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ing. I am professor and chairman of the Department of Surgery at Howard University.

I very much appreciate the opportunity to appear before you and this committee. I know my time is short, so I will make several points which the American Cancer Society believes are critical to continued progress against cancer in this country in 1992.

We recommend an appropriation of $2.612 billion for the National Cancer Institute for fiscal year 1992. This figure represents that portion of our national resources we believe should be devoted to the cancer battle in this country. The $2.612 billion figure is a result of the scientific judgment and wisdom of the best cancer research minds in the world.

We respect and in general trust their judgment. We would offer some small variations in priorities, such as diverting higher funds for research grants, training, and cancer centers, but we would prefer to discuss these minor alterations after they receive the full $2.612 billion appropriation.

Cancer centers especially must have significant additional funding and must have more than is projected in the President's budget. Funding for cancer centers is down 15 percent since 1980. The President's fiscal year 1992 budget asked for a statistically insignificant 2.4-percent increase in cancer center funding. If this figure prevails, existing centers will not be fully funded. Some will lose funding entirely.

I can tell you that progress is slowing because of lost opportunities resulting from modest funding increases in recent years. In fact, in constant dollars the National Cancer Institute has received almost $100 million less in 1990 than in 1980. That 6-percent loss grows to an alarming. 18.5-percent loss when you subtract National Cancer Institute funding mandated by AIDS.

Last week, a National Cancer Institute report reconfirmed the results of a well-documented American Cancer Society study released in 1989, that in this country cancer is mainly a disease of

the poor.

We look forward to working with the National Cancer Institute to push the thrust of cancer control to prevention, early detection, and improvement of access to cancer care by the socioeconomically disadvantaged, uninsured, and underinsured. The National Cancer Institute needs funding of $2.612 billion to achieve these important goals.

Mr. Chairman, in addition to the important ongoing work of the National Cancer Institute in cancer control and research, the American Cancer Society also supports a significant increase in the Centers for Disease Control, called the CĐC, budget. As the key Federal agency dedicated to disease prevention and health promotion, we urge you to support an appropriation of $2 billion for the CDC in fiscal year 1992.

PREPARED STATEMENT

In addition, one of CDC's most important ongoing programs is the breast and cervical cancer mortality prevention program established last year. Funding for these State grants will be used to target poor and underserved women with breast and cervical cancer screening, referral, and education services. We recommend an in

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crease in funding for this program to $80 million in fiscal year 1992. This funding is needed to make proven, effective services available to the millions of women in this country who require them.

Again, I want to thank you for the opportunity of presenting this testimony this morning.

(The statement follows:)

STATEMENT OF LASALLE LEFFALL Good Morning, Mr. Chairman. I am Dr. LaSalle Lesfall, past president of the American Canær Society. As you know, the ACS is the neighborhood based voluntary health agency that neither solicits nor receives government funding. I am Professor and Chairman of the Department of Surgery at Howard University. I very much appreciate the opportunity to appear before you and this committee. I know my time is short, so I will make several points which the American Cancer Society believes are critical to continued progress against cancer in this country in 1992.

We recommend an appropriation of $2.612 billion for NCI for fiscal year 1992. This figure represents that portion of our national resources we believe should be devoted to the cancer battle in this country. The $2.612 billion figure is a result of the scientisic judgment and wisdom of the best cancer research minds in the world. We respect, and, in general, trust their judgment. We would offer some small variations in priorities, such as devoting higher funds for research grants, training, and cancer centers, but we would prefer to discuss these minor alterations after they receive the full $2.612 billion.

Cancer centers, especially, must have significant additional funding than is projected in the President's budget. Centers were once the stars in the national cancer program crown—the highly visible focal point of the nation's cancer research, prevention and treatment efforts. Cancer ænters are the national cancer program to the American people. They are where these people are helped. Funding for cancer centers is down 15 percent since 1980. The President's fiscal year 1992 budget asks for a statistically insignificant 2.4 peront increase in center funding. If this figure prevails, existing centers will not be fully funded; some will lose funding entirely.

Mr. Chairman, time does not permit me to elaborate on the exciting progress against cancer which has been made in the past 20 years under the National Cancer Act. I can tell you that progress is slowing because of lost opportunities resulting from modest funding increases in reænt years. In fact, in constant dollars, NCI has received almost $100 million less in 1990 than in 1980. That 6 percent loss grows to an alarming 18.5 percent loss when you subtract NCI funding mandated for AIDS.

Mr. Chairman, last week an NCI report reconfirmed the results of well documented American Cancer Society study released in 1989, that in this country, cancer is mainly a disease of the poor. We look forward to working with NCI to push the thrust of cancer control to prevention, early detection and improvement of access to cancer care by the socioeconomically disadvantaged, uninsured and underinsured. The NCI needs funding of $2.612 billion to achieve these important goals.

