Page images
PDF
EPUB

TABLE D.--NUMBER OF MIGRANT WORKERS AND DEPENDENTS

Under 1 year

[blocks in formation]

Male Female Total

Male Female Total

Male Female Total

Male Female Total

Male Female Total

Male Female

Total

Male Female

114

6
23
16

9
59
7

63

4
12
9
5
32
4

51

2
11
7
4
27
3

455 24 89 63 37 235 28

250 13 48 35 20 129 15

205

11
41
28
17
106
13

569

30
112
79
46
294
36

313 17 62 43 25 162 20

256 13 50 36 21 132 16

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

16 16

14 14

8 8

6 6

1 1

0 0

45 45

[ocr errors]

33

18

15

130

72

58

163

90

73

103

292

90

50

40

6

3

[blocks in formation]

County

Total

Box Elder
Cache.
Weber.
Davis.
Salt Lake
Utah.
Carbon
Juab.
Millard
Sanpete
Sevier
Piute
Washington
Iron
Wayne
San Juan

County

Total

2,277

120
446
315

185
1,175

35
50
65

Northern and north central:

Box Elder.
Cache
Weber.
Davis
Salt Lake

Utah..
Central and southern:

Carbon
Juab
Millard.
Sanpete.
Sevier.
Piute
Washington
Iron.
Wayne.
San Juan.

142
10
20
100
100

31
650

15
90
20

Total

5,695

150

906

1,864

828

847

1, 100

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

STATE OF WASHINGTON,

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH,

Olympia, Wash., December 21, 1967. Re migrant health in Washington State. Hon. Harrison WILLIAMS, Chairman, Migrant Health Subcommittee, New Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SENATOR WILLIAMS: Unmet health needs experienced by migrants have been recorded in detail, and are probably no different in Washington State than in any other area. A list of those needs would include, but not be limited to, the following: Medical care; dental care; family planning; immunizations; nutrition education; food preparation instruction.

These and other conditions are brought on, or contributed to, by: Too many communicable diseases; poor housing and sanitation; inadequate education; low income; language barriers; continual mobility; poor personal hygiene.

Each of these thirteen factors works to the disadvantage of the migrant and his family. Some are beyond the scope of the Migrant Health Act, but others, medical and dental care, case finding and disease prevention by public health nurses, and housing and basic sanitation techniques, are being attacked in Washington.

We view this only as a beginning. There are many migrants in Washington who have not yet been reached by any special services; and it is important that those areas with migrant health projects expand their activities.

The following is a list of health districts in Washington where significant num. bers of migrants are employed.

[merged small][subsumed][subsumed][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][merged small]

Reference to the above table of peak populations will indicate that the presently operating programs serve only a minority of the migrants. We estimate that the stay of migrant agricultural workers and their families amounts to some 110,000 person-months each year in the state as a whole, but only about 12,000 personmonths in Whatcom, Skagit and Pierce Counties, places where migrant programs at a fair level of intensity have been carried out. The present funding under the Migrant Health Act in these three counties, serving about one-ninth of the migrant need, is $118,496. To provide services at this intensity to the rest of the State would require then, as a rough estimate, some $1,060,000. To fill the total need, however, could require much more. The most intensive project in the state, the Puyallup-Stuck Valley Project, is funded at $40,324 to serve needs of migrants present for 1,600 person-months. To serve migrant needs in the state at this level would require about $2.8 million, and even then it is worth noting that the Puyallup-Stuck Valley migrants, mostly Indians, are eligible for considerable service elsewhere under other legislation.

The extent of need may be grasped by noting we forecast, very roughly, that some 246 children will be born to migrant families while they are in Washington during the 1968 scason; and that of these, a dozen will die during the first year, eight from preventable causes. About ninety-five adult migrants will also die.

The “poor health” syndrome of migrants is extremely difficult to meet. One of the most frustrating aspects of the picture is mobility. The health problems of a moving population are compounded by a here-today-gone-tomorrow culture which makes any service impossible to complete. The factor of mobility will be altered in the next few years as changes occur in agricultural economics and farm mechanization. In the meantime, we feel we must continue and expand our efforts to serve the migrant workers and their dependents who come to Washington.

A list of the current use of Migrant Health Act funds in Washington follows:

Migrant Health Act funds in Washington; total in 1968.

$160, 453 Washington State migrant health project (MG-145): Statewide

project providing consultant services in medical and dental care, nursing, sanitation, nutrition, and social work to local projects; coordination of services to migrants within the State; and stimulation of services in areas with large migrant populations. In addition, nursing care was provided in Yakima County and sanitation services were provided in Okanogan County..

