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Relation of the Physician to the Public; To Each Other, and

to the Patient, 516.

Relation of the Hospital Nurse to the Doctor, and the Rela-
tion of the Doctor to the Nurse, 339.

Relation of Pathological Conditions in Oto-Rhinology to

Renal Tumor, Report of a Case. 226.

Relief from Toothache Due to Acute Pulpitis, 497.

Roentgen Ray in the Diagnosis of Bone and Joint Lesions,

624.

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Black, B. T., 210, 504.
Blackburn, J. H., 212.
Blackburn, W. T., 525.
Blades, J. M., 301.
Blaydes, H. B., 209.
Bledsoe, R. W., 16.

Bledsoe, B. A., 607, 614.
Blue, Rupert, 409.

Board, Milton, 97, 573, 574, 576.

Bodine, J. M., 163.

Boggess. W. F., 164, 501, 536, 639.

Bolin, J. A., 404.
Boldrick, J. T., 567.
Bolin, B. J., 182.

Bone, Robt, L., 318.
Botts, A. T., 580.

Bow, J. E., 254, 204, 346.
Bowman, J. W., 254.
Brady, A. S., 40, 136.
Brice, J. C. S., 348.
Brock, O. D., 41, 563.
Bronner, Herbert, 200, 266.
Broshead, C. K., 62.
Brown, O. W., 210.
Bryan, W. A., 450.

Buckner, J. S., 504.

Buchanan, J. B., 210, 211.

Burch, L. E., 403.

Burnett, E. D., 209, 401, 535, 566, 574.

Bush, D. H., 526.

Butler, G. F., 201.

с

Cain, A. W., 351, 404, 409, 292, 568.

Cain, A. N., 257.
Caldwell, Delia, 208.

Caldwell, J. H., 30.

Carroll, F. G., 256, 257.
Carroll, Owen, 502.

Carr, W. H., 501.
Carson, J. O., 144.

Carpenter, J. G., 567, 580, 607.

Cartwright, Fred, 212.

Casper, M., 327, 343, 611.

Cassady, R. B., 526.

Castle, W. R., 404.

Caudle, B. A., 130, 205, 500, 638.
Chandler, W. S., 208.
Chance, H. C, 63, 135.
Chrisman, J. H., 136.
Clark, H. C., 210.
Clayton, C. F., 37, 70.
Collins, M. M., 538.
Collett. W. T., 352, 505.
Cockrell, B. A., 58.

Combest, J. H., 503.
Cooper, J. R., 207.

Craig, T. E., 256, 299, 345, 465, 501.

Crawford, J. F., 43.

Crenshaw, J. W., 403, 445.

Crouch, H. T., 206, 402, 582.

Crume, S. B., 42.

Curd, T. H., 66.

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Foster, J. C., 3, 209. Fox, J. Ernest, 297. Frank, Louis, 347, 501. Frankel, S. C., 458. Frantz, J. A., 254. Frazer, B. C., 526. Freeman, J. A., 221. Frey, W. R., 403, 639. Funk, E. A., Judge, 28.

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Henry, L. R., 204.
Herring, H. G., 438.
Hester, J. H., 443.
Hibbitt, C. W., 555.
Hiestand, C. V., 210, 640.
Higgins, E. H., 206.
Higdon, A. R., 402.

Hocker, R. C,, 206.

Harned, J. W., 250.

Harbold, J. E.L., 209, 217.
Harris, J. H., 250.
Harrison, J. H., 294.

Harrison, E. M., 53.

Hays, H. H., 37.

Heath, C. L., 166, 566, 572, 576.

Health, L. F., 257.
Henderson, E. L., 558.

Heizer, W. L., 15, 552.
Hendrick, J. G., 351.

Hermann, G. J., 365, 382, 535, 565.

Hoffman, C. G., 197, 201, 323.

Holbrook, J. H., 404.

Hoover, I. J., 39.

Hopkins, S. M., 210, 228. Howard, C. C., 204, 346, 638.

Howard, G. L., 470.

Howard, E. M., 55.

Huddle, G. E., 212.
Hunt, A. P., 40, 254.
Hunt, H. H., 258, 348, 351.

Irvin, W. E., 581.

Jackson, E. W., 410.
Jackson, W. Z., 38, 206, 581.
Jefferson, C. W., 267.

Jenkins, J. O., 107, 360, 493.

