Inside Organized Racism: Women in the Hate Movement

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University of California Press, 2003 M07 9 - 272 pages
Following up her highly praised study of the women in the 1920s Ku Klux Klan, Blee discovers that many of today's racist women combine dangerous racist and anti-Semitic agendas with otherwise mainstream lives. The only national sample of a broad spectrum of racist activists and the only major work on women racists, this important book also sheds light on how gender relationships shape participation in the movement as a whole.

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Contents

Crossing a Boundary
1
The Racist Self
25
Whiteness
54
Enemies
73
The Place of Women
111
A Culture of Violence
156
Lessons
187
Racist Groups
193
Methodology
198
Antiracist Organizations
205
Notes
207
Bibliography
247
Acknowledgments
267
Index
269
Copyright

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Page 218 - Ideology and Race in American History," in Region, Race, and Reconstruction: Essays in Honor of C. Vann Woodward, ed. J. Morgan Kousser and James M. McPherson (New York: Oxford University Press, 1982), 143-47.
Page 231 - Female Consciousness and Collective Action: The Case of Barcelona, 1910— 1918," Signs 7:3 (Spring 1981): 545-66.
Page 159 - For purposes of this essay, culture consists of such symbolic vehicles of meaning, including beliefs, ritual practices, art forms, and ceremonies, as well as informal cultural practices such as language, gossip, stories, and rituals of daily life.

About the author (2003)

Kathleen M. Blee is Professor of Sociology at the University of Pittsburgh. She is the author of Women of the Klan: Racism and Gender in the 1920s (California, 1991), editor of No Middle Ground: Women and Radical Protest (1998), coauthor of The Road to Poverty: The Making of Wealth and Hardship in Appalachia (2000), and coeditor of Feminism and Antiracism: International Struggles for Justice (2001).

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