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Isoionic isotope exchange with hydroxylapatite and the dilution

effect, D. N. Misra, J. Res. Nat. Bur. Stand. (U.S.), 84, No. 5, 395-406 (Sept.-Oct. 1979).

Key words: dilution effect, at same pH and concentration; hydration shell, role of; hydroxylapatite, at different pHs; isotopic exchange, isoionic; recrystallization, role of; sur

face layer, role of. Isoionic isotope exchange data of Ca2+ and 32 PO,2 in a saturated solution with hydroxylapatite at 25 °C, collected by Avnimelech, have been reinterpreted on the basis that the processes consisted of three pools: hydration shell, surface layer and “recrystallization of crystallites." These processes are regarded as strictly separable. This theoretically allows: (i) a quantitative evaluation of the constants involved in the processes; (ii) an estimation of the exchange capacities of hydration and surface layers (fast pools) which may be pH-dependent; and (iii) a determination of the isoionic exchange rate constants. The constants are essentially the same for Ca2+ and PO,. at a given pH if the cross-sectional areas of the ions are taken as 23 Å2 and 33 Årespectively; they, perhaps, increase linearly with the hydrogen ion concentration of the solutions.

The effects of three consecutive abrupt dilutions of the radioactive ions without changing the concentrations (or pH) of the nonradioactive components of the solution are predictable by a mathematical model based on the complete reversibility of the two fast pools and the kinetics of the irreversible third pool.

were obtained by poling at the highest fields and poling to breakdown. A pyroelectric activity of 36 MCK-m-2 was measured two weeks after poling with a nominal field of 550 MVm-' for a nominal poling time of 10 s (reduced by multiple breakdown). The highest activity obtained with no apparent breakdown (31 UCK-m-?) was measured a week after poling with a field of 400 MVm- for 10 s. These values are comparable with the highest that have been reported for this material using any poling temperature or using corona poling. Generators for discrete polynomial L, approximation problems,

P. Domich, J. Lawrence, and D. Shier, J. Res. Nat. Bur. Stand. (U.S.), 84, No. 6, 455-488 (Nov.-Dec. 1979).

Key words: algorithm testing; approximation; computational experiment; least absolute deviation; polynomial ap

proximation; test problems. Polynomial approximation problems represent a class of specially structured problems which are frequently encountered in empirical curve-fitting. Two generators for creating such problems have been developed, implemented and used in the testing of discrete L, approximation codes. Both generators permit automatic generation of problems with specified characteristics and (for one generator) having known, unique and controllable solutions.

A graph coloring algorithm for large scheduling problems, F. T.

Leighton, J. Res. Nat. Bur. Stand. (U.S.), 84, No. 6, 489-506 (Nov.-Dec. 1979).

November-December 1979

Molecular dynamics study of liquid rubidium and the Lennard

Jones fluid, R. D. Mountain and S. W. Haan, J. Res. Nat. Bur. Stand. (U.S.), 84, No. 6, 439-446 (Nov.-Dec. 1979).

Key words: algorithm; chromatic number; color function; graph; graph coloring; heuristic; interchange; random test

graphs; scheduling; time complexity. A new graph coloring algorithm is presented and compared to a wide variety of known algorithms. The algorithm is shown to exhibit O(n) time behavior for most sparse graphs and thus is found to be particularly well suited for use with large-scale scheduling problems. In addition, a procedure for generating large random test graphs with known chromatic number is presented and is used to evaluate heuristically the capabilities of the algorithms discussed.

Key words: intermediate scattering function; LennardJones liquid; liquid rubidium; molecular dynamics; radial distribution function; transverse current correlation func

tion; velocity autocorrelation function. Molecular dynamics calculations were made for three thermodynamic states of a model of liquid rubidium and for two states of the Lennard-Jones fluid in order to investigate the influence of density, temperature and interatomic potential on the spectra of density fluctuations in these fluids. Here the results for the intermediate scattering function, the radial distribution function, the velocity autocorrelation function of the transverse momentum autocorrelation function are presented in tabular form. The procedures employed in this study are discussed and the major features of these functions are described.

