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The aircraft industry, the airlines, and federal and local governmental agencies face many problems (2) in continuing to

minimize the effect of aircraft noise and exhaust emissions on the environment. The present costly and time-consuming procedures for making progress demand the early development of significant advances in technology, and in the associated design and operation of quieter, cleaner engines and aircraft. To highlight the technical side of the story, we would like to re-emphasize some key considerations relative to the more serious problems that need urgent attention.

Trained personnel are in very short supply to support the increasing attention being given to all areas of noise reduction, aircraft noise being but a small portion of the whole. It is necessary to recognize applied acoustic engineering as a major technical discipline, and to establish adequate educational curricula and associated research facilities to produce qualified personnel in this field.

Acoustics research laboratory facilities are few and far between. The past development of sophisticated aerodynamic facilities, by government, industry, and educational institutions, is an example of the road we must follow promptly if we are to develop the broad information bank necessary for effective and efficient design of noise reduction concepts.

The field of acoustics research is wide open to improving understanding of the mechanics of noise, and to determining means of defining full-scale flight hardware from scale-model testing. The specific examples covered in this paper(2) demonstrate quite clearly that we have a long way to go in attaining this capability.

There is a critical need for a new high-bypass turbofan engine in the 20,000 to 30,000-pound thrust class, for use both in the continued production of current aircraft, and for

designing advanced technology aircraft of the future. The noise reduction benefits and performance improvements of such an engine are well recognized. However, it is unlikely that industry can proceed with development of such a commercial engine without government help such as that which has resulted in the past from the derivation of commercial engines from military predecessors.

The existence of airframe noise in the absence of engine noise must be given increased attention in establishing attainable noise levels for current and future aircraft. It has become apparent that a limit exists, beyond which quieting the engine installation will be ineffective unless progress is made toward cleaner aerodynamic design and/or cleaner operation of the aircraft.

The aircraft industry needs a reliable measure of noise acceptability for use in the initial planning and design of aircraft and engines. The very subjective nature of noise precludes basing design on the pure physics of noise alone. Yet introducing a new airplane into airline service requires major financial commitments by the manufacturer several years before airplane certification. One of the most important design parameters in future aircraft is its community noise acceptability when it enters service. The high economic penalties resulting from “overkill" in designing to unknown requirements are not tolerable.

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EL SEGUNDO DEMOCRATIC CLUB,
March 30, 1973.

DEAR SIRS: We would like to congratulate the residents of Inglewood and Westchester whose coordinated efforts have brought a measure of relief from the constant aggravation of the noise caused by airport operation. In the same vein, the members of the El Segundo Democratic club wish to protest the implementation of the new take off procedures which have caused a much higher level of aircraft noise to be inflicted on our community. Although the change in landing patterns obviously reduces the suffering of the residents of communities such as Inglewood and Westchester, we fail to see the necessity for installing take off procedures which call for steeper take off angles, thus requiring more power and generating more noise. A comparison with the former take off patterns should make the unpleasant consequences quite obvious. Formerly aircraft were quite a bit further down the runway before lifting off. Before lift off, much of the aircraft noise was muffled. After lift off, the aircraft would continue in a gradual climb well out over the ocean before making any maneuvers which would bring them back over our town.

The new procedure results in most aircraft becoming airborne before they reach the eastern limits of our populated areas. El Segundo is becoming more democratic in one respect. We are now all suffering equally from the noise. Furthermore, the altitude most aircraft achieve while flying past El Segundo only serves to distribute the noise over a wider area. Another unfortunate effect of this ability to achieve minimum altitude much sooner is the tendency of most aircraft to make turns in the direction of El Segundo long before they reach the coast, some we suspect, before they reach minimum altitude.

We ask your help to get us relief from this situation. We would like to you to explore the possibility of reinstituting the former take off procedure of gradual ascent out over the ocean before overflying our populated areas.

