Page images
PDF
EPUB

APPENDIX C-MARINE SCIENCES COUNCIL ACTIVITIES, CONTRACTS, AND REPORTS-Continued

APPENDIX C-1-CONGRESSIONAL TESTIMONY ON GOVERNMENTWIDE ISSUES .Continued

Date

Topic

Committee

July 9, 1969 Council program and budget for fiscal year 1969.... Senate-Appropriations, Subcommittee on the

Department of the Interior and related agencies. July 22, 1969, Centralization of Federal science activities..... House--Science and Astronautics, Subcommittee July 28, 1969

on Science, Research, and Development. July 31, 1969 Use of marine sources of food to improve nutritional Senate--Select Committee on Nutrition and Human conditions of American citizens.

Needs.
Sept. 16, 1969 National oceanographic program and report of House-Merchant Marine and Fisheries, Subcom-

Commission on Marine Science, Engineering, and mittee on Oceanography.
Resources.

Testimony by Executive Secretary, Marine Sciences Council. 2 Committee on Appropriations. 3 Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries. * Committee on Public Works.

APPENDIX C-2--CONTRACTS SPONSORED BY THE MARINE SCIENCES COUNCIL

Subject

Contractor

Amount

Report No.1

[blocks in formation]

International legal problems of ocean re- William T. Burke, Ohio State University....

search. Law for sea's minerals.

Louis Henkin, Columbia Law School. Potential of spacecraft oceanography. General Electric, Valley Forge, Pa.. Potential of aquaculture...

American Institute of Biological Science,

Washington, D.C.
Encouraging marine resource development ?.. National Planning Association, Washington,

D.C.
Systems analysis of specified trawler opera- Litton Industries, Beverly Hills, Calif.......

tions.

[blocks in formation]

Nonmilitary needs for underwater technology. Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio,

Tex. International law and fishery policy.

Paul W. Dodyk, Columbia Law School. Multiple use of Chesapeake Bay.

Trident Engineering Associates, Annapolis,

Md.
Economic potential of U.S. continental margin. Economic Associates, Inc., Washington,

D.C.
Management of marine data systems, phase I. Systems Development Corp., Santa Monica,

Calit.
Evaluation of marine resource statistics... Surveys & Research Corp., Washington,

D.C.
Outline of marine legal conflicts.

William L. Griffin, Washington, D.C.
International Indian Ocean expedition. Robert G. Snider, State College, Pa.
Legal aspects of coastal land-sea intertace.. Albert Garretson, New York University Law

School.
Legal aspects of Great Lakes resources.

do
Seminar on liability aspects of marine American Trial Lawyers Association, New
activities.

York, N.Y.
Multiple use of the Greater Seattle Harbor.... Management & Economics Research, Inc.,

Palo Alto, Calit.
Conterence on future of fishing industry. University of Washington, Seattle, Wash..
Multiple use of Lakes Erie and Superior.. National Planning Association, Washington,

D.C.
Multinational investments in marine sciences. Institute of Politics and Planning, Wash-

ington, D.C. Catalog of marine research 3.

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C... Science and engineering aspects of decade of National Academies of Sciences and Engiocean exploration,

neering, Washington, D.C.
Gulf of Mexico research and environmental Gulf Universities Research Corp., Houston,
program.

Tex.
Economic aspects of selected ocean related Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

5,000 41, 194 25, 000

PB 182437

[blocks in formation]

10,000 74, 300

activities. Collection and analysis of information in sup- Florida Institute of Oceanography.....

port of the gulf environment measurement

program. Federal Planning for U.S. participation in the National Academies of Sciences and Engi

international decade of ocean exploration, neering, Washington, D.C. Alternative international seabed regimes The Brookings institution, Washington,

governing development of nonliving re- D.C.

sources.
Intergovernmental Relations and the National Harold F. Wise & Associates, Washington,
Interest in the U.S. Coastal Zone,

D.C.
Management of marine data systems, phase System Development Corp., Santa Monica,
II.

Calit.