Room temperature poling of poly(vinylidene fluoride) with

deposited metal electrodes, J. M. Kenney and S. C. Roth, J. Res. Nai. Bur. Stand. (U.S.), 84, No. 6, 447-453 (Nov.-Dec. 1979).

Key words: dielectric strength; electrets; piezoelectricity; polarization; poling procedures; polymers; poly(vinylidene

fluoride); pyroelectricity; transducers. High values of pyroelectric and piezolectric activity in fullyelectroded films of poly(vinylidene fluoride) were obtained by "conventional" (non-corona) poling at room temperature with sufficiently high fields. The avoidance of breakdown while obtaining high activity requires an understanding of the time dependence of both breakdown and activity. Time-to-breakdown as a function of field, and room-temperature pyroelectric activity (7-14 days after poling at 23.5 °C) as a function of poling time and field were obtained for 25-um biaxially stretched films with evaporated aluminum electrodes. The highest activities

5.2. PAPERS FROM THE JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL REFERENCE

DATA, VOLUME 8, JANUARY-DECEMBER 1979

This journal is published quarterly by the American Chemical coherent (Rayleigh) scattering cross sections, obtained by nuSociety and the American Institute of Physics for the National merical integration of the Thomson formula weighted by Bureau of Standards. The objective of the Journal is to provide F(x,Z), are presented for all elements Z=1 to 100, for critically evaluated physical and chemical property data, fully photon energies 100 eV (A = 124 Å = 12.4 nm) to 100 MeV documented as to the original sources and the criteria used for (A = 0.000 124 À = 12.4 fm). Departures from the nonevaluation. Critical reviews of measurement techniques, whose relativistic coherent scattering cross sections tabulated in J. aim is to assess the accuracy of available data in a given techni- Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 4, 471 (1975) are less than 1% for Z cal area, are also included. The principal source for the Journal < 20. However for a high-Z element such as lead, for example, is the National Standard Reference Data System (NSRDS). The the relativistic coherent scattering cross section is systematiJournal is not intended as a publication outlet for original ex- cally higher by less than 0.4% below I keV, by 8% at 100 keV perimental measurements such as are normally reported in the and by 13% above I MeV. primary research literature, nor for review articles of a descriptive or primarily theoretical nature.

Microwave spectra of molecules of astrophysical interest. XIV.

Vinyl cyanide (Acrylonitrile), M. C. L. Gerry, K. Yamada,

and G. Winnewisser, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 1, 107Volume 8, No. 1

124 (1979). Energy levels of titanium, Ti i through Ti XXII, C. Corliss and Key words: interstellar molecules; microwave spectra; J. Sugar, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 1, 1-62 (1979).

molecular parameters; radio astronomy; rotational transi

tions; vinyl cyanide. Key words: atomic energy levels; atomic spectra; titanium.

The available data of the microwave spectrum of vinyl cyaThe energy levels of the titanium atom in all of its stages of

nide are critically reviewed and tabulated. Molecular data such ionization, as derived from the analyses of atomic spectra, have

as rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, hyperbeen critically compiled. In cases where only line classifications

fine coupling constants, dipole moments, and structural are reported in the literature, level values have been derived.

parameters are tabulated. Rotational transitions from 400 MHz Term designations, experimental g-values, and ionization ener

to 200 GHz, which are likely to be of interest to radio astronogies are included. Calculated percentages of the two leading

my, are calculated and tabulated along with their estimated components of the eigenvectors of the levels are given.

95% confidence limits. The spectrum and energy levels of the neutral atom of boron (B

Molten salts: Volume 4, Part 4. Mixed halide melts, G. J. Janz, 1), G. A. Odintzova and A. R. Striganov, J. Phys. Chem. Ref.

R. P. T. Tomkins, and C. B. Allen, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data Data 8, No. 1, 63-68 (1979).

8, No. 1, 125-302 (1979). Key words: atomic energy levels; atomic spectra; boron.

