The American Journal of Sociology, Volume 27

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Albion W. Small, Ellsworth Faris, Ernest Watson Burgess, Herbert Blumer, Everett Cherrington Hughes
University of Chicago Press, 1922
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Established in 1895 as the first U.S. scholarly journal in its field, AJS remains a leading voice for analysis and research in the social sciences, presenting work on the theory, methods, practice, and history of sociology. AJS also seeks the application of perspectives from other social sciences and publishes papers by psychologists, anthropologists, statisticians, economists, educators, historians, and political scientists.

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Page 42 - The reasonable man adapts himself to the world : the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.
Page 300 - Evolution is an integration of matter and concomitant dissipation of motion; during which the matter passes from an indefinite, incoherent homogeneity to a definite, coherent heterogeneity; and during which the retained motion undergoes a parallel transformation* * The definition of Evolution needs qualifying by introduction of the word "relatively" before each of its antithetical clauses.
Page 18 - Society not only continues to exist by transmission, by communication, but it may fairly be said to exist in transmission, in communication. There is more than a verbal tie between the words common, community, and communication. Men live in a community in virtue of the things which they have in common; and communication is the way in which they come to possess things in common.
Page 7 - ... and other officers of judicature and execution, artificial joints; reward and punishment (by which fastened to the seat of the sovereignty every joint and member is moved to perform his duty) are the nerves...
Page 41 - Rousseau is probably best known to the world by the famous words in which he begins the first chapter of the " Social Contract " : " Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains.
Page 189 - INSTINCT is usually defined as the faculty of acting in such a way as to produce certain ends, without foresight of the ends, and without previous education in the performance.
Page 60 - The socially inadequate classes, regardless of etiology or prognosis, are the following: (I) Feeble-minded; (2) Insane (including the psychopathic); (3) Criminalistic (including the delinquent and wayward); (4) Epileptic; (5) Inebriate (including drug habitues); (6) Diseased (including the tuberculous. the syphilitic, the leprous, and others with chronic, infectious...
Page 292 - Shanghai, on yearly subscriptions 43 cents, on single copies 7 cents. Claims for missing numbers should be made within the month following the regular month of publication. The publishers expect to supply missing numbers free only when losses have been sustained in transit and when the reserve stock will permit.
Page 7 - Art goes yet further, imitating that rational and most excellent work of nature, man ; for by art is created that great leviathan, called a Commonwealth, or State, (in Latin Ciutas) which is but an artificial man...
Page 171 - In our own life the intimacy of the neighborhood has been broken up by the growth of an intricate mesh of wider contacts which leaves us strangers to people who live in the same house. And even in the country the same principle is at work, though less obviously, diminishing our economic and spiritual community with our neighbors. How far this change is a healthy development, and how far a disease, is perhaps still uncertain.

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