Jenkins, W. A,. 199.
Johnson, H. V., 257.
Jervey, J. W., 150.
Jones, T. L,, 403.
Jones, L. J., 68, 76.
Jones, J. J., 38.

Jones, J. F., 208, 332, 570.

Jones, C. C.,3 7.

Jones, J. C., 499.
Jordan. J. C., 499.
Joyner, W. H., 631.

I

J

K

Kahn, Lee. 271, 272.
Kash, M. C., 195, 209.
Kellar, H. S., 136, 251.
Keen, W. C., 253.

Keith, D. Y., 270, 319, 626.
Keith. J. Paul, 205, 501, 562.
Kelley, J. E., 250.
Kelsay, O. M., 164.

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Lambert, Stinson, 581, 628.
Lawrence, Graham, 257.

Layman, R. T., 207, 255, 299, 300.
Lederman, I., 10, 19, 26, 617.
Leech, J. S., 580.
Lehmann, J. S., 402.
Ligon, Peyton, 166, 254, 298.
Linn, C. H., 564, 574.
Lipskey, Isaac, 404.
Lock, J. S., 569, 577.
Lockhardt, J. F.. 208.
Long, W. H., 321, 591.
Lovan, G. W., 500.
Lutz, J. S., 299.

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L

Mithoefer, W. M., 205.

Molloy, J. J., 364.

Molloy, L. P., 254.

M

Montgomery, F. H., 215, 314.

Moore, W. B., 136, 166, 501.

Moore, P. D., 298.

Moore, T. W., 603, 618.

Morrison, J. Rowan, 155.

Moss, T. E., 208.

Mudd, J. J., 526, 597. Myers, J. E., 254. Murphy, J. W., 24. Murphy, J. B., 627.

Moren, J. J., 92, 98, 121, 255, 256, 257, 611.

Moss, C. A., 38, 43, 565, 566, 616, 617.

Mosby, W. L., 206, 342, 542, 582.

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Poole, W. A., 38, 41.

Pope, Curran, 86,96, 184,268, 271, 299, 321, 411, 459, 476,
502, 551, 587.
Powell, V. L., 208.
Powell, Rev. E. L., 551.

Price, J. D., 255, 257.

Price, J. W., 161, 244, 283.

Pritchett, J. H., 275.

President, The, 557, 559, 560, 570, 571, 572, 574, 575. Pryor, J. W., 481.

Purcell, C. E., 208,611, 618, 621, 623.

Purdy, George, 209.

Rankin, G. C., 402, 448.

Rash, O. W., 39.

Ravitch, M. L., 4, 87, 105, 108, 144, 155,216, 263, 309,

485, 591, 611.

Ray, J. M., 5, 14, 606.

Ray, W. R., 257.

Rau, E., 212, 423.
Read, H. L.. 273.

Reesor, O. R., 640.
Rees, J. M., 165.

Reddick, J. T., 208, 226, 487, 536, 564, 595.

Redmon, L. C., 562, 574.

Reynolds, W. E., 205, 500, 639.

Reynolds, D. S., 114, 120, 186, 187, 354.

Reynolds, C. W., 489.

Reynolds, H. G., 514.

Reynolds, J. F., 165, 621.

Rice, J. H., 206.

R

Richardson, Jno. B., 244, 247, 272, 283.

Richardson, Sara F., 526

Richmond, W. W,, 559, 572, 597.

Ridgway, S. H., 298, 299.

Riggs, C. T., 300, 502.
Riley, E. T., 205, 447.
Robertson, C. A., 41.

Robertson, G. A., 13.
Rodman, H. D., 32, 42.

Rodman, J. J., 40, 326, 565, 581.

Rogers, C. W., 207.

Rogers, J. F., 212.
Rogers, W. R., 501.
Rogers, N. R., 502.
Rose, B. C., 470.
Rozzell, W. W., 250.
Ryerson, E. W., 72, 75.
Rutherford, B. S., 212.

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Smock, S. J.. 249, 346, 499.

Smock, B. W., 85, 163.

Smith, C. M., 43.

Smith, E. B., 166, 210.

Smith, E. H., 204.

Smith, Grant, 210.

Solomon, Leon L., 155, 183, 199, 267, 534, 578.

Spaulding, C. B., 256, 257.

Speidel, Edward, 174, 310, 488, 601.