We have a beautiful park here in El Segundo. Perhaps we could expedite this proposal by making the next meeting of the committee an open air activity in our parks, where the problem which we are describing is all too obvious. EUGENE MOORE, Presdent.

APRIL 28, 1973.

Senator HOWARD W. CANNON: I, Lynn Jane Neumann, do swear under penalty of perjury, that the following letter of declaration is true to the best of my knowledge and wish it to be admitted into the noise hearings conducted by you and Senator Tunney.

LYNN JANE NEUMAN.

RANCHO MIRAGE, CALIF., April 28, 1973.

MY DEAR SENATOR CANNON: I would like to express my appreciation for your acceptance of my uninvited testimony before you, and Senator Tunney, at the "Noise Hearings," conducted at the Inglewood Fire Station. I am just now recuperating from the Easter week, spent in my apartment house under the north runway, in Inglewood, which sends me back to the desert with shattered nerves, upset stomach, and a poorer financial standing.

The personal, and damaging effects of the L.A.X., operations, are becoming more evident with every trip to Inglewood, and if something is not done immediately, we, under the north runway, can, and will become a carbon copy of the South runway environment!

My deluxe split level 2 B/R apt. that became vacant Feb. 1st is still vacant! I have advertised in two newspapers, and find we are at the stage where people aren't even looking in our prime apartment house, and residential area. I have lost $880.00, in income to date on this vacancy, and have no future prospects. While interviewing two girls, on Good Friday, the planes came over so hot and heavy between 6 and 8 p.m. I lost the girls because of the noise, and also the safety element, entered into it! One of the S. runways had been closed Thursday, so we were receiving all that traffic! This was an excellent indication of what will happen if the traffic were increased to that degree. We would be reduced to, "Red-Star Fertilizer!"

I depend upon my building for part of my income, to support myself and my 16-year-old son. I might add, I have never had a vacancy factor of more than two weeks in the four years I've had my building, and I'm sure my ex-husband before me, had none, because I have inherited some well-established tenants who are still there. I lost my ex-tenant, an F.B.I. agent, on the night narcotics division, because he could not sleep during the day because of the planes, and also thought the rent was too high for so much noise.

You can readily see if, L.A.X. is permitted to continue under its present procedure, it will not only pull our rent structure down, but also the quality of our tenants, in our super-deluxe buildings. My rents in some apts. are below what they should be, but retaining good tenants over a period of years, is more important to me. I am now starting to lose some of these old, desirable tenants, and finding it impossible to replace them.

This has happened to Lorraine Gerhardt, my good friend I spoke about that day and she now has lost her apt. house through foreclosure, Its not too late, to save us under the north runway, and these are some of the solutions! 1. Extend all runways out to ocean!

2. Over-ocean approaches and departures!

L.A.X.-F.A.A. and A.L.P.A. stated they would never consider this

With God's, help, and people power, the F.A.A. finally conceded last summer, to give these approaches, "a try," between 12 midnight and 7 a.m.

They proved successful, and will be in effect at the end of April, between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. except when wind exceed 10 knots.

Just think, Senator Cannon, for the 1st time in the annals of L.A.X. history, people will be able to sleep in Lennox and Inglewood! Our research brought out, these approaches take more gas, and time-a small price to pay for the Health, Welfare, and safety of thousands under the flight pattern.

I have a great deal of respect and admiration for L.A.X., manager Clifton Moore, for initiating this policy, that our Gov. should have done years ago. Its not often today that you see the strength of men shine through, as it did in this instance. These approaches should eventually, be on a full time scale, even tho a few flights may have to be cut out. However, Senator Cannon, more must be done, and I repeat, before its too late. Our Government, has never considered, or protected our rights on the ground, and its long overdue.

I look to you for this strength! 90% of the schools in Lennox and 80% in Inglewood, are under the flight pattern. It is criminal and unjust, what is happening, not only to the education of our children, but their hearing!

