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The Heads of the Departments, Agencies and Establishments of the Executive Branch of Government are therefore directed, consistent with the performance of their mission and the relevant legislation, to take into explicit and due account aircraft noise whenever it is relevant to any of their programs or to action in which they may participate, and to cooperate with the Secretaries of the Department of Transportation and the Department of Housing and Urban Development in efforts to control and reduce the problems of aircraft noise.

NOTE.—On the same day the White House Press Office made public a report to the President from Dr. Donald F. Hornig, Special Assistant to the President for Science and Technology, summarizing steps taken by him in collaboration with officials of the Federal Aviation Agency, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Department of Commerce, and the Department of Housing and Urban Development to frame a program to alleviate problems of aircraft noise in the vicinity of airports.

The cooperating agencies, the report said, had agreed on a program aimed at ascertaining how such noise can be reduced through design of engines and airframes, procedures and techniques of flight operations, and land use in the vicinity of airports. In furtherance of the program, the report continued, the Federal Aviation Agency had proposed legislation to authorize the Secretary of Transportation to certify new aircraft on the basis of noise as well as safety standards.

Dr. Hornig's report stated that in its first year of operation the program had "achieved an industry and governmentwide consensus" on two basic approaches to the problem of aircraft noise abatement : a generally accepted method of assessing human reaction to aircraft noise, and agreement that noise level as well as safety must be a criterion in aircraft certification.

The report is printed in the Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents (vol. 3, p. 527).

ATTACHMENT 4

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, D.C., August 25, 1967. Hon. ALAN F. BOYD, Secretary of Transportation, Washington, D.C.

DEAR ALAN: Thank you for your letter of August 3, 1967.

As you know, the President in his Transportation Message of March 2, 1967, directed me to work with the Administrators of the FAA and the NASA, and the Secretaries of the Department of Commerce and of Housing and Urban Development, to frame and conduct an Aircraft Noise Abatement Program. The present inter-agency program, and the tools for its continued development and management (the Policy Committee, the Program Evaluation and Development Committee (PEDC), and the Management Committee), were the result of this direction. The President concurs in the transfer of this responsibility, including the coordination of the efforts of the various agencies, to the Department of Transportation. Accordingly, as suggested by your letter, a first step in your take over of these responsibilities should be the assumption of the Chairmanship of the Policy Committee and of the PEDC by you or your designee. I would like to retain my membership in the Policy Committee, and designate Dr. N. E. Golovin of the Office of Science and Technology to represent me as an observer in the work of the PEDC and in the coordinating activities of the Management Committee.

Also, as you know, the OST Coordinating Committee on Sonic Boom Studies (CCSBS) has provided technical direction for the national program of studies concerning the nature, characteristics and effects of sonic booms on structures, animals and people. The Air Force has acted as Executive Agent for the program. I am quite agreeable to your assuming direction of the national program of sonic boom studies and, in particular, of having you or your designee become Chairman of the CCSBS. However, I believe OST participation in sonic boom studies should continue, and designate Dr. N. E. Golovin to be my representative on the CCSBS.

My experience suggests that progress of both the aircraft noise and sonic boom study programs will require your personal interest and occasionally your active participation. I suggested you begin your direction of them with this need clearly in mind. In addition, as you know, we have offered to collaborate with the British and French Governments in establishing sonic boom criteria. At this moment, we are committed to the British and French Directors of the Concorde project to make a proposal as to how we might best proceed. I assume you will take over this responsibility as well.

Since no future meetings have been scheduled, you are free to set the date
for the next meeting of each Committee under the sponsorship of your Office.
I will advise the Committee of the above change in the next day or two.
Sincerely,

DONALD F. HORNIG,
Special Assistant to the President

for Science and Technology.

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Coordination of Activities Relating to Potential Unconventional Automobile Engines.

Assistant Secretary for Systems Development and Technology.
Assistant Secretary for Administration.
Assistant Secretary for Environment and Urban Systems.
Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs.
Assistant Secretary Designated for Safety and Consumer Affairs.
Urban Mass Transportation Administrator.
Director, National Highway Safety Bureau.
Director, Transportation Systems Center.