Key words: bromides; chlorides; data compilation; density; The published data on the spectrum of the neutral atom of electrical conductance; fluorides; halides; iodides; molten boron are compiled and presented. In one table 164 lines in the salt mixtures; standard reference data; surface tension; range 36010-993 Å are listed with their intensities and classifi- viscosity. cations. A second table gives 92 levels with the numerical

Data on the electrical conductance, density, viscosity, and values of the energy.

surface tension of mixed halide melts have been systematically Relativistic atomic form factors and photon coherent scattering

collected and evaluated. Results are given for eighty-five binary cross sections, J. H. Hubbell and I. Øverbø, J. Phys. Chem.

mixtures over a range of compositions and temperatures. Ref. Data 8, No. 1, 69-106 (1979). Key words: atomic form factor; coherent scattering; cross

Volume 8, No. 2 sections; gamma rays; photons; Rayleigh scattering; tabula

Atomic radiative and radiationless yields for K and L shells, M. tions; x rays.

O. Krause, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 2, 307-328 Tabulations are presented of relativistic Hartree-Fock atomic (1979). form factors F(x,Z), for values of x(=sin(0/2)/1 from 0.01 to 10* Å-, for all elements Z = 1 to 100. For 2 = 1, F(x,2) is

Key words: atomic properties; Auger yield; Coster-Kronig

yield; effective fluorescence yield; fluorescence yield; K given by the exact expression of Pirenne. For 2 = 2 to 98, X

shell; L shell; non-radiative yield; partial level width; radia= 0.01 to 2.0 A-4, the tabulated values are those of Cromer and

tive yield. Waber given in the International Tables for X-Ray Crystallog-' raphy (Vol. IV, 1974), based in part on the work of Doyle and The available body of information on (a) fluorescence, Turner. For 2 = 21 to 92, x = 2.2 to 6.0 Å-4, the present tables Auger, and Coster-Kronig yields, (b) radiative and radiationless are based on the values of Doyle and Turner and additional transition rates, (c) level widths, (d) x-ray and Auger line values (Z = 44, 60, 68, and 74) as given by Øverby. For Z = widths, (e) x-ray and Auger spectra, and (f) Coster-Kronig 3 to 20, x = 2.2 to 45 Å-., and 2 = 21 to 92, x = 6.2 to 45 A- energies has been used to generate an internally consistent set the tables are interpolated from values given for 36 elements of values of atomic radiative and radiationless yields for the K by Øverbo, extended to x = 10° Å-- using Øverby's corrections shell (5<25 110) and the L subshells (12 <2<110). Values to the Bethe-Levinger K-shell expression. The remainder of the of fluorescence yields wai WJwg, wg, Coster-Kronig yields su table is filled in by interpolation and extrapolation, guided for fis, fine fier for Auger yields ax, as, as, as, and effective high r-values by the Bethe-Levinger result. Tables of relativistic fluorescence yields v, and vg are presented in tables and graphs.

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Estimates of uncertainties are given. Updated and expanded graphs of partial and total widths of K, L,, L2, and Lg levels are presented as well as a reference list of papers published since about 1972.

Natural widths of atomic K and L levels, Kæ x-ray lines and

several KLL Auger lines, M. O. Krause and J. H. Oliver, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 2, 329-338 (1979).

Key words: Auger effect; Auger line width; K shell; level

width; line width; L shell; natural width; x-ray line width. Semi-empirical values of the natural widths of K, L1, L2 and 4 levels, Ka, and Kay X-ray lines, and KL,L,, KL;L and KLL, Auger lines for the elements 10 <2<110 are presented in tables and graphs. Level width ri(i = K, L,, L2, L3) is obtained from the relation T, = Tx,1W to using the theoretical radiative rate Tr. from Scofield's relativistic, relaxed Hartree-Fock calculation and the fluorescence yield w, from Krause's evaluation. X-ray and Auger line widths are calculated as the sums of pertinent level widths. This tabulation of natural level and line widths is internally consistent, and is compatible with all relevant experimental and theoretical information. Present semiempirical widths, especially those of Ka, and Ka, x-rays, are compared with measured widths. Uncertainties of semi-empirical values are estimated.

