Behavioural Models in Psychopharmacology: Theoretical, Industrial and Clinical Perspectives

Front Cover
Paul Willner
Cambridge University Press, 1991 M02 21 - 540 pages
Behavioural models in psychopharmacology are used for different purposes. The main concern of industrial psychopharmacologists is specifically to develop new and improved drugs for the treatment of mental disorders, while basic scientists use animal models to investigate the underlying nature of such conditions. The important distinction between these different perspectives is made explicit for the first time in this book. By considering such conditions as anxiety, depression, mania and schizophrenia, feeding disorders, dementia, and drug dependence, this book provides a comprehensive and critical review of the adequacy of the behavioural procedures used by psychopharmacologists to model psychiatric disorders. Graduate students and research workers in pscyhopharmacology, from both academic and industrial spheres, as well as clinicians, will find this book of considerable interest.

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Contents

Behavioural models in psychopharmacology
3
Animal models of anxiety
21
Screening for anxiolytic drugs
50
a clinical
76
Animal models of depression
91
Screening for new antidepressant compounds
126
The clinical relevance of animal models
157
Animal models of eating disorders
177
Pharmacological evaluation of
311
Animal models of Alzheimers disease
359
Strategies for drug development in
419
the role of behavioral models
437
Animal models of drug abuse
453
Screening for abuse and dependence liabilities
485
The relevance of behavioural models of drug
503
Index
521

Screening methods for anorectic antiobesity
215
a clinical
237

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