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Recommendation: $6.4 million was provided in fiscal y ar 1991 for the Native Hawaiian Education Act. I recommend that $6.7 million be provided for fiscal year 1992.

PACIFIC BASIN HEALTH In 1989, the University of Hawaii School of Public Health conducted a comprehensive re-survey of the health status of U.S.-related jurisdictions in the Pacific. This survey was commissioned by the Public Health Service which is currently preparing a summary report to Congress. I look forward, as do my Congressional colleagues, to receiving this report.

We already know, from the previous survey done in 1984, that the U.S.-related Pacific Islands have been experiencing rapid change, with population growth and development. Their populations have many health problems associated with social disruption. Resources in this region are scar 2 and there is increasing demand on health services and resources. Preventable health problems continue to persist.

In the fiscal year 1991 $2.44 million was appropriated for Pacific Basín health initiatives. Or this amount $1.65 million was for the Medical Officers Program, which provides training for about 125 Micronesian medical officers who will provide primary health care in severely underserved areas of American Samoa and the Trust Territories.

The other funds are for initiatives to improve health services and systems in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, American Samor, Guam, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau. Emphasis is placed on preventive health services, mental health, substance abuse, epidemiological issues, maternal and child health, and environmental health.

I believe that the 1989 data will revalidate the continuing need for federal support to build local health care capacity in the Pacific region.

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STATEMENT OF

HON. ENI F.H. FALEOMAVAEGA, U.S. REPRESENTATIVE FROM AMERICAN SAMOA Senator AKAKA. I would like at this time- should tell you that

are expecting Members of Cngress from Hawaii, Congresswoman Patsy Mink and Congressman Neil Abercrombie. And we also have present here a Congressman from Samoa, and I would like to call on my friend, my brother, the Congressman from Samoa, Congressman Faleomavaega, and ask him to come forward. Following him will be Dr. LaSalle Le all.

I welcome my brother from Samoa and look forward to your testimony to the committee this morning.

Mr. FALEOMAVAEGA. Mr. Chairman, thank ou very much for the opportunity to appear before this distinguished committee. I would like to ask the chairman, request that my statement be made part of the record in total.

Senator AKAKA. Without objection, it will be added to the record.

Mr. FALEOMAVAEGA. In the interet of time and for the others who wish to testify, I will summarire my statement accordingly. But before doing so, Mr. Chairman, I want to express my sincere aloha to you for the outstanding leadership that you have displayed, not only on behalf of the people of Hawaii, but certainly for all of the native Americans throughout America.

I want to express my aloha to you, and we miss you on the House side, even though we know that you are doing such a tremendous job here, not only on behalf of our Nation, but certainly for the good people of Hawaii.

I am sorry I am the only one remaining there. I suppose I am still going to carry on a caucus thert as the Polynesian caucus in that respect. But nevertheless, I shall endeavor to do the best I can.

Senator AKAKA. I want to tell you that I miss that, too, and that to also mention that every time you and I spoke on the floor of the House our friends would say: There goes the Polynesian caucus.

Mr. FALEOMAVAEGA. Mr. Chairman, I really appreciate this opportunity, again, and again for you chairing this very important hearing. And without any further ado, I would like just to make my statement accordingly.

Mr. Chairman, today I would like to specifically address the JTPA Samoan Employment and Training Program this morning. Last year I appeared before your committee to testify in support of the continued funding for the Samoan Employment and Training Program, which is funded under title IV.D of the Job Training Partnership Act.

As members of this committee are aware, of all the minority groups in the United States the native Samoan Americans I believe suffer most economically, primarily due to educational, cultural, and language barriers. The relevant 1990 census figures will not be released until next month, I believe. However, the 1980 census shows that the national per capita income of native American Samoans was $3,573.

During the same time, native American Samoans living in Hawaii received far less than any ethnic group surveyed, with a per capita income of $2,700. 37.5 percent of native Samoan Americans in Hawaii lived at poverty level, as opposed to 7.8 percent of the total State population in Hawaii.

In regards to the native Samoan Americans residing in California, 21 percent lived at poverty level, as opposed to 8.7 percent of the total population of the State of California. In the State of Washington, 58 percent of the native Samoans lived at or below the poverty level, as opposed to 26.4 percent of the total State population in Washington. Additionally, native Samoans are above only the American Indians, with the second to the lowest high school graduation rate in the State of Washington.

It is also a known fact that a significant percentage of our people are affected by chronic unemployment and underemployment and are recipients of welfare assistance. There is a general lack of basic skills in English proficiency and a growing rate of substance abuse, domestic violence, and gang affiliation.