The instant memorandum from the Secretary designates me as the Department's representative to coordinate our activities with HEW in the unconventional automobile engine R&D program area. In addition, the memorandum assigns to the responsibility for coordinating our own work focusing on potential unconventional automobile engines, including the economic and social impacts, as well as the technological considerations.

Accordingly, I am establishing a working group to lay out in greater depth ways by which this Department can carry out the responsibilities described by Chairman Train in his May 13 letter and accepted by the Secretary in his June 17 response. Please designate a member of your staff to serve on the working group and transmit his name to me by COD August 25. Dr. Richard D. Strombotne of my staff will represent me on the working group and serve as its leader. His extension is 13–27851.

The first meeting of the working group is scheduled for Thursday, August 27, 9:30 a.m., in conference room 8C.

With reference to the Federal program on unconventional automobile engines (now the Advanced Automobile Power Systems (AAPS) Program), the Secretary explicitly accepted the responsibility for:

"(1) taking the lead agency role with respect to the mass production phase of the program, and

“(2) monitoring HEW's efforts and advising that Department to assure that transportation considerations other than the emission characteristics are appropriately included in the total effort." Other topics for consideration by the working group will include:

1. socio-economic impacts of replacement of the internal combustion engine, and

2. the extent and nature of this Department's support for the Federal AAPS Program.

ROBERT M. CANNON, Jr.

MEMORANDUM
Subject: Unconventional Automobile Engine R. & D.
From: The Secretary
To: Assistant Secretary for Systems Development and Technology.

In my letter of June 17, 1970, to Chairman Train of the Council on Environmental Quality, I stated that I would designate a Departmental representative to coordinate our activities with HEW in the unconventional automobile engine R&D program area. I hereby designate you as this representative with the additional responsibility for internal coordination within the Department with the Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs, the Assistant Secretary for Environment and Urban Systems, the Director of the NHSB, and any other offices who may have interest in this particular program.

I would expect you to assign a member of your staff to serve as our technical expert to work directly with the HEW technical people on a day-to-day basis. I will look to you to coordinate our own work focusing on potential unconventional automobile engines as they relate not only to technological considerations but also to economic and social impacts.

The Assistant Secretary for Environment & Urban Systems will continue to serve as the Departmental liaison with HEW in the broad field of environmental policy.

ATTACHMENT 7
Hon. RUSSELL E. TRAIN
Chairman, Council on Environmental Quality,
Washington, D.C.

DEAR CHAIRMAN TRAIN: Under Secretary Boyce has asked me to reply to your letter of June 23, 1970 in his behalf.

You requested a representative from the Department of Transportation for your Advisory Committee on Advanced Power Systems and indicated a preference for Dr. Richard Strombetes of my staff. I agree with your suggestion and hereby appoint Dr. Strombetes as the Department of Transportation representative. His extension is 13-27361.

This Department expects to cooperate fully with you and the Department of Health, Education and Welfare along the lines of Secretary Volpe's letter of June 17, 1970 to achieve the objectives of the program on Unconventionally Powered Automobiles. Sincerely,

ROBERT H. CANNON, Jr., Assistant Secretary for Systems Development and Technology. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PROGRAM OF OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR

ENVIRONMENT AND URBAN SYSTEMS, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION 1. The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment and Urban Systems is a focal point for policy and program development, for coordination, and for education relating to environmental and urban transportation matters. The office seeks to encourage metropolitan areas to develop their own governmental institutional mechanisms for planning balanced transportation systems, for responding to a broad range of transportation needs within the communities, for facilitatig the development of integrated transportation systems, and for responding sensitively to the broad public and private concern for the preservation and enhancement of the quality of the environment.

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While this office has no laboratory, it has an Office of Environmental and Urban Research. The mission of this office is to improve the state of knowledge on the relationship between transportation and urban and environmental goals and problems, and to assist in the development of planning methods which will insure that national urban and environmental policies are effectively implemented through Federal transportation programs.

