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l'pon completion of these hearings and the receipt of requested materials, the Committee staff, in conjunction with the Science Policy Division of the Congressional Research Service and the office of the House Legislative Counsel, spent the next 6 months in reviewing the testimony and materials which the Committee had obtained and in making further informal investigations to fill some of the remaining informational gaps.

A bill was then drafted which attempted to incorporate all of the major policy and organizational features which had been recommended to the Committee and which appeared to have substantial support in one form or another. It was the intent, in drafting the bill, not to duck any of the major issues or recommendations which had been received, but to put them together in a reasonable format that would promote further serious thought and discussion.

On March 6, 1975, I introduced this bill, together with Mr. Mosher. It is H.R. 4461. I also released at that time an explanatory statement which undertook to describe the rationale behind the bill and which attempted to put it into proper perspective. We announced at that time our intent to hold full Committee hearings on the bill late in the spring.

CURRENT PHASE

Since the time of the introduction of H.R. 4461, the Committee has been busy preparing for the current hearings on the bill. We have been in close contact with the Administration and the Executive Office of the President on this matter for a number of months, seeking to elicit such preferences as the Administration might have and working toward getting its input and views on H.R. 4461.

Today our hearings will begin on H.R. 4461 and on an Administration bill which only recently has been received. We will seek commentary and viewpoints on both pieces of legislation and perhaps on some more general principles which may be involved as well. For the record, H.R. 4461 deals with (1) a statntory science policy, (2) a science advisory mechanism in the Executive Office of the Preisdent, (3) a new Federal department which would join certain agencies of the government whose functions are solely or primarily R&D, and (4) the absorption of the 3 major government science information offices into a single corporation.

The Administration bill deals only with the science advisory mechanism in the Executive Office.

When the hearings are completed and the Committee has had an opportunity to study the results, it is our expectation to report a bill to the House at the earliest feasible time.

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TITLE I-NATIONAL SCIENCE POLICY

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FINDINGS

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SEC. 101. (a) The Congress hereby finds and declares

(1) that the general welfare, the economic growth and stability of the Nation and its security, the efficient utilization and conservation of the Nation's resources, and the promotion of the progress of science and the useful arts, upon which the very functioning of government and society depend, require the vigorous and

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perceptive employment of national science and tech

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nology; and

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(2) that the complexity and inagnitude of scientific

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and technological factors impinging on the course of national and international events requires that provision

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be made to incorporate scientific and technological knowledge, selectively, into the national decisionmaking

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(b) As a consequence, the Congress hereby finds and

19 declares that the Nation's goals for science and technology

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(1) demonstrating world leadership by enlarging the contributions of American science and technology

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to the knowledge of man and his universe;

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(2) increasing the efficient use of essential materials

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and products, and generally contributing to economic

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opportunity, stability, and appropriate growth;

(3) contributing to the national security;
(4) improving the Nation's health and medical

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care;

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(5) preserving, fostering, and restoring a healthful

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and esthetic natural environment, housing, and urban

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systems; and

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(6) making the discoveries of science and tech

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11 SEC. 102. (a) In view of the foregoing, the Congress 15 declares that it is the policy of the United States to promote 16 the development of a national science policy which comprises 17 the following principles: 18

(1) the continuing formulation of a national strategy 19 as to the appropriate scope, level, directions, and extent 20 of science and technology efforts, based upon the continu21 ing study of the science and technology goals and policies 22 of the United States while drawing upon the views of 23 States, municipalities, and representative public groups; 24

(2) the enlistment of science and technology to 25

foster a healthy economy in which the directions of

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