Vapor pressures and boiling points of selected halomethanes, A.

P. Kudchadker, S. A. Kudchadker, R. P. Shukla, and P. R Patnaik, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 2, 499-518 (1979).

Key words: Antoine equation; enthalpy of vaporization, halomethanes; vapor pressure-boiling point data; Wagner

equation. This critical review is a study of the vapor pressure-boiling point data from the triple point to the critical point for CH.XQ (X = Br, 1) and CHra+b+c+d) F,Cl.Brela halomethanes. The available data are carefully analyzed and the "best" data selected. The selection procedure is discussed. Uncertainties in the selected temperatures and pressures are reported. The selected data were fitted to the Antoine equation for data up to 1500 mm Hg pressure and the Wagner equation for data up to the critical point. Antoine constants for nineteen compounds and the Wagner constants for five compounds are reported. The enthalpy of vaporization at 298.15 K and at the normal boiling point have been computed.

Electrical resistivity of alkali elements, T. C. Chi, J. Phys. Chem.

Ref. Data 8, No. 2, 339-438 (1979).

Ideal gas thermodyna properties of selected bromoethanes

and iodoethane, S. A. Kudchadker and A. P. Kudchadker, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 2, 519-526 (1979).

Key words: bromoethanes; ideal gas thermodynamic properties; internal rotation; iodoethane; potential barrier

heights; symmetric top; torsional frequencies. The available molecular parameters, fundamental frequencies, potential barrier heights, torsional frequencies, and standard enthalpies of formation at 298.15 K for selected bromoethanes and iodoethane containing one symmetric-top group have been critically evaluated and recommended values selected. The chemical thermodynamic properties in the ideal gas state at one atmosphere pressure using the rigid-rotor harmonic-oscillator approximation have been calculated for CH,CH,Br, CH,CHBrg, CH,CBrg, C,Bre, and CH CH.I. The internal rotational contributions have been obtained from the partition function formed by the summation of internal rotation

on

Key words: alkali elements; cesium; electrical resistivity; francium; lithium; magnetic flux density dependence; potassium; pressure dependence; rubidium; sodium; tem

perature dependence. This paper presents and discusses the available data and information the electrical resistivity of alkali elements (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, and francium) and contains recommended reference values (or provisional or typical values). The compiled data include all the experimental data available from the literature and cover the temperature dependence, pressure dependence, and magnetic flux density dependence. The temperature range covered by the compiled data is from cryogenic temperatures to above the critical temperature of the elements. The recommended values generated from critical evaluation, analysis, and synthesis of the available data and information and are given for both the total electrical resistivity and the intrinsic electrical resistivity. For most of the elements, the recommended values cover the temperature range from I K to 2000 K.

energy levels.

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Thermodynamic properties of normal and deuterated

naphthalenes, S. S. Chen, S. A. Kudchadker, and R. C. Wilhoit, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 2, 527-536 (1979).

Key words: enthalpy of formation; ideal gas thermodynamic properties; molecular structure; normal and deuterated

naphthalenes; vibrational assignments. Structural and spectroscopic data and the standard enthalpy of formation at 298.15 K for C, Hg, a-C,H,D, B-C,H,D, and CODwere reviewed. The selected values were utilized to calculate the ideal gas thermodynamic properties in the temperature range 0 to 1500 K, using the rigid rotor and harmonic oscillator model. The comparison between the third law entropies and the spectroscopically calculated entropies of C,H, was studied. The agreement is satisfactory within the experimental uncertainties.

Electrical resistivity of alkaline earth elements, T. C. Chi, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 2, 439-498 (1979).