Mr. Chairman, in addition to the important ongoing work of the NCI in cancer control and research, the American Cancer Society also supports a significant increase in the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) budget. As the key federal agency dedicated to disease prevention and health promotion, we urge you to support an appropriation of $2 billion for CDC in fiscal year 1992. In addition, one of CDC's most important ongoing programs is the Breast and Cervical Cancer Mortality Prevention Program established last year. Funding for these state grants will be used to target poor and underserved women with breast and cervical cancer screening, referral, and education services. We recommend an increase in funding for this program to $80 million in fiscal year 1992. This funding is needed to make proven, effective services available to the millions of women in this country who require them.

Thank you

Senator AKAKA. Thank you for your testimony. Just one question.
Dr. LEFFALL. Yes.

Senator AKAKA. What is your assessment of the first year of the breast and cervical cancer mortality prevention program?

Dr. LEFFALL. I think that the results so far have been quite good. The American Cancer Society itself has had three programs, one in Miami, one in Oakland, one in New York, on this. This is an area that is needed vitally, and I think that with the help of the American Cancer Society with CDC this could be even much larger and one that would really serve the needs of the Nation's population, the women of this country.

Senator AKAKA. I notice that you were asking for 80,000 for that program.

Dr. LEFFALL. $80 million.
Senator AKAKA. $80 million.

Dr. LEFFALL. Yes; I want to be sure that gets on the record, Senator.

Senator AKAKA. Certainly that question was to get an insight in what you are doing there.

Any questions, Mr. Chairman?
Senator INOUYE. No.

Dr. LEFFALL. Thank you again, Senator Akaka, Senator Inouye. STATEMENT OF KENNETH DUGAN, DIRECTOR, HAWAII JOB CORPS ACCOMPANIED BY CLAUDETTE NAAUAO, ADMINISTRATOR, EMPLOY.

MENT SERVICES DIVISION, JOBHELP STORE Senator INOUYE (presiding). First of all, my apologies to all of you. I left New York this morning at 7:35 a.m., and somehow there is bad weather around the city. We just landed a few minutes ago. I was in the air for about 2 hours. So I hope you will forgive me.

Our first panel from Hawaii this morning consists of the following: the Director of the Hawaii Job Corps, Mr. Ken Dugan; the Administrator, Ms. Claudette Naauao; and the-those two, yes. I am sorry. The Administrator of the Employment Services Division of the Jobhelp Store. Would the two witnesses come forward.

Mr. Dugan, welcome, sir.

Mr. DUGAN. Thank you, Senator. I wish to thank the Senator and members of the subcommittee for the opportunity to present testimony in behalf of the Hawaii Job Corps program.

In May of this year, the Hawaii Job Corps Center will celebrate 25 years of service to the youth of Hawaii and Micronesia. During this time, over 10,000 young men and women have been provided intensive programs of education, vocational training, social skills development, and other support services to assist them in becoming more responsible, employable, and productive citizens.

The thousands of graduates of the Hawaii Job Corps have been placed into well-paying jobs, higher education and entry into the armed forces of our country, ensuring them an avenue for career success and the hope for a bright future for themselves and their families.

Established in 1966, the Hawaii Job Corps Center is presently managed and operated under a cooperative teaming agreement by Pacific Educational Foundation, the prime contractor, and Management and Training Corporation. As the Hawaii Job Corps services the Pacific Basin, the student population is comprised of young people from the State of Hawaii, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Marianas, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the Republic of Belau.

There are currently three campuses of the Hawaii Job Corps. The main campus is located at Kokohead on the Island of Oahu, servicing 205 males and females. The second campus is located on the island of Maui, servicing 82 young men and women.

The third site is located at the U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll facility in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. This pilot project commenced in 1987 to provide academic and English preparation to Marshallese youth from the Island of Ebeye before their transfer to Hawaii for vocational skills training. Currently there are 30 day students being trained on Kwajalein, Republic of Marshall Islands.

The Hawaii Job Corps Center, in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Labor and the State of Hawaii, is developing plans to relocate the Kokohead campus to a 12-acre parcel of State land in the town of Waimanalo. The construction of a new Job Corps facility on Oahu will provide a long-term commitment to the youth of Hawaii and Micronesia, as well as provide a new physical environment to continue our pursuit of excellence in education and training

The new Hawaii Job Corps facility will become a model for education and training of disadvantaged and at-risk youth. The proposed expansion of our services will provide a variety of new programs, to include child care, and will not only enable the Hawaii Job Corps to better serve its students, but also provide an effective center for linkages and support programs for the entire State of Hawaii.

