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is essential to the continued political and social health of this country.

Accord

ingly, we oppose all proposals which would allow public funds to be used for private

schools.

Last April, in his Message on Special Revenue for Education, President

Nixon stated:

"Non-public schools bear a significant share of the cost and effort

of providing education for our children today.

Federal aid to education should

take this fully into account.

This proposal would do that by considerably broaden

ing the authority for extending aid to students in non-public schools.

Non-public

school students would be counted in the reckoning of population for purposes of

allocation, and all forms of educational services would be available to them."

It is apparent that s. 1669 could well provide substantial support to non

public schools

a development which we deplore.

Once the concept of federal

revenue-sharing is extended to include church schools we will have made a major

departure from our basic doctrine of separation of church and state, and we may

then expect to see further weakening of the wall of separation.

To us the consti

tutional and historical safeguards of separation of church and state represent,

not sterile legal doctrine, but important public policy

a policy which must not

be diluted or otherwise weakened.

There is no doubt that public education needs strengthening

with better

planning, greater accountability, and greater financial support.

This is true in

every state and in every school district in the country.

However, the bill before

us falls far short of meeting those needs, and, in our opinion, it carries within

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Thank you for the opportunity to appear before you to voice our concerns.

Senator PELL. Our next and final witness is Mr. Edward D'Alessio of the U.S. Catholic Conference. Would you introduce your colleagues, please?

STATEMENT OF EDWARD R. D'ALESSIO, PH.D., DIRECTOR, DIVISION

OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, U.S. CATHOLIC CONFERENCE, ACCOMPANIED BY: REV. FRANK H. BREDEWEG, C.S.B., DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS, NATIONAL CATHOLIC EDUCATIONAL ASSOCIATION; AND FRANK J. MONAHAN, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENTAL PROGRAMS, DIVISION OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, U.S. CATHOLIC CONFERENCE

Mr. D'ALESSIO. Yes; on my right is Father Frank Bredeweg, director of special projects, National Catholic Educational Association and on my left is Frank Monahan, assistant director of governmental programs, Division of Elementary and Secondary Education, U.S. Catholic Conference.

Senator Pell. Have you a prepared statement?
Mr. D'ALESSIO. Yes, we do.

Senator PELL. If you would like to abbreviate it, the whole text will appear in the record or you may read the whole thing.

(The prepared statement of Mr. Þ'Alessio follows:)

Statement of

Edward R. D'Alessio, Ph.D.

Director
Division of Elementary and Secondary Education

United States Catholic Conference

Before the

Subcommittee on Education

of the
Committee on Labor and Public Welfare

United States Senate

Wednesday, November 3, 1971

2:30 P.M.

Accompanied by:

Rev. Frank H. Bredeweg, C.S.B.
Director of Special Projects
National Catholic Educational Association

Frank J. Monahan
Assistant Director, Governmental Programs
Division of Elementary and Secondary Education
United States Catholic Conference

Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee:

I want first to express my gratitude and that of my

colleagues, Father Bredeweg and Mr. Monahan, for the opportunity to

speak with you today about the important issues being considered by

this Committee.

Although the primary concern of the Division of

Elementary and Secondary Education of the United States Catholic

Conference is the continued welfare and improvement of Catholic

schools, the Division, like other responsible agencies in American

education, realizes that all American schools

public and private

nonprofit, church-related as well as non-denominational

are

united in the effort to provide better education for the country's

children and young people.

Nonpublic elementary and secondary

schools, moreover, now educate some five million American children

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large majority of which are Catholic schools, constitute a significant segment of the total American educational enterprize. They are, as President Nixon has said, an "integral part" of American education.

As I indicated in the Director's statement to the President's

Commission on School Finance earlier this year, the Federal

government has the responsibility to take a truly comprehensive view of American education, and adopt programs and policies that will

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contribute to the well-being of both the public and nonpublic

schools; the Federal government should view itself as an"enabler"

of educational excellence in all American schools.

It must help

to create the practical partnership in American education which,

one hopes, will be an emerging reality of the years ahead.

As

President Nixon concluded in his Education Revenue Sharing Proposal

to Congress, April 6, 1971, "nonpublic schools bear a significant share

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of the cost and effort of providing education for our children today.

Federal aid to education should take this fully into account."

Although our specific concern today is the effect that

S.1669, the "Education Revenue Sharing Act of 1971", would have on

Federal assistance programs in which students attending nonpublic

schools are eligible to participate, we at the United States Catholic

Conference also have a keen interest in the broader implications of the

"revenue sharing" approach to the Federal financing of American education. Education revenue sharing is, in our view, more accurately

described as "categorical grant-in-aid consolidation" or "block granting" because it proposes a massive combination of thirty-three existing Federal elementary and secondary educational programs into five broad

categories.

State and local educational agencies would share in Federal

revenues for the purpose of "administering them in carrying out

educational programs reflecting areas of national concern."

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