Key words: alkaline earth elements; barium; beryllium; calcium; electrical resistivity; magnesium; radium; strontium;

temperature dependence. This paper presents and discusses the available data and information on the electrical resistivity of alkaline earth elements (beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, and radium) and contains recommended or provisional reference values. The compiled data include all the experimental data available from the literature. The temperature range covered by the compiled data is from cryogenic temperatures to above the melting temperature of the elements. The recommended values are generated from critical evaluation, analysis, and synthesis of the available data and information and are given for both the total electrical resistivity and the intrinsic electrical resistivity. For most of the elements, the recommended values cover the temperature range from 1 K to 1000 K.

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A correlation of the viscosity and thermal conductivity data of

gaseous and liquid propane, P. M. Holland and H. J. M. Hanley, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 2, 559-576 (1979).

Key words: correlated data; critical point enhancement;

data evaluation; propane; thermal conductivity; viscosity. Data for the viscosity and thermal conductivity of gaseous and liquid propane have been evaluated and represented by empirical functions developed in previous work. Tables of values are presented for the range 140-500 K for pressures to 50 MPa (~ 500 atm). The viscosities are estimated to have uncertainties of about + 5%, with corresponding uncertainties of the thermal conductivities of about 18%. It is stressed that the data base should be improved. As in our work with other fluids, the anomalous contribution to the thermal conductivity in the vicinity of the critical point is included.

Critically evaluated rate constants for gaseous reactions of

several electronically excited species, K. Schofield, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 3, 723-798 (1979).

Key words: activation energies; electronically excited states; evaluation; gaseous interactions; molecular correlations; quenching; radiative lifetimes; rate constants; reactive channels; recommended data; relaxation processes;

review. An extensive evaluation is presented of the available gas phase chemical kinetic rate constants for the interactions of the low lying electronic states of several atoms and molecules with numerous collision partners. These include the following excited states: C(2'D2,2'S.), N(24D312,5/2,22P 1/2.312), P(3D312. 5/2,3-P119.312), S(3'D2,3'S.), Se( 4°P.,4'D2,4'S.). Tel 5*P1.0,5'D2, 5'S.), CO(all,a''E+, A,CE-, A'II), CS(a’NI,A'II), OH(A?£), OD(APX+), O,(c' ,,CA.AZ*,B2,), and Sz(a'4,,b'£,*, A *2.4,882,-). Wherever possible, recommended values are suggested. Much of the data refers only to room temperature. To facilitate the evaluation, collision-free radiative lifetimes often have been required. These also have been evaluated and are presented. The mechanisms of the interactions and the various potential kinetic channels are discussed. These include such processes as. chemical reactions, electronic quenching to the ground electronic state, electronic cross relaxation to an adjacent excited state, and for molecules, vibrational and rotational relaxation processes within the excited state. A complete coverage of the literature published prior to 1978 has been attempted.

Volume 8, No. 3

Microwave spectra of molecules of astrophysical interest. XVI.

Methyl formate, A. Bauder, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 3, 583-618 (1979).

Key words: internal rotation; interstellar molecules; line strengths; methyl formate; microwave spectrum; radio astronomy; rotational transitions.

The microwave spectrum of methyl formate is critically reviewed for information applicable to radio astronomy. The review is based on new laboratory measurements in the frequency range from 8 GHz to 58 GHz. Molecular data such as the derived rotational constants, centrifugal distortion parameters, internal rotation parameters, electric dipole moment and molecular structure are tabulated. Since the primary objective is to provide microwave spectral transitions applicable to radio astronomy observations, the review encompasses only the ground state rotational spectrum of the most abundant isotopic form of methyl formate, H"C'90,''CH,. While all measured transitions are included, the predicted transitions were limited to J = 12 in the range of 900 MHz to 250 GHz.

A review, evaluation, and correlation of the phase equilibria,

heat of mixing, and change in volume on mixing for liquid mixtures of methane + ethane, M. J. Hiza, R. C. Miller, and A. J. Kidnay, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 3, 799-816 (1979).