An all time and permanent solution to the L.A.X. problem, is the "OFF-SHORE AIRPORT." I will be more than happy to send you these plans upon request. To go one step further, is to build a nuclear plant underneath the airport, that would provide us with the first failsafe plant ever to be built. Safety devices could be built in to flood the chamber where that golf-ball size of energy is placed, in case of earthquake or explosion.

At present, San Orfro is not only endangering Nixon's life while he is at San Clemente, but hundreds of thousands of lives within a 50-mile radius of the fallout, if anything should happen at that location. There is NO working model of San Orfro, so wouldn't it be wise, as well as economical, to kill two birds with one stone rather than have another Hiroshima?

The Edison Co. could share the cost of building the off-shore airport and gain a new plant that they have been pleading for.

You, Senator Cannon, now have a choice to go down in history as a great man of decision, as a few men who have changed the course of history have, or you can make a non-plus decision that will keep the people's interest on a diminishing basis.

An airport, and people, can and will live compatibly, only if directed on the right course.

May God direct you in all your decisions.

LYNN JANE NEUMANN, Advisor to S.T.O.P. Committee, "Stop the Overhead Planes."

STATEMENT OF HIGHLINE PUBLIC SCHOOLS, SEATTLE, WASH.

Schools located in the vicinity of airports, and particularly those which are more or less directly underneath air traffic paths, suffer repeated intrusion from aircraft noise. These intrusions have been found to be interruptive and

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deleterious to classroom procedure, and sufficiently serious to cause the Highline District to undertake noise surveys of impacted schools. The remediation of the problems identified during these in-depth studies focused upon remedial construction of the school buildings, hoping thereby to reduce external noise infractions and allow uninterrputed classroom activity.

In a presentation to the Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Noise Abatement and Control in San Francisco, California, September 27, 1971, Mayor Wes Uhlman of Seattle stated:

"I am also suggesting that Seattle and its environs have very typical noise problems. Our major airport has an average of 220 flights a day during daylight hours... Noise peaks at the airport affecting residences are measured in the 95-100 dBA levels. In both cases, the most disturbing feature is the intermittent intrusions: on the freeway it is a roaring truck, and at the airport it is the shattering impact of the low-flying jet. Aircraft noise makes communication impossible for up to 90 minutes of each school day in at least one school near our airport.

"Ironically, much of this blight of the human environment in our city comes as a legacy of the generosity of the federal government. Our highways, our airports and indeed all jet aircraft are heavily subsidized by the federal government . . . I note that in Los Angeles, airport commissioners have committed local funds of about $200 million to destroy 400 acres of residence which are blighted by aircraft noise. Nearly 2,000 homes will simply be demolished because the noise blight makes them unfit for human habitation."

The citizens of the Highline School District have a growing animosity about the effect of noise pollution, and share Mayor Uhlman's concern that much of the noise blight can be traced to the generosity of the federal government. The staff of the Highline School District shares this concern, particularly as it relates to the educational processes in the district schools. As a result, during December, 1969, the Board of Directors of the Highline School District instructed the staff to investigate the impact of airplane noise on school facilities and propose alternative solutions.

Beginning in January, 1970, meetings were held with Mr. Peter Breysse, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, concerning the noise problem in Highline. Mr. Breysse agreed to conduct some noise level readings to determine the severity of the problem in this school district. These noise level readings point to the severity of the noise intrusion problem in the schools of the Highline District.

HIGHLINE SCHOOL DISTRICT, RESULTS OF NOISE LEVEL INVESTIGATION-INSTRUCTIONAL TIME INTERRUPTIONS

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It is obvious from these findings that a great deal of instructional time is being lost in the school surrounding Seattle-Tacoma Airport. Further investigation has reported noise levels in excess of 100 dBA at times in school classrooms. The impact of these noise intrusions is an increasingly serious problem not only for the educational process but for the citizens that must live and work with these interruptions.