The current proposed expansion of the National Job Corps program, calling for the servicing of 50 percent more youth by expanding the Job Corps with 50 additional Job Corps centers over the next 10 years, should be fully supported by the Congress. The Job Corps 50–50 initiative, which is supported by business, labor and volunteer organizations, is a systematic approach to provide quality education and training to the poor and at-risk youth.

The National Job Corps Program has been a proven, cost effective program for 27 years. The social and economic benefits of the National Job Corps Program are staggering. Over 1.5 million youth have been successfully trained to become productive members of their community.

The Job Corps 50–50 plan could and should have positive effects on the Hawaii Job Corps Program. Currently only .8 percent of the poverty youth in the State of Hawaii can be served by Job Corps. This does not take into account 40,000 disenfranchised youth throughout the Pacific Basin.

Job Corps' structured residential nature allows for taking young people of the Pacific out of their defeating home environments, developing technical skills and communications abilities, in addition to basic work values and industrial cultural literacy.

The Hawaii Job Corps has been consistently evaluated by the U.S. Department of Labor as one of the top performing Job Corps centers in the United States. We are currently ranked as the number one Job Corps center in the United States. Our commitment to excellence for the youth of Hawaii and the Pacific Basin will always remain.

PREPARED STATEMENT

Our long term commitment to disenfranchised youth will continue. The Hawaii Job Corps for 25 years has been the Federal Government's commitment to youth of the Pacific to ensure quality education, training and support in the battle against poverty and despair.

On behalf of the Hawaii Job Corps Program, our students and graduates, I wish to thank you very much for the opportunity to testify.

[The statement follows:]

STATEMENT OF KENNETH DUGAN I wish to thank Senator Inouye and the members of the Senate Subcommittee for the opportunity to present testimony in behalf of the Hawaii Job Corps program.

In May of this year, the Hawaii Job Corps Center will celebrate 25 years of servo ice to the youth of Hawaii and Micronesia. During this time, over 10,000 young men and women have been provided intensive programs of education, vocational training, social skills development, and other support services to assist them in becoming more responsible, employable and productive citizens. The thousands of graduates of the Hawaii Job Corps have been placed into well paying jobs, higher education and entry into the Armed Forces of our country, insuring them an avenue for career success and the hope for a bright future for themselves and their families.

Established in 1966, the Hawaii Job Corps Center is presently managed and operated under a cooperative teaming agreement by Pacific Educational Foundation, Inc., Prime Contractor and Management & Training Corporation. As the Hawaii Center services the Pacific Basin, the student population is comprised of young people from the State of Hawaii, Guam, the Commonwealth of Marianas, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the Republic of Belau.

There are currently three campuses of the Hawaii Job Corps. The main campus is located at Kokohead on the island of Oahu and serves 205 males and females. The second campus is located on the island of Maui on the site of the old Maunaolu College and services 82 males and females. The third site is located at the United States Army Kwajalein Atoll facility in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. This pilot project commenced in 1987 to provide academic and English preparation to the Marshallese youth from the island of Ebeye before their transfer to Hawaii for vocational skills training. Presently, there are 30 day students being trained on Kwajalein R.M.I.

Currently, the Hawaii Job Corps Center, in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Labor and the State of Hawaii, is developing plans to relocate the Kokohead Campus to a 12 acre parcel of State land in the town of Waimanalo. The construction of a new Job Corps facility on Oahu will provide a long-term commitment to the youth of Hawaii and Micronesia as well as provide a new. physical environment to continue our pursuit of excellence in Education and Training. The new Hawaii Job Corps facility will become a model for the education and training of disadvantaged and at risk youth. The proposed expansion of our services will provide a variety of new programs to include child care which will not only enable the Hawaii Job Corps to better serve its students but also provide an effective Center for linkages and support programs for the entire State of Hawaii.

The current proposed expansion of the National Job Corps program calling for the servicing of 50 percent more youth by expanding the Job Corps with 50 additional Centers over the next ten years should be fully supported by the Congress. The Job Corps 50–50 initiative, supported by business, labor and volunteer organizations is a systematic approach to provide quality education and training to the poor and at risk youth. Job Corps has been a proven, cost effective program for 27 years. The social and economic benefits of the Job Corps program are staggering. Over 1.5 million youth have been successfully trained to become productive members of their community.

The Job Corps 50–50 plan could and should have positive effects on the Hawaii Job Corps programs. Currently only 0.8 percent of the poverty youth in the State of Hawaii can be served by Job Corps. This does not take into account the 40,000 disenfranchised youth throughout the Pacific Basin. Job Corps' structured residential nature allows for taking young people of the Pacific out of their defeating home environments, developing technical skills and communications abilities in addition to basic work values and industrial society cultural literacy.

The Hawaii Job Corps has been consistently evaluated by the U.S. Department of Labor as one of the top performing Job Corps Centers in the United States. Our commitment to excellence for the youth of Hawaii and the Pacific basin will always

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