Key words: binary mixtures; data correlation; excess volumes; heat of mixing; liquid-vapor equilibria; methane

+ ethane. The available experimental data for liquid equilibria, heat of mixing, and change in volume on mixing for the methane + ethane system have been reviewed and where possible evaluated for consistency. The derived properties chosen for analysis and correlation were liquid mixture excess Gibbs energies, Henry's constants, and K values. Data sets, selected on the basis of the consistency tests applied, were correlated as functions of temperature and composition to provide internally consistent sets of property values suitable for engineering design calculations.

Molecular structures of gas-phase polyatomic molecules deter

mined by spectroscopic methods, M. D. Harmony, V. W. Laurie, R. L. Kuczkowski, R. H. Schwendeman, D. A. Ramsay, F. J. Lovas, W. J. Lafferty, and A. G. Maki, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 3, 619-722 (1979).

Key words: bond angles; bond distances; gas-phase polyatomic molecules; gas-phase spectroscopy; microwave spectroscopy; molecular conformation; molecular spec

troscopy; molecular structure; molecules; structure. Spectroscopic data related to the structures of polyatomic molecules in the gas phase have been reviewed, critically evaluated, and compiled. All reported bond distances and angles have been classified as equilibrium (re), average (re), substitution (r,), or effective (r.) parameters, and have been given a quality rating which is a measure of the parameter uncertainty. The surveyed literature includes work from all of the areas of gas-phase spectroscopy from which precise quantitative structural information can be derived. Introductory material includes definitions of the various types of parameters and a description of the evaluation procedure.

Energy levels of aluminum, Al 1 through Al xii, W. C. Martin

and R. Zalubas, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 3, 817-864 (1979).

Key words: aluminum; atomic energy levels; atomic spec

tra; electron configurations; ionization potentials. Energy level data are given for the atom and all positive ions of aluminum (Z = 13). These data have been critically compiled, mainly from published material on measurements and analyses of the optical spectra. We have derived or recalculated the levels for a number of the ions. In addition to the level value in cm- and the parity, the J value and the configuration and term assignments are listed if known. Leading percentages from the calculated eigenvectors are tabulated wherever available. Ionization energies are given for all spectra.

Energy levels of calcium, Ca i through Ca xx, J. Sugar and C. Corliss, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 3, 865-916 (1979).

Key words: atomic energy levels; atomic spectra; calcium energy levels.

The energy levels of the calcium atom in all of its stages of ionization, as derived from the analyses of atomic spectra, have been critically compiled. In cases where only line classifications are reported in the literature, level values have been derived. Electron configurations, term designations, J-values, experimental 8-values, and ionization energies are included. Calculated percentages of the two leading components of the eigenvectors of the levels are given.

Microwave spectra of molecules of astrophysical interest. XV

Dimethyl ether, F. J. Lovas, H. Lutz, and H. Dreizler, J. Ph Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 4, 1051-1108 (1979).

Key words: dimethyl ether; internal rotation; interstel molecules; microwave spectrum; radio astronomy; ro tional transitions.

Simplification of thermodynamic calculations through dimension

less entropies, K. S. Pitzer and L. Brewer, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 3, 917-920 (1979).

Key words: dimensionless entropies; thermodynamic functions.

The advantages of using thermodynamic quantities divided by the gas constant (H/R, G/R, etc.) in calculations are described. It is recommended that thermodynamic tables be presented in this form, so that the entries are either dimensionless or in units of kelvins.

The microwave spectrum of dimethyl et (methoxymethane) is critically reviewed and supplemen through calculations which include the contributions of inter rotation and centrifugal distortion in the molecular Hamilt an. The primary objective of this review is to prou microwave spectral transitions applicable to molecular radio tronomy for the ground vibrational state rotational spectrun the most abundant isotopic form of dimethyl ether, "CH, 12CHg. While all measured rotational transitions are incluc the predicted transition frequencies were limited to J = 1! the range 1 GHz to 300 GHz. In order to provide a comp summary of the laboratory studies on dimethyl ether, the ro tional constants of the less abundant isotopic species excited torsional states are also tabulated and all reported ri tional studies are referenced.

