Page images
PDF
EPUB

Total days absence from port for U.S. tuna fleet 1971-Sept. 1973*

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][subsumed][subsumed][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Estimated total gallons of fuel annually used by U.S. tuna fleet 1971-Sept. 1973*

[blocks in formation]

Special note.-Table I assumes that for seiners

400 S/T carrying capacity a daily fuel consumption of 3,000 gallons; for seiners <400 S/T 1,200 gallons; for Baitboats >100 S/T, 500 gallons; for Baitboats <100 S/T, 250 gallons.

Table II assumes that for seiners >400 S/T daily fuel consumption of 1,800 gallons; for seiners <400 S/T, 1,000 gallons. No change for Baitboats.

*Does not include 1973 African trips.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Senator TUNNEY. Thank you very much, Augie. Mr. Bolin, do you have any remarks you would care to make to augment Mr. Felando's

remarks?

STATEMENT OF JACK BOLIN, PRESIDENT, WESTERN FISHBOAT OWNERS' ASSOCIATION

Mr. BOLIN. Just one or two, Senator. He has covered all problems, the whole fishing industry's problems, I think very well.

Where ours differ, our boats are much smaller. We don't have the volume, of course, of fuel that the tuna seiners needs, but our boats range from Mexico up to Vancouver Island to Queen Charlotte, and our season on the albacore is a very short season for fishing. It's approximately 4 months, starts in July and would normally end somewhere at the end of October, mid-November.

Now, we don't know whether the fish are going to show up off Southern California this year.

The last 2 years they've been off Oregon, Washington, and Canada, the main body of fish, where our fishing boats have been, so our boats, basically, in 1972, were fishing off-had their fuel allocations up in Washington, Oregon, and possibly in Canada, and so if the fish show off San Diego or central California, then what do we do as far as getting the fuel down here; their allocation is possibly up north, and they use a variety of dealers. They don't all use Standard or Union.

Whatever port they're in, if there a Union dealer, they'll use Union or Shell or whatever, and all your ports don't have the-you know, everybody's distributor, so they have that problem of having an allocation with Standard and, yet, you go into a port, there's not a Standard facility. How do they get fuel to them, and it is very critical due to the short season of the albacore that our fishermen have to stay on the fish as much as possible, and if they have to come in and wait 2 or 3 weeks to get a special allocation, or anything, it could be a disaster for them, particularly, if that 3 weeks happened to be when the fish were biting, you know, so, really, it's-we have the same problem that Mr. Felando so aptly described, just smaller. Our boats we have boats that range from 30 feet long, carry 5 tons of fish, up to a 115 foot, 240-ton carrying capacity, and their value is from $30,000, say, up to $700,000.

Senator TUNNEY. Have you been able to work out those problems of being unable to get fuel in other ports when you have an allocation and a supplier in San Diego, but you do not necessarily have the same supplier along the coast?

Mr. BOLIN. Well, we don't know how this is going to work out right now, because our fishing season hasn't started now. Senator TUNNEY. I see.

Mr. BOLIN. We have 611 boats in our association and you can just double that, really, because we have a lot of people that don't belong to the association, of course, and the boats will start fishing, probably, like salmon fishing in April, they have two fisheries normally, but we represent them strictly on the albacore, but our boats will start in April fishing salmon. We have some boats now fishing

crab, but they're fishing out of their home ports, mainly now, so we won't know until this summer when the albacore arrive how this is going to work.

Now, our boats have had to deal with Standard, Union. I have several here that deal with all five companies, and they have to file those Form 17's with all five companies in hopes that they'll get fuel at these various ports that they were serviced in in 1972, and then we also have the new construction just like the big seiners that have to get their allocations.

Senator TUNNEY. Let me ask you a question regarding the language of the regulations that say the fishing industry will have 100 percent of current requirements.

Current requirements could mean requirements that the fishing industry itself feels are necessary or the requirements that the Federal Energy Office feels are necessary, with the Energy Office, perhaps, determining what conservation measures could be taken to cut back on requirements enabling the fishing fleet to still do the job and yet conserve fuel. Have you had any contact at all with the Energy Office as to what they mean by "current requirements," and what do you propose to do in order to guarantee that "current requirements” in fact means that amount of fuel that you feel is necessary to do the job?