Since its inception in 1989, the JTPA Samoan Employment and Training Program has begun to address employment and training needs of our people through targeted training programs, such as pre-employment and classroom remedial training, occupational skill training, on the job training, summer youth employment and training program, as well as a variety of supportive services.

During its first 242 years of implementation in the States of Hawaii and California and the first 6 months in the State of Washington, I am happy to report to you, Mr. Chairman, that this program has been successful at providing remedial and skill training, as well as unsubsidized job placement for hundreds of native Samoan Americans within three States.

Since the inception of the Samoan Employment and Training Program, a total of 1,923 native Samoans have been served in three States. Of that number, 471 have been successfully placed in unsubsidized employment.

Unfortunately, Mr. Chairman, this number represents only a fraction of our population who are in need of specialized assistance provided by this funding. An official report and the programmatic results will be presented to you at a later time by one of the other witnesses, I believe.

The existing problems faced by native Sam uans will never be alleviated as more and more of our people continue to migrate to the State of Hawaii and the U.S. mainland. These people also encounter the same obstacles, such as lack of education and proficiency in the English language, as well as cultural barriers.

The regular JTPA program, a program designed to serve the economically disadvantaged, significantly underserves the native Samoan populations. Mr. Chairman, in order for native Samoans to become productive members of their respective communities and to continue to overcome the barriers faced by our people, it is imperative that funding for the Samoan employment program be continued, as well as increased, so that more people can be served in the next fiscal year.

The State of Hawaii, being the first point of arrival for most native Samoans, needs additional funding to serve more people in the upcoming fiscal year. The State of California, which houses the largest migrant population from Samoa, needs more funding to expand its services to other high-risk communities.

The State of Washington is also in need of an increase in funding in order for them to expand their services. The Samoan program in Washington can only serve 75 people for this program year at the current level of funding.

I urge you, Mr. Chairman and distinguished members of the committee, to continue your support, as I have always appreciated the support that I have received over the years.

Mr. Chairman, this concludes my statement, and if I may I would just like toit would be considered rude if I do not say a few words in the Samoan language to you, Mr. Chairman, and then hopefully that the spirits of our people are here with us and knowing that this is a very serious occasion, hope ully that by these opportunities given to not only the Samoans and the Hawaiian communities to see that their economic and social conditions improve.

[Speaks in Samoan.)

PREPARED STATEMENT

Mr. Chairman, that concludes my statement in Samoan. But once again, I just cannot thank you enough, and your colleagues Senator Inouye, Patsy Mink, and Neil Abercrombie, the members of the Hawaii delegation, for all the support they have given over the years with the social and economic needs of the Samoan community, whether they reside in Hawaii or California, as well as in the State of Washington.

I appreciate the help and your kokua, and again I send you my fondest aloha, and thank you again.

[The statement follows:]

STATEMENT OF HON. ENI F.H. FALEOMAVAEGA Mr. Chairman and members of the subcommittee. Thank you for the opportunity to appear before your committee today during this special hearing regarding the funding needs of Hawaii, as well as Pacific Basin programs.

It is always a great honor for me to address the distinguished members of this committee who have done so much to address the educational, employment and health needs in Hawaii and within the Pacific Basin, especially the employment and training needs of the native Samoan Americans residing in the States of Hawaii, California and Washington. I want to personally extend to you, once again, my gratitude and appreciation for your efforts and leadership, which resulted in the appropriation in fiscal year 1989, for the first time, of Federal funds to provide job training and related assistance programs for native Samoan Americans residing in these three States.

Mr. Chairman, today I would like to specifically address the JTPA Samoan employment and training program. Last year, I appeared before your committee to testify in support of continued funding for the Samoan employment and training program which is funded under title IV D of the Job Training Partnership Act. During my testimony, I shared with you and members of this committee some very critical statistical data concerning the plight of native Samoan Americans who live in the United States.

As members of this committee are aware, of all the minority groups in the United States, the native Samoan Americans suffer the most economically, primarily due to educational, cultural and language barriers.

The relevant 1990 census figures will not be released until next month; however, the 1980 census shows that the national per capita income of native Samoan Americans was $3,573. During the same time, native Samoan Americans living in Hawaii received far less than any ethnic group surveyed, with a per capita income of $2,700. 37.5 percent of native Samoan Americans in Hawaii lived at poverty level as opposed to 7.8 percent of the total state population. In regards to the native Sa. moan Americans residing in California, 21 percent lived at poverty level as opposed to 8.7 percent of the total population. In the State of Washington, 58 percent of the native Samoans live at or below the poverty level as opposed to 26.4 percent of the total State population. Additionally; native Samoans are above only the American Indians with the second to the lowest high school graduation rate in the State of Washington. It is also a known fact that a significant percentage of our people are affected by chronic unemployment and under-employment and are recipients of wel. fare assistance. There is a general lack of basic skills and English proficiency, and a growing rate of substance abuse, domestic violence and gang affiliation.