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Volume 8, No. 4

Energy levels of potassium, K i through K XIX, C. Corliss :

J. Sugar, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 4, 1109-1 (1979).

Key words: atomic energy levels; atomic spectra; potassi energy levels.

Evaluated activity and osmotic coefficients for aqueous solutions:

Iron chloride and the bi-univalent compounds of nickel and cobalt, R. N. Goldberg, R. L. Nuttall, and B. R. Staples, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 4, 923-1004 (1979).

Key words: activity coefficient; cobalt; critical evaluation; electrolyte; excess Gibbs energy; iron; nickel; osmotic coef

ficients; solutions; thermodynamic properties. A critical evaluation of the mean activity and osmotic coefficients in aqueous solutions of iron chloride, nickel chloride, perchlorate, and nitrate and twenty-nine bi-univalent compounds of cobalt at 298.15 K is presented. Osmotic coefficients were calculated from direct vapor pressure measurements, from isopiestic measurements, from freezing point depression measurements, and from vapor pressure osmometry measurements. Given are empirical coefficients for three different correlating equations, obtained by a weighted least squares fit of the experimental data, and tables consisting of the activity coefficients of the compounds, the osmotic coefficients and activity of water, and the excess Gibbs energy of the solution as functions of the molality for each electrolyte system. The literature coverage is through the computerized version of Chemical Abstracts of April 1979.

Data on the energy levels of the potassium atom in all of stages of ionization, as derived from the analyses of ator spectra, have been critically compiled. In cases where only I classifications are reported in the literature, level values hi been derived. Electron configurations, term designations, values, experimental 8-values, and ionization energies are cluded.

Electrical resistivity of copper, gold, palladium, and silver, R.

Matula, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 4, 1147-12 (1979).

Evaluated activity and osmotic coefficients for aqueous solutions:

Bi-univalent compounds of lead, copper, manganese, and uranium, R. N. Goldberg, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, No. 4, 1005-1050 (1979).

Key words: activity coefficient; copper; critical evaluation; electrolyte; excess Gibbs energy; lead; manganese; osmotic

coefficients; solutions; thermodynamic properties; uranium. A critical evaluation of the mean activity and osmotic coefficients in aqueous solutions of twelve bi-univalent compounds of lead, copper, manganese and uranium at 298.15 K is presented. Osmotic coefficients were calculated from direct vapor pressure measurements, from isopiestic measurements and from freezing point depression measurements. Activity coefficients were calculated from electromotive force measurements on galvanic cells without transference. Given are empirical coefficients for three different correlating equations, obtained by a weighted least squares fit of the experimental data, and tables consisting of the activity coefficients of the compounds, the osmotic coefficients and activity of water, and the excess Gibbs energy of the solution as functions of the molality for each electrolyte system. The literature coverage is through the computerized version of Chemical Abstracts of April 1979.

Key words: copper; critical evaluation; data analysis; d: compilation; data evaluation; data extraction; data synth is; electrical resistivity; elements; gold; metals; moli metals; palladium; precious metals; reference data; silv

solid state physics; transport properties. In this work, recommended values for the electrical resistiv as a function of temperature from the cryogenic region to w beyond the melting point are given for bulk pure copper, go palladium, and silver. In addition to the total electrical resisti ty values for the solid state, intrinsic electrical resistivity valu are presented from cryogenic temperatures to the melti point. The values are corrected for the change in geometry d to thermal expansion. The recommendations are based theoretical considerations and on the experimental data fou in the open literature. That available experimental de together with information pertaining to the specimen char: terization and measurement conditions are included in t work. The methods of data evaluation and other consideratic used in arriving at the recommendations are described. For 1 solid state, an interpolation scheme is given to aid in the det mination of values between those supplied in the tables; for liquid state, equations are given.

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