2,000

43,000

15,000

20,000

PB 184212

577, 805

AD 699125

SAD 699126

1 Reports available from the Clearinghouse for Federal Scientific and Technical Information, Springfield, Va. 22151. 2 Jointly sponsored with National Science Foundation. 3 For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. 4 Vol. 1. 3 Vol. 2.

APPENDIX C-MARINE SCIENCES COUNCIL ACTIVITIES, CONTRACTS AND

REPORTS--CONTINUED

APPENDIX C-3--REPORTS OF THE MARINE SCIENCES COUNCIL

Title

Date Marine Science Affairs-A Year of Transition: The First Re

port of the President to the Congress on Marine Resources and Engineering Development..

February 1967 Aquatic Sciences in the Great Lakes Area--

March 1967 Oceanographic Ship Operating Schedules, 1968_

July 1967 University Curricula in the Marine Sciences, Academic Year 1967-68

2August 1967 Addendum to University Curricula in the Marine Sciences, Academic Year 1967-68.

SAugust 1967 United States Activities in Spacecraft Oceanography---- October 1967 Marine Science Affairs-A Year of Plans and Progress : The

Second Report of the President to the Congress on Marine
Resources and Engineering Development.

February 1968 Marine Science Activities of Canada and the Nations of Europe

April 1968
Marine Science Activities of the Nations of East Asia - 'April 1968
Marine Science Activities of the Nations of Latin America -. April 1968
Marine Science Activities of the Nations of the Near East and
South Asia---

?April 1968 Marine Science Activities of the Nations of Africa

*April 1968 Oceanographic Ship Operating Schedules, 1968_

’April 1968 International Decade of Ocean Exploration--

‘May 1968 Oceanographic Ship Operating Schedules, September 1968-February 1969.-

August 1968 Marine Science Affairs-A Year of Broadened Participation :

The Third Report of the President to the Congress on Marine
Resources and Engineering Development...

January 1969 University Curricula in the Marine Sciences and Related Sci

ences and Related Fields--Academic Years 1969–70 and 1970–71

October 1969 Marine Research Fiscal Year 1968-A Catalog of Unclassified

Marine Research Activities Sponsored During Fiscal Year
1968 by Federal and Nonfederal Organizations.---

July 1969
Oceanographic Ship Operating Schedules, November 1969-
April 1970_.

October 1909 1 For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, WashIngton, D.C. 20402.

2 Available from Marine Science Affairs Staff of the Oceanographer of the Navy, Building 159-E, room 476, Navy Yard, Washington, D.C. 20390.

OFFICE OF EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

OFFICE OF EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS,

Washington, D.C., June 24, 1971, Hon. EDMUND S. MUSKIE, United States Senate, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SENATOR MUSKIE: This is in response to your letter of May 14, 1971.

In connection with our responsibilities in disaster assistance, we are conducting some studies in minimizing the effects of major disasters. Environmental factors are sometimes an element of consideration in our disaster efforts. It is our opinion, however, that these activities are not of a character to be of interest in your consideration of S. 1113.

OEP is presently conducting an in-depth analysis as directed by Public Law 91-606 to determine what improvements are needed in disaster preparedness and in operations to minimize loss of life and property. The effects of earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes, and other types of disasters are being reviewed.

Our disaster preparedness efforts include predisaster protection planning and preventative actions against the effects of those disasters that are predictable to some extent. For example, spring floods can sometimes be predicted as a result of unusually heavy winter snow accumulations, followed by early warm weather in the spring, causing fast melting. We do not, however, address the environmental factor, per se, either in our regular program or in the study cited above.

It does not appear that our activities fall within the category of “research programs in environmental science and technology" on which you request information. Sincerely,

G. A. LINCOLN, Director.

OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY,

Washington, D.C., June 10, 1971. Hon. EDMUND S. MUSKIE, Chairman, Subcommittee on Air and Water Pollution, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SENATOR MUSKIE: You recently wrote to us asking for information about our research programs in environmental science and technology.

As I am sure you know, as an officer in the Executive Office of the President, we are a staff operation and do not participate in or support directly any research programs. Thus the questions you ask do not seem to apply to our Office. Sincerely yours,

EDWARD E. DAVID, Jr., Director.