In an attempt to find assistance with the problem, staff members of the Highline School District have made the following contacts with agencies and individuals:

Facilities, Engineering & Construction Agency, Region X, H.E.W., Mr. Robert Mommsen, Regional Engineer.

U.S. Office of Education, Mr. Wm. McLaughlin, Regional Commissioner.
Environmental Protection Agency, Miss Anita Frankel, Seattle, Washington.
U.S. Office of Education, Region X, Director, Educational Research.

Public Health Service, Mr. John Moran.

Washington State University, School of Architecture, Mr. Dave Scott, Chair

man.

Federal Aviation Administration, Renton Office, Mr. Walter Stock.

Port of Seattle, Mr. Don Shay, Director of Aviation.

Health, Education and Welfare, Seattle Office, Mr. Doug Hanson.

Health, Education and Welfare, Administrator, San Francisco, Calif., Mr. Cy Everest, Regional Assistant.

Health, Education and Welfare, Dr. Alex Cohen, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Housing and Urban Development, Mr. George Winzar, Washington, D.C.

Bolt, Beranek and Newman, Inc., Acoustical Firm, Dr. Dwight Bishop, Los Angeles, Calif.

Bureau of Occupational Health & Safety, Mr. Alan Stevens, Cincinnati, Ohio. Bolt, Beranek & Newman, Inc., Acoustical Firm, Dr. Peter Franken, Cambridge, Mass.

Deasey & Bolling, Architects, Mr. Robert Bolling, Los Angeles, Calif.

Educational Facilities Laboratory, Mr. Alan Green, Secretary Treasurer, New York, New York.

Long Beach School District.

Los Angeles School District.

Boston School District.

Chicago School District.

Health, Education and Welfare, Mr. James Knockenhauer, Acting, Regional Environmental Control Director.

King County Executive, Mr. John Spellman.

Seattle Mayor Wes Uhlman's Office, Mr. King Lysen.

Office of Senator Warren G. Magnuson, U.S. Senate, Mr. Warren F. Reid, Washington, D.C.

Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Facilities Engineering & Construction Agency, Research and Development, Mr. Robert W. Blake, Director, Mr. Len Slagle, Senior Research Architect.

National Aeronautics & Space Admin., Washington, D.C. Mr. Roy P. Jockson, Assoc. Admin. for Advanced Research & Technology; Mr. Duff Ginter, Assistant.

Department of Health, Education & Welfare, Washington, D.C., Mr. Gerrit D. Fremouw, Director, Office of Facilities Engineering and Constuction Agency. Health, Education and Welfare, Office of Education, Mr. Glen C. Boerrigter, Chief, Applied Research Branch, Division of Research.

University of Washington, Mr. Kenneth D. Garrison, Chief Architect.

Industrial Noise Services, Inc., Palo Alto, California.

Department of Commerce, Economic Development Administration, Mr. Ken Latcholia, Mr. John Spivey.

Dept. of Health, Education & Welfare, Office of Federal Assisted Construction,
FECA, Mr. Benson L. Dutton, Director.

Federal Aviation Administration, Washington, D.C., Mr. Richard Skully, Direc-
tor, Office of Environmental Quality, Mr. Ray Shepanek, Assistant.
Office of Noise Abatement, Department of Transportation, Washington, D.C.,
Mr. Charles R. Foster, Director.

Of these agencies, the Educational Facilities Laboratory, New York, indicated an interest in assisting the school district by providing consultant help to assess the severity of the problem and begin exploring alternative solutions. A small grant to the Highline District has been made by E.F.L. with the express purpose of further research into the alleviation of the noise problem through construction alternatives. This study-to be completed by August of 1973-includes the following steps:

A. Simultaneous measurement within and without the classroom during numerous flyovers.

B. Measurement of the period of time during which sound levels in dBA exceeded predetermined, tolerable levels in order to estimate the amount of time lost due to inability to communicate.

C. Establishment of a tolerance noise criteria within the classroom, based upon the special noise climate requirement of each classroom.

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