A Report to the President: Full Report

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1956 - 126 pages
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Page 13 - What should our schools accomplish? 2. In what ways can we organize our school systems more efficiently and economically ? 3.
Page 92 - Ability to think and evaluate constructively and creatively. 6. Effective work habits and self-discipline. 7. Social competency as a contributing member of his family and community. 8. Ethical behavior based on a sense of moral and spiritual values. 9. Intellectual curiosity and eagerness for life-long learning. 10. Esthetic appreciation and self-expression in the arts. 11. Physical and mental health. 12. Wise use of time, including constructive leisure pursuits. 13. Understanding of the physical...
Page 103 - The participants approved by a ratio of more than 2 to 1 the proposition that the Federal Government should increase its financial participation in public education. Of those favoring such increase, the overwhelming majority approved an increase in Federal funds for school building construction. On the issue of Federal funds to the States for local school operation, the participants divided almost evenly.
Page 6 - We recommend that a new look be taken at the entire question of how much money this society should spend on education. In view of the recommendations of this Committee concerning the objectives of education, teachers, and buildings, it seems obvious that within the next decade the dollars spent on education in this Nation should be approximately doubled.
Page 9 - The order given by the American people to the schools is grand in its simplicity : in addition to intellectual achievement, foster morality, happiness, and any useful ability. The talent of each child is to be sought out and developed to the fullest. Each weakness is to be studied and, so far as possible, corrected.
Page 91 - ... 2. Appreciation for our democratic heritage. 3. Civic rights and responsibilities and knowledge of American institutions. 4. Respect and appreciation for human values and for the beliefs of others. 5. Ability to think and evaluate constructively and creatively. 6. Effective work habits and self-discipline. 7. Social competency as a contributing member of his family and community. 8. Ethical behavior based on a sense of...
Page 91 - It is the consensus of these groups that the schools should continue to develop: 1. The fundamental skills of communication — reading, writing, spelling as well as other elements of effective oral and written expression; the arithmetical and mathematical skills, including problem solving. While schools are doing the best job in their history in teaching these skills, continuous improvement is desirable and necessary. 2. Appreciation for our democratic heritage. 3. Civic rights and responsibilities...
Page 4 - Ignorance is a far greater handicap to an individual than it was a generation ago, and an uneducated populace is a greater handicap to a nation. This trend is obviously going to continue and quicken.
Page 8 - Vocational education tailored to the abilities of each pupil and to the needs of community and Nation. 5. Courses designed to teach domestic skills. 6. Training in leisure-time activities such as music, dancing, avocational reading, and hobbies. 7. A variety of health services for all children, including both physical and dental inspections, and instruction aimed at bettering health knowledge and habits. 8. Special treatment for children with speech or reading difficulties and other handicaps. 9....
Page 103 - Federal aid should never be permitted to become a deterrent to State and local initiative in education. The administration of Federal funds should be through the appropriate State agency for education. This State agency should determine the relative needs of local school districts. There was some opinion that Federal administration of financial grants for education should be vested in the US Office of Education. The delegates almost unanimously opposed any Federal control over educational use of...

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