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION,

Washington, D.C., June 16, 1971. Hon. EDMUND S. MUSKIE, Chairman, Subcommittee on Air and Water Pollution, Committee on Public

Works, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. DEAR SENATOR MUSKIE: Your letter of May 14, 1971, requested the answers to a number of questions regarding details of active research programs in environmental science and technology, in connection with S. 1113, 92nd Congress.

The General Services Administration is not conducting specific environmental research programs to which your questions would be applicable.

Laboratories operated by our Federal Supply Service do not perform environmental research of the nature described in your letter. They do, however, engage in product testing to determine whether products meet procurement specifications and whether specification changes are warranted. Any environmental control requirements which are incorporated in procurement specifications are in implementation of standards prescribed by legislation or policies established by the Council on Environmental Quality or the Environmental Protection Agency.

GSA's Public Buildings Service has no facilities specifically directed toward environmental research. Its activities involve applied research on building products, components, and systems as a basis for criteria furnished to architectengineers for use in the design of buildings. Environmental considerations are resolved on an informal basis with other Federal agencies having special expertise, including the Environmental Protection Agency.

A dual-fuel program administered by the Transportation and Communications Service would come under the heading of technology assessment. In this program, a certain number of vehicles procured for motor pool use are converted to a system in which compressed natural gas, liquid natural gas, or liquid petroleum gas are used as a substitute for gasoline.

The vehicles are used in normal motor pool operation to determine their economic feasibility. We make use of technology presently available from private industry, through purchase of conversion kits. The testing of emissions is accomplished through informal arrangement with the Environmental Protection Agency. No GSA laboratories are involved in the program.

If further information is desired regarding any of the above-described activities, we shall be pleased to provide it. Sincerely,

HAROLD S. TRIMMER, Jr.,

Assistant Administrator. (1222)

DEPARMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE
THE SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE,

Washington, D.C., July 2, 1971.
Hon. EDMUND S. MUSKIE,
Chairman, Subcommittee on Air and Water Pollution, Committee on Public

Works, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. DEAR SENATOR MUSKIE: It is my pleasure to transmit the answers to questions raised in your letter of May 14. The replies to each question are identified on the enclosed report by the agency responding.

I hope the report supplies the necessary information for use by the Subcommittee and inclusion in the Hearing Record. With best regards, Sincerely,

ELLIOT RICHARDSON, Secretary. Enclosure.

Questions and Answers on details of existing active research programs in environmental science and technology that might be considered to be in conflict with or a complement to the mandate of the National Environmental Laboratories-requested by Senator Muskie in letter to Secretary, DHEW, May 14, 1971. Answers are by Food and Drug Administration (FDA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and Health Services and Mental Health Administration (HSMHA).

Question 1. What is the organizational structure of your environmental research program? How many separate laboratories or installations in your agency are engaged in this research? What is the size and composition of the staff of each?

Answer. FDA: With the exception of the National Center for Toxicological Research, the component units of the Food and Drug Administration do not conduct environmental research programs. The National Center for Toxicological Research consists of one installation. The size and composition of the staff are not as yet fixed.

NIH: The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is one of the ten Institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and is located in a single installation, the National Environmental Health Sciences Center, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. This Institute uses the usual NIH mechanisms-grants, contracts, and intramural research in carrying out its mission, the study of the effects of various environmental agents on man's health. The staff of the Institute is composed of the following full-time, part-time, and temporary personnel : Professional

76 Technical

135 Clerical and support--

34

Total.--

245 HSMHA: In HSMHA there are a variety of research efforts that concern themselves with the adverse effects of environment on the health of man. It is not possible to delineate a specific organizational structure for these efforts. They are located in conjunction with other health programs such as the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Bureau of Community Environmental Management (BCEM), and the Center for Disease Control (CDC). No laboratory is engaged completely in environmental research. The laboratory under construction at Morgantown, West Virginia, is the only laboratory most directly involved in environmental research. It is not yet occupied or staffed. Current funding will allow a staff of 75 to 100 to work on health problems associated with coal mining. The laboratories in Salt Lake City are concerned with the health problems of uranium miners, the laboratories in Cincinnati are concerned with health problems that arise from the work environ

(1223)

« PreviousContinue »