Mr. Chairman, when the Bureau of the Census releases their report on the 1990 census, I am sure the status of the native Samoan Americans living in the United States will remain discouraging. This is truly a population at risk, living at or below the poverty line.

Since its inception in 1989, the JTPA Samoan employment and training program has begun to address employment and training needs of our people through geted training programs such as pre-employment and classroom remedial training, occupational skill training, on-the-job training, summer youth employment and training programs as well as a variety of supportive services.

During its first two and a half years of implementation in the States of Hawaii and California, and the first six months in the State of Washington, I am happy to report to you, Mr. Chairman, that this program has been successful in providing remedial and skill training as well as unsubsidized job placement for hundreds of native Samoan Americans within the three states.

In program year 1988, a total of 258 participants were served in the state of Hawaii with 25 placed in unsubsidized employment. 237 were served in California with a total of 113 placements. For both states, a total of 495 were served with 138 being placed in unsubsidized jobs. For program year 1989, 329 people were served in Hawaii with 88 successful job placements. 381 were enrolled in California in the same year with 171 placements in employment. Total enrollment for 1989 for both states was 720 with a total of 259 successful job placements. For the current program year 1990, 191 have been served to date in Hawaii, 22 of whom have been placed in jobs. In California, 257 have been enrolled to date with a total of 42 unsubsidized job placements. The program was also launched in the state of Washington in September of 1990. 50 people have been served in Washington to date, 10 of whom have been placed in jobs. Total enrollment for the three states during this current program year is 508, 74 of whom have been employed.

Since the inception of the Samoan emplo nent and training program, a total of 1,923 native Samoan Americans have been served in the three states. Of that number 471 have been successfully placed in unsubsidized employment.

Unfortunately, Mr. Chairman, this number represents only a fraction of our population who are in need of specialized assistance provided by this funding. An official report on the programmatic resulte will be presented to you at a later time by one of the witnesses.

The existing problems faced by the native Samoan Americans will never be allevi. ated as more and more of our people continue to migrate to the State of Hawaii and the mainland United States. These people will also encounter the same obstacles such as the lack of education and proficiency in the English language, as well as cultural barriers. The regular JTPA program, a program designed to serve the economically-disadvantaged, significantly under-serves the native Samoan American population.

Mr. Chairman, in order for native Samoan Americans to become productive members of their respective communities, and to continue to overcome the barriers faced by our people, it is imperative that funding for the Samoan employment and train. ing program be continued, as well as incre: d, so that more people can be served in the next fiscal years.

The State of Hawaii, being the first point arrival for most native Samoan Americans needs additional funding to serve more sople in the upcoming fiscal year. The state of California, which houses the largest migrant population from American Samoa, needs more funding to expand its services to other high-risk communities. The State of Washington is also in need of an increase in funding in order for them to expand their services to other counties with large concentrations of native Samoan Americans. The Samoan program in Washington can only serve 75 people for this program year at the current level of funcing.

I am urging you Mr. Chairman, and disti: guished members of this committee, to continue your support for the JTPA Samoan employment and training program.

Thank you Mr. Chairman.

Senator AKAKA. Chairman Inouye and this committee thank you very much for your testimony, and I know this will be helpful in the committee's deliberations. Thank you.

Mr. FALEOMAVAEGA. Mr. Chairman, I would love to stay longer, but as you know how things go, I have got about three other committee hearings I have to run to. But thank you again very much.

STATEMENT OF LASALLE LEFFALL, M.D., PAST PRESIDENT, AMER

ICAN CANCER SOCIETY Senator AKAKA. At this time I would line to call Dr. LaSalle Leffall.

While he is preparing to give his testimony, I just want to say again that I am privileged to be sitting in this seat. Senator Inouye, chairman of this subcommittee, will be here shortly, and I would tell you an anecdote.

Coming from the House, there is a huge difference in time. On this side, we have to be in three places at he same time, and as a result I should tell you I opened the Senate this morning and ran to this meeting to try to get here by 9:30, and I am supposed to be opening another committee at 9:30 and I am here.

So just to tell you how busy all Senators are. But Senator Inouye will be here shortly.

At this time we welcome Dr. LaSalle Lesfall of the American Cancer Society. We have your statement and the subcommittee welcomes you. Please proceed.

Dr. LEFFALL. Good morning, Senator Akaka. I am Dr. LaSalle Leffall, past president of the American Cancer Society.

The American Cancer Society is a neighborhood-based voluntary Hawaii agency that neither solicits nor receives Government fund

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