This office has a staff of fifteen people including nine professionals. 2. The field of specialization and the degrees held by our staff are as follows: Field of specialization

Degree Urban and Environmental Systems Planning

Ph.D Public Administration.

PhD Civil Engineering -

M.S (2) City and Regional Planning---

M.S. Business Administration/Systems Analysis.

M.B.A. Environmental Engineer-

B.S. Political Scientist

B.S. Urban Planner..

B.S. Library Science-----

B.S. 3. The fiscal year 1971 appropriation for Environmental and Urban Research for this office is $750,000. Approximately $305,000 of that amount is being used for Environmental Research projects. All fiscal year 1971 funds have been committed.

4. The environmental research program conducted by this office is aimed at; refining, testing and demonstrating specific techniques for assessing the environmental, aesthetic, and economic impacts of transportation improvements ; developing, testing, and demonstrating the application of environmental factors to intermodal transportation planning techniques; and, evaluation of ongoing departmental programs with respect to a national urban growth policy and the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, particularly those associated with relocation housing, joint development, interdisciplinary team planning, and environmental impact.

This office does not sponsor or conduct basic research. Our projects are actionoriented and designed for near term implementation.

Our environmental research is not focussed upon analyzing technology development. Rather, it is designed to develop practical techniques for use in the transportation planning process for assessing the social, economic and environmental impacts of all modes of transportation systems. In this respect, transportation technology is assessed in terms of its impact on these factors.

5. The nature of our research program is such that ecosystems per se are not thoroughly investigated. However, as we develop comprehensive tools for assessing environmental impacts, ecology is one of the main categories in which we are doing analysis.

6. A relatively minor but significant proportion of our research program is being conducted in-house. In order to develop a framework for overall research planning, investigation is being made into a systematic method of dealing with environmental factors which must be considered in all phases of transportation planning, construction, and operation.

The major proportion of the environmental research managed by the Office of Environmental and Urban Research is performed under contract. The present proportions of institutional contractors are as follows:

Private Consultants, 50 percent.
State Governments, 16 percent.

Local Governments, 34 percent. 7. Our principal mechanism in this regard is the capability of our own professioal staff within the office. As an interdisciplinary group, the staff, through the in-house research, identifies and addresses comprehensive environmental issues which require research. In addition, we have sponsored mechanisms for identifying and addressing large-scale transportation environmental questions by interdisciplinary (design concept) teams.

Coordination activities with the Environmental Protection Agency is achieved through continual discussions and exchange of information with EPA staff. There are no documents of agreement.

8. The existing research structure of the Office of Environmental and Urban Research permits, within the given resource constraints, wide latitude to investigate the comprehensive research of important environmental questions relating to transportation.

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ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PROGRAM OF OFFICE OF SUPERSONIC TRANSPORT

DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION The Office of Supersonic Transport Development (G. T. Haugan, SS-300, ext. 68410) has submitted information concerning its projects in the areas of sonic boom, radiation, noise pollution, and air pollution research for inclusion in the OST response to Senator Muskie's request of 14 May 1971, for information concerning DOT's environmental research. Attachment 1 is the summary provided by SS-300 of obligations by fiscal year for environment-related studies performed under the SST Program, Small additional amounts from the prime contracts of Boeing and GE would also be included, but the information could not be assembled within the necessary time frame.

The fiscal year 1971 studies can be further clarified:

(a) Total fiscal year 1971 obligations for environment-related studies performed under the SST program=$147,000.

(b) See table below.

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(c) Place research is performed and percentage of fiscal year 1971 expeditures :

Percent DOT facilities. Other Government facilities (including interagency transfers).

73 Outside Contracts :

Percent Universities Nonprofit IndustryProfit Industry--

Total

100

SUPERSONIC TRANSPORT PROGRAM-SONIC BOOM/RADIATION/ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

(In thousands of dollars)

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1 Study of public reaction to sonic booms, Oklahoma City area, February 3 to July 30, 1964.
2 Contractor - technical assessment.
3 Sonic boom structural study, White Sands Proving Ground, November 1964 to February 1965.
+ Study to determine public acceptability to sonic boom, Edwards AFB, June 1966 to January 1967.

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