Sphire, D. S., 250.

Spicer, W. W., 298.
Stallard, H. H., 570.
Stark, J. V., 468.
Steinberg, S. A., 591.
Stevens, E. A., 523, 527.
Stewart, P. H., 538.
Stine, F. A., 358.

Stites, F. M., 403, 639.
Stone, J. W., 563.

Stone, T. W., 212.

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Wells, J. E.. 136, 297, 560

Wells, E. D., 607, 622.

V

Wathen, J. R., 173, 278, 312, 347, 502.

Watts, W. H., 229, 403, 500.

Webb, J. R., 254.

Weidner, Carl, 595.

W

Yager, N. T., 608.

York, S. R. 567.

Young, J. F., 212. 239, 404. Youtsey, Claude, 377.

Wells, J. P., 404.

White, J. B., 500.
Wicker, M. V., 206, 501.
Wiley, E. M., 86, 132.
Williams, J. M., 204.
Williams, F. M., 404.
Willis, W. T., 208.

Widrig, T. J., 367.

Wilmoth. A. D., 244, 313.
Williams. U. V., 136, 165. 251, 501.
Wilson, J. E., 210, 227.
Wilson, D. S., 198, 594.
Wilson, J. E., 210, 227.
Windell, J. T., 347.
Wood, W. R., 297.
Woodburn, Clarence, 351.
Wood, R. R., 206.
Wright, B.
Wright, J. R., 11.
Wright, O. E., 501.

Zimmerman, B. F., 245. Zimmerman, Carolyn E., 380.

211, 212, 529, 539, 570.

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Serum Ferments and Antiferments After Feeding. According to the authors, an increase in noncoagulable nitrogen of the serum can be determined after feeding, reaching a maximum in about six hours. This increase is greatest in the portal blood and is partially due to an increase in amino-acids. There is no increase in proteoses. There is usually a progressive decrease in serum proteose, reaching a minimum after from five to seven hours. The portal blood may show an unaltered or an increased amount of protease. The serum antiferment shows a slight increase, but is subject to considerable fluctuation. The serum lipase (esterase) shows a slight increase, reaching a maximum after three hours. The hepatic blood usually contains the lowest concentration of lip

ase.

The Pituitary Body. "The evidence that the pituitary body is essential to life is now convincing," says The Journal of the American Medical Association. "Paulesco and Cushing, using an improved technic, showed that fatal results are to be expected from removal of the anterior lobe. Partial removal of the anterior lobe led to strik

ing changes in metabolism. The knowledge that extracts of the anterior lobe, which is glandular in structure, are without marked immediate effects when injected intravenously, whereas extracts of the posterior lobe, which is a nervous structure, produce striking immediate results, is very interesting when one considers that removal of the posterior lobe is compatible with life, while removal of the anterior lobe terminates fatally. Feeding experiments have not been wholly satisfactory. Wulzen has recently found that when young fowls were fed with anterior lobe substance a retardation of growth resulted. This effect was especially marked in males.

"From therapeutic point of view the most striking results have come from the administration of posterior lobe extracts. Favorable results have been reported by many from the use of posterior lobe extracts in the treatment of postpartum hemorrhage, uterine inertia and postoperative shock; on the other hand, its use in labor is in certain cases followed by grave results; rupture of the uterus being reported after the repeated administration of some commercial preparations.

"The recent work from the Hygienic Laboratory by Roth of the Public Health Service on the standardization of pituitary extracts may throw some light on some of the results obtained in therapeutics, Roth examined preparations obtained from six different manufacturers and found that the activity of commercial posterior lobe extracts varied widely when tested by three different methods, their relative activity on the isolated uterus of the guinea-pig being as 7:5 to 1. The commercial preparations which have been responsible for untoward results ahve therefore been shown to be exceedingly active ones. Roth could assign no positive reason for such great variability. He concludes that there is need for uniformity in the strength of commercial pituitary preparations, and to bring this about advo cates their standardization on the isolated uterus of the virgin guinea-pig, suggesting an arbitrary standard. He further suggests that clinical studies should then be made to determine the therapeutic dosage."

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Bacillus Coli Communis in Blood of Man.During routine bacteriological examinations of blood at the Philpipine General Hospital, four cases of blood infection by bacillus coli communis came under Ruediger's observaton. Two of the cases proved fatal and two ended in re

covery.

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