both the developing and developed world, this book identifies important new policies to foster effective agreements on eissions and prevent global warming - realistic policies, likely to receive support at both international and domestic levels. be in time?
This book adds a significant new contribution to the crucial climate change/global warming debate. Incorporating the key political and legal considerations into 'real world' applied economic analysis, the book's authors provide a unique focus on the wider political economy of the problem.
All the key issues of controlling climate change (costs, timing and degree of stabilisation, ecological tax reform, developing countries and evolution of international agreements), are placed firmly within the current legal and political economy context, with state-of-the-art economic techniques introduced to analyse different policy proposals.
Covering both the developing and developed world, this book identifies important new policies to foster effective agreements on emmissions and prevent global warming - realistic policies which are likely to receive support at both international and domestic levels.

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Contents

II
3
III
19
V
45
IX
47
X
86
XI
109
XII
151
XIII
185
XIV
235
XVI
266
XVII
303
XVIII
328
XX
373
XXI
375
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About the author (1997)

Nick Mabey is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic Forecasting, London Business School; Stephen Hall is Professor of Economics, Imperial College; Clare Smith is a Consultant on energy and environmental issues; Sujata Gupta is a Research Fellow at the Tat Institute, India

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