Food Facts for Older Adults: Information on how to Use the Dietary Guidelines

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U.S. Department of Agriculture, Human Nutrition Information Service, 1993 - 68 pages

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Page 1 - Eat foods with adequate starch and fiber Avoid too much sugar Avoid too much sodium If you drink alcoholic beverages, do so in moderation Eat a variety of foods Maintain healthy weight Choose a diet low in fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol...
Page 17 - A Closer Look at Fat and Added Sugars The small tip of the Pyramid shows fats, oils, and sweets. These are foods such as salad dressings, cream, butter, margarine, sugars, soft drinks, candies, and sweet desserts. Alcoholic beverages are also part of this ĦJK8j*./t\ group. These foods provide KL.* calories but few vitamins and minerals.
Page 16 - Meat, Poultry, Fish, Dry Beans, Eggs, & Nuts Group 2-3 SERVINGS Fruit Group 2-4 SERVINGS Bread, Cereal, Rice, & Pasta Group 6-11 SERVINGS SOURCE: US Department of Agricu1ture / US Department of Hea1th and Human Services Use the Food Guide Pyramid to help you eat better every day..
Page 37 - Our society's preoccupation with weight loss has created a multimillion-dollar industry that abounds with diet plans and claims. Some diet plans simply don't work at all, and others are harmful. Always seek the advice of your doctor or dietitian before you begin any special diet. Beware of diets that — • make unrealistic promises — for example, dramatic weight loss in a short period of time. • include fasting. • eliminate one food group completely or include only one or two food groups....
Page 5 - ... 2.17 Increase to at least 90 percent the proportion of school lunch and breakfast services and child care food services with menus that are consistent with the nutrition principles in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. (Baseline: 1 percent of schools offered lunches that provided an average of 30 percent or less of calories from total fat, and less than 1 percent offered lunches that provided an average of less than 10 percent of calories from saturated fat based on the 1992 School Nutrition...
Page 4 - The way diet affects blood cholesterol varies among individuals. However, blood cholesterol does increase in most people when they eat a diet high in saturated fat and cholesterol and excessive in calories. Of these, dietary saturated fat has the greatest effect; dietary cholesterol has less.
Page 8 - Sodium occurs naturally in most foods. It is also added to many foods and beverages, usually as salt. One teaspoon of salt contains about 2,000 milligrams of sodium. The body needs sodium to maintain normal blood volume and for the nerves and muscles. But, populations with diets high in salt have more high blood pressure, a condition that increases your risk for heart attack, stroke, and kidney disease. People with high blood pressure are usually advised to restrict their salt and sodium. It is also...
Page 10 - ... to add any more salt at all. • Use herbs and spices as seasonings for vegetables and meats instead of salt. • Taste your food before you salt it. Does it really need more salt? Try one shake instead of two. Gradually cut down on the amount of salt you use. Your taste will adjust to less salt. The following table will give you an idea of the amount of sodium in different types of food. Individual products vary. Information on food labels can also help you make choices to moderate your sodium...
Page 17 - Meat, Poultry, Fish, Dry Beans, Eggs, and Nuts 2-1/2 to 3 ounces of cooked lean meat, poultry, or fish Count 1/2 cup of cooked beans or 1 egg or 2 tablespoons of peanut butter as 1 ounce of lean meat (about 1/3 serving) Fats, Oils, and Sweets LIMIT CALORIES FROM THESE especially if you need to lose weight The amount you eat might be more than one serving.
Page 17 - Pyramid shows fats, oils, and sweets. These are foods such as salad dressings, cream, butter, margarine, sugars, soft drinks, candies, and sweet desserts. Alcoholic beverages are also part of this group. These foods provide calories but few vitamins and minerals. Most people should go easy on foods from this group. Some fat or sugar symbols are shown in the other food groups. That's to remind you that some foods in these groups can also be high in fat and added sugars — such as cheese or ice cream...

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