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ALABAMA
Summary of Projected Program Activities

FY 1968

1. Manpower Needs and Employment Opportunities

A manpower survey made of the employment needs and opportunities by the Alabama State Department of Education in cooperation with the State Chamber of Commerce, the Department of Industrial Relations, and the State Planning and Industrial Development Board. These surveys brought in 15,659 responses or 66.72 percent of the total. The manpower survey 18 summarized by county, State, and Industrial Code Classification systems.

2. Program Offerings

In each of the 66 counties there is a program of vocational agriculture and vocational home economics. There are 17 programs for persons with special needs, of which 14 are in trade and Industrial education. There are 46 area vocational schools in Alabama.

3. Program Priorities

High School If funds, personnel, and facilities were available, Alabama could initiate 800 additional vocational programs . It is expected that the State may add 40 new teachers to the area schools In which secondary students will enroll,

Post-High School - Several of the State vocational and technical schools have constructed and equipped additional shops during the past year; some are under construction, and a few will be under contract for construction soon.

Adult Emphasis will be given to the upgrading of employed persons into technical levels of employment to relieve shortages. Highest priority will be given to upgrading workers in the health occupations.

Persons with Special Needs In the State vocational-technical schools there will be added some 75 or more teachers to better serve this group. A counselor will be added in each school; a special teacher for the communication skills will be provided in each school; and a special teacher for mathematics and science will be provided for students with academic handicaps who need to be brought to a level to profit from vocational Instruction. There is close cooperation with student rehabilitation services whereby physically handicapped per sons are accepted and trained in both State schools and the secondary programs. The State School for the Deaf is supported in providing vocational Instruction, as is the State prison system for offenders prior to release from the terms served.

4. Construction of Area Vocational Schools

It appears that some six to eight school systems will desire to construct an area vocational school this year to serve all high school

ALABAMA

5. Ancillary Services

Several unfilled supervisory positions in the State will be filled. It is not anticipated that other positions will be created. Reimbursement will be provided for one or more teacher educators. State plans to expand the staff for curriculum development. The Research Coordinating Unit has been placed under contract with the Auburn

State University. 6, Transfer of Funds

The State did not request a transfer of funds.

1. Estimated Expenditures

Estimated Total Expenditures under all the Vocational Education Acts

(in thousands)

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ALASKA
Summary of Projected Program Activities

FY 1968

1. Manpower Needs and Employment Opportunities

Conservative estimates of the increase in Alaska employment for
FY 1968 anticipate a job gain of just under 3 percent. Fishing,
construction, and retail are expected to level off. Tourism will
continue to be a large factor in employment in Alaska.

2. Program Offerings

There are 13 Boroughs offering programs in vocational education. One area vocational school, the William E. Beltz Vocational School in Nome, serves the entire State. However, it only offers five programs and all at the secondary level--one each in distribution, home economics, and office education and two in trades and industry. Three main centers for vocational education will be in operation in fiscal 1968-69 the William Beltz, the Kodiak Aleutian School in Kodiak, and the Anchorage Community College in Anchorage.

3. Program Priorities

High School The vocational budget is essentially the same as last year, and there will not be any sizable increase in the program this fiscal year.

Nineteen new teachers will be required to meet the growing program at the secondary level, although no new or additional fields at this level are projected.

Post-High School - Additional implementation of last year's projection in associate degree and one-year technical business education programs is programed for the community college. Additional teachers will be needed in the six community colleges. One additional teacher will be needed for the technical and industrial staff at the Anchorage Community College. Continual emphasis is to be placed on the postsecondary level in business education. Associate degree requirements for the area of child day care supervisors are being worked out with the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Adult State Unions have been very active in this phase of the training programs. Fourteen additional full-time and part-time teachers will be required to fill turnover needs. Plans are to add three additional occupational fields.

Persons with Special Needs New teaching personnel will be needed for courses aimed at assisting culturally and socioeconomically handicapped persons. Training programs are being developed in cooperation with the Alaska Department of Health and Welfare. These programs are to train assistants for the child day care centers.

4. Construction of Area Schools

The second vocational school will be completed in the summer of 1967. The school, Kodiak Aleutian School, is located in the city of Kodiak.

ALASKA

construction trades, welding, refrigeration, clothing and skin processing, business machines, health, and drafting. This is to serve the State of Alaska in their programs and is in effect a boarding school.

5. Ancillary Services

The State Division of Vocational Education now has a complete staff which includes a director, an assistant director, and four supervisors. A teacher trainer has been hired for vocational education and will be located at the University of Alaska. The following workshops will be held; vocational education conference for all vocational education teachers, teacher-training workshops in the areas of distribution and family life, in-service training workshops for business education, and a guidance conference. A manual, 'The Vocational Instructor," is being distributed to be used by vocational teachers in the development and coordination of local programs with a special section to assist the adult Instructor. A curriculum guide for home economics has been published. A business education coordinator guide is to be published in FY 1968. A workshop to develop a manual on evaluation in home economics is planned,

6. Transfer of Funds

State transferred George-Barden Title I agriculture and Title III funds in the amount of $69,038 to the Vocational Education Act of 1963.

7. Estimated Total Expenditures under all the Vocational Education Acts

(in thousands)

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The opportunities for employment are basically in the occupational fields, the professional, semi-professional, technical and managerial. A trained manpower scarcity is beginning to appear for some service and semi-skilled occupations. Hundreds of job vacancies are going unfilled in business and industry because the labor force possessing the educational and skill requirements to fill these jobs is not available in sufficient quantities. At the present time over four per cent of Arizona's manpower resources (more than 20,000 people) are idle and not being utilized. The professional, semi-professional, and technical are expected to increase approximately 65 percent, clerical about 70 percent, and the skilled about 70 percent. To meet the manpower deficit during the next five years, Arizona's business, industry, and educational systems must expand their training capacity to provide training opportunities for these people.

2. Program Offerings

All fourteen counties in Arizona offer some vocational education. There are presently 8 schools designated as area vocational schools. Throughout the State there are 8 counties, basically in the northern half of the State, which do not have any area vocational schools.

3. Program Priorities

High School Emphasis on high school vocational education programs is projected to the occupational area where the need is greatest for trained worker 8--clerical, service, skilled, semi-skilled, clerktypist, stenographers, machinists, specialty sales persons, buyers, television and appliance service and repairmen, and auto mechanics. The trade and industrial education service has planned with local schools 14 new programs. New vocational office procedures programs will be offered in 13 high schools. A course guide, "Introduction to Agricultural Science," for first-year students of vocational agriculture has been revised to provide for a more adequate background in agricultural science as a base for all agricultural occupational fields. Practical nursing programs are being expanded and priority for the purchase of equipment will be given to this area. It is expected that a total of 100 new teachers will be needed during fiscal year 1968 to fill vacancies created by retirements, resignations, and other reasons to meet the needs of new programs.

Post -High School - Distributive education planning Includes one new specialized program which will prepare individuals for careers in the radio and television industry. Two new community colleges in Maricopa County will provide for the first time programs in agricultural technology, agri-business, and production agriculture. Two new associate degree programs in nursing will begin this year. A new civil engi

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