Mr. FERLANDO. Well, Senator, 100-percent current requirements, to me, means that when the vessel comes in and it needs to fill up its tanks, that's what it's going to get and it will proceed out to sea, but I'll tell you what we plan to do. As soon as we've received copies of the new regulations as they apply to marine fuels, we're going to try to sit down with the oil dock operators and make sure that we both have an understanding of what that means.

We went through the same procedure in October and we found out that we read the same words, but we had different meanings, so we're going to try to find out just exactly what those words. mean, at least with the oil dock operators, and then hopefully in time with representatives of the Government, the Federal Energy Office, whether it be in Washington, D.C. or whether it be at the regional office, but, in answer to your questions, it means that when a vessel comes in-and the fuel capacity on board that vessel is very easy is determine, whether it's a new boat or an old customer-everyone knows what the tanks holds. Everyone knows the type of main engine or the auxiliary engine aboard. You can figure out the consumption rate very easily, daily consumption rate very easily on the basis of the horsepower of the engine, so we know that when a fellow comes in and asks for fuel that just doesn't reasonably represent what his capacity-his tank capacity aboard that vessel of his horsepower, everyone in the fleet knows he's just-there's something wrong, so we think that current needs are easy to determine.

Now, maybe we're wrong. Maybe somebody else will show that we are. However, I think they're going to have to show where our reasoning is incorrect.

We think that the meaning is clear, but, like I say, we will pursue the subject with the people who sell us the fuel.

Senator TUNNEY. We'll try to get an interpretation for you in the next day or two from the Federal Energy Office as to what they mean, but I'm afraid that sometimes the suppliers have a different interpretation than the representatives of the Federal Energy Office. We saw this in October, and I think it's conceivable that we will see it again. I hope not, but I think, at least, we can get an interpretation from the Federal Energy Office within the next couple of days as to what they mean by "current requirements."

Mr. Bolin, have you had any offers prior to the promulgation of the most recent regulations, which gave you 100-percent current requirements at prices that were higher than those listed by either the Federal Energy Office or Cost of Living Council as the ceiling for fuels in that range of distillates? Have you, in other words, had any offers to provide you with all the fuel or much of the fuel that you needs, but, which falls outside of the normal allocation processand, I suppose, could be called, in colloquial terms, black market oil or fuel?

Mr. BOLIN. Yes, Senator, we were having some problems getting some fuel for one or two of our vessels here in San Diego and John Farrina, the reporter for the San Diego Tribune, wrote a little article and happened to, of course, include my name.

We had it down in my office, the interview, and that evening, about 9:30, I guess, I got a phone call. A man introduced himself as a concerned American citizen and which he could have been legitimate, I don't know, but he was trying to help American industries get hard-to-obtain commodities, and he said that he had located 50,000 gallons of diesel fuel in Texas and that it was available, and that if we would like to have it, he said there was one hitch, it was a little more expensive than the local, and when he quoted the price of 55 cents a gallon, I said, "Yes, that's just a little over double," at that time. I think we were paying right at 21 or 23. This was just at during the holidays, and I probably should have taken his name, and all that, but I was-I just thought, "Well, here's the first of the big ripoffs," and decided to just hang up and told him we weren't interested, and so that is the only time I have been approached.

Now, he could have actually, like I said it, could have been a legitimate offer to try to help us out, but

Senator TUNNEY. Mr. Felando, do you know of any activities of this kind?

Mr. FELANDO. Well, we have received letters where boat owners have been asked to invest in an oil well and production of the oil well would eventually go to the vessels.

I thought that was sort of a unique approach towards the fuel crisis problem.

I have not received the type of personal contact that Mr. Bolin has, but we have-I have heard of offers of fuel in the range of millions of gallons at substantially higher prices, but I have not personally received any calls, and we have or I have was given the details with respect to a plan in the Canal one whereby the fuel would be provided to our vessels at a-I think it was 4 or 5 cents above the prevailing price per gallon in the Canal one; however,

« PreviousContinue »