41, 957 Whatcom County migrant health project (MG-132): Medical, dental, nursing care, and sanitation services..

23, 788 Skagit County migrant health project (MG-144): Medical, dental,

and nursing care, hospitalization, sanitation services, health education, and social services.

54, 384 Puyallup-Stuck Valley migrant health project (MG-19R): Medical and nursing care, sanitation services, and health education.

40, 324 (Application pending) Okanogan County migrant health project

(MG-11): (will function as a service component of the Washington State project). Medical, dental and nursing care, and sanitation services..

1 24, 695 Not incl inuded total. Sincerely,

BERNARD BUCOVE,

M.D., Director.

[ocr errors]

STATE OF WISCONSIN,
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES,

Madison, Wis., December 22, 1967.
Hon. HARRISON WILLIAMS,
Chairman, Migrant Health Subcommittee,
New Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SENATOR WILLIAMS: As Wisconsin's State Health Officer and Administrator of the Division of Health, Department of Health and Social Services, I would like to go on record in support of bill S. 2688 relating to the extension of the Migratory Health Act.

The migrant worker is a prototype group which is under-educated with respect to health, insulated by language from the culture which surrounds him, unable to afford major expenses, and kept by his tradition and work from the beneficial habits of hygiene and nutrition. If the health of this group is to be improved during the agricultural and food-processing season in Wisconsin then a continuation of the Migrant Health Act is necessary.

During the past four years migrant grants have enabled local communities to expand health services for the migrants in Wisconsin. Even though these projects are making progress in the health status and personal health practices of the migrant workers and their families, the number they reach is pitifully small.

Reports received from the projects show an increase in the utilization of medical and dental services over the past years. During the 1967 fiscal year 1,909 migrants made 3,403 medical and dental visits to the family health clinics. This represents only 7.7 percent of the migrant population receiving medical and dental services. This means that approximately 93 percent of the migrant population did not or could not obtain the necessary health services needed.

The enclosed report of the utilization of the Wisconsin Migrant Health Services
will substantiate the need for an extension of, and an increase in, funds for the
Migrant Health Act.
Sincerely,

E. H. JORRIS, M.D.,

State Health Officer. A BRIEF REPORT OF WISCONSIN'S MIGRANT HEALTH PROGRAM, 1967 There are six areas of concentration of migrants in the State of Wisconsin, covering 30 counties. There were approximately 12,000 migratory workers employed during the seasonal agricultural and food-processing activities in

Wisconsin during 1967. The total estimated migratory population during the peak season was 24,767.

ESTIMATED POPULATION, 1967
(During Agricultural and Food-Processing Season]

[blocks in formation]

There are five formal Migrant Health Projects in the State of Wisconsin. Three (3) are supported by local, state and federal funds; and two (2) are voluntary programs supported locally.

The three health projects which are assisted by federal funds are those in Endeavor, operated by the Catholic Diocese of Madison; in Beaver Dam, operated by St. Joseph's Hospital; and in Wautoma, operated by the Waushara County Committee for Economic Opportunity. These programs were awarded a total sum of $60,845 by the Public Health Service for the fiscal year July 1, 1967-June 30, 1968.

The federal funds authorized under the Migrant Health Act were used to continue and expand the medical and dental care programs, nursing services, inhospital care, sanitation services, and health education for migrant agricultural workers and their families in the project areas.

The migrant allotment by project and compared with past fiscal years is as follows:

[blocks in formation]

The two voluntary health projects are: the Oconto program, operated by voluntary groups from Oconto and Oconto Falls; and the Door County program, operated by voluntary groups and sponsored by the Catholic Apostolate of the Green Bay Diocese. The counties served by UMOS received no formal health services.

The migrant projects in Wisconsin were awarded $13,200 (which was included in the total $60,845 grant) for hospitalization. Of this sum, $9,600 was allocated for in-hospital care and $3,600 for physician in-hospital services.

[blocks in formation]

During the fiscal year July 1, 1966-June 30, 1967 the health care services (medical and dental), and for the first time in-patient hospitalization, was made available to 24,767 migrant people.

Of the total 'migrant population (24,767) only 1,538 received medical services. Approximately six percent received some type of medical services and 23,229 migrants (94% of pop.) did not receive any medical care.

Dental care was given to only 371 migrants, 1.7 percent of the total population. Eighty-four percent (84.0%) of those who received dental care were children

« PreviousContinue »