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TABLE 5.--Identified health research interfaces between Solid Waste Office and

other Federal agencies
Interfacing agency

Eramples of health research interface
Department of Interior:
Bureau of Mines---

Environmental hazards of mine wastes. Department of Defense.

Disposal of hazardous wastes, e.g., rocket

fuel. Department of Agriculture----- Health hazards of feedlot wastes and

pestcide containers. Atomic Energy Commission.-

Disposal of radioactive wastes. Department of Housing and Urban Health hazards associated with improper Development.

solid waste disposal. Department of Health, Education, Hazards of disposal of solid wastes conand Welfare:

taining asbestos.
Public Health Service:
Bureau of Occupational Safety

and Health.
National Institutes of Health:
NIEHS.

Health effects of trace metals, pesticides,

and synthetic organic substances introduced into the environment by solid

waste disposal practices.
WCI.

Selenium and carcinogenesis.
VIAID.

Relationship of solid waste disposal to in

fectious disease and allergic disorders. Health Services and Mental

Health Administration :
WIMH.--

Social effects of solid waste disposal prac

tices upon selected populations. Center for Disease Control.. Relationship of solid waste disposal prac

tices to communicable disease vectors. FDA--

Health effects of trace metals, pesticides,

and synthetic organic substances.

0

TABLE 6.-Identified health research interfaces between the proposed Office of

Noise Abatement and Control and other Federal agencies
Interfacing agency

Examples of health research interface Department of Defense..--- Completed and ongoing effects and abate

ment research. Department of Transportation.

Do. Department of Commerce--

Do.
Department of Housing and Urban

Do.
Development.
Department of Labor.-

Do.
Veterans' Administration.--

Opportunity for effects research. National Aeronautics and Space Completed and ongoing effects and abateAdministration.

ment research. National Academy of Sciences/Na. Effects review and assessments.

tional Research Council. Department of Health, Education,

and Welfare: Public Health Service: Bureau of Occupational Safety and Health -

Completed and ongoing effects and abate

ment research, Bureau of Community and En- Do.

vironmental Management.
VIEHS..
National Eye Institute.--

Do.
Health Services and Mental

Health Administration : NIVII.-

Social and psychologic effects of noise. Food and Drug Administration

Yoise dimension of product safety.

Do.

Appendix A
AGENDA FOR MEETING BETWEEN ORM-EPA AND BUREAU OF OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH

AND SAFETY (BOSH)
I. Mission Interfaces
A. Environmental monitoring
B. Effects of environmental pollutants

1. Toxicologic studies
2. Epidemiology studies

3. Ecology studies
C. Environmental criteria and standards
II. Information Exchange
III. Coordinated Program Planning
IV. Specific Examples of Areas of Mutual Interest

A. Occupational, para-occupational and general population exposures to asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, other trace elements, minerals and synthetic organic compounds

B. Development of occupational, emission source and environmental standards
C. Listing of toxic substances, including toxic concentration
D. Linking epidemiology studies of occupational and non-occupational groups
E. Noise
V. Structuring the interface

Appendix B

AGENDA FOR MEETING BETWEEN ORM-EPA AND NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES (NIEHS)
I. Mission Interfaces
A. Environmental monitoring
B. Effects of environmental pollutants

1. Toxicology studies
2. Epidemiology studies

3. Ecology studies
II. Information Exchange
III. Coordinated Program Planning
IV. Specific Examples of Areas of Mutual Interest
A. Identifying carcinogens, mutagens, teratogens in the environment
B. Mechanisms of action of environmental pollutants
C. Toxicology of pesticides, trace metals and synthetic organics
D. Interactions of environmental pollutants
E. Inhalation studies of environmental pollutants
V. Structuring the Interface

Appendix C
AGENDA FOR MEETING BETWEEN ORM-EPA AND NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE

(NCI)
I. Mission Interfaces
A. Environmental monitoring
B. Effects of environmental pollutants

1. Toxicology studies
2. Epidemiology studies

3. Ecology studies
II. Information Exchange
III. Coordinated Program Planning
IV. Specific Examples of Areas of Mutual Interest
A. dentifying environmental carcinogens and co-carcinogens
B. Air pollutants and carcinogenesis
C. Ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation and carcinogenesis
D. Routes of exposure to carcinogens
E. Interactions of carcinogens
F. Metabolic effects of carcinogens
V. Structuring the Interface

Appendix D
AGENDA FOR MEETING BETWEEN EPA-ORM AND NATIONAL HEART AND LUNG

INSTITUTE (NHLI) 1. Mission Interfaces A. Environmental monitoring

64-737—71-pt. 239

B. Effects of environmental pollutants

1. Toxicology studies
2. Epidemiology studies
3. Ecology studies

4. Sociology studies
II. Information Exchange
III. Coordinated Program Planning
IV. Specific Examples of Areas of Mutual Interest
A. Etiology and natural history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
B. Effect of carbon monoxide upon coronary artery disease

C. Relationship of trace elements to hypertension, atherosclerosis and myocarditis

D. Statistical problems in chronic disease epidemiology
E. Environmental pollution and congenital heart disease

F. Exacerbation of heart and lung disorders by environmental pollution episodes V. Structuring the Interface

Appendix E
AGENDA FOR MEETING BETWEEN ORM-EPA AND HEALTH SERVICES AND

MENTAL HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (HSMA)
I. Mission Interfaces
A. Environmental monitoring
B. Effects of environmental pollutants

1. Toxicology studies
2. Epidemiology studies
3. Ecology studies

4. Sociology studies
II. Information Exchange
III. Coordinated Program Planning
IV. Specific Examples of Areas of Mutual Interest

A. With NCHS (HANES)-toxic trace metal and synthetic organic compound tissue burdens of the general population

B. With NCHS-coding day of death so that updated daily mortality models for urban areas can be made available to assess environmental pollution episodes

C. With NCHS-production of a health resource volume Metropolitan Mortality for 1963-1971

D. With NCHS—compilation of a workable classification for outpatient illness to replace the inadequate ICDA

E. With NIMH-interactions of the social and physical aspects of the environment

F. With National Clearinghouse for Smoking and Health-indoor air quality and interaction of tobacco smoking with environmental pollution

Attachment 8

Question 8. What important questions, if any, are you unable to research adequately within your existing research structure? What are the main hindrances to proceeding with such research?

Answer. At the present time we cannot identify any important questions which the EPA is unable to research adequately under its existing research structure. In this regard we understand research structure to mean the necessary legislative authority and the ability to responsively organize and manage research programs.

The quality of the EPA scientific and technical staff as well as their wide range of academic and work disciplines, as detailed in answer to Question 2, demon. strate a unique multi-disciplinary research capability. This broad range of skills are being marshalled to recognize, understand and control the deleterious consequences of all environmental insults to which man and the other inhabitants of our global ecosystem are being or will be subjected.

The EPA is proceeding with the research it is authorized to accomplish through a program optimally designed from considerations for national needs and most effective use of resources. The budgetary and manpower programs proposed by the President for Fiscal Year 1972 are adequate to achieve EPA's FY 72 research objectives. Future year budget and manpower programs for EPA research will be formulated and recommended to reflect appropriate changes in scope and emphasis of national needs.

These changes are now in the process of definition and will include consideration of a unified program for development and use of EPA research laboratory facilities.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT

COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY,

Washington, D.C., July 7, 1971. Hon. EDMUND S. MUSKIE, Chairman, Subcommittee on Air and Water Pollution, U.S. Scnate, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SENATOR MUSKIE: This is in response to your letter of May 14 in which you have requested information on research programs in environmental science and technology that might have bearing on the mandate of the proposed National Environmental Laboratories. I am pleased to supply you with the following information organized in the form of answers to the eight questions presented in your letter for use by your Subcommittee for inclusion in the hearing record.

1. The Council on Environmental Quality is not an operational organization. Consequently, we do not have any laboratories. To date, research carried out by the Council has followed the following procedures : contract study with a consulting organization or with several consultants reporting directly to members of the Council's staff; studies and surveys conducted by appropriate members of the staff; studies carried out by interagency committees organized and chaired by Council staff; studies carried out wholly or in part on the request of the Council by the National Academy of Sciences or other scientific organizations.

2. This is not applicable since the Council does not have any laboratories.

3. The funding for contract studies in FY 1971 has been $190,000. The budget request for this purpose for FY 1972 is $565,000.

4. The research which the Council carries out or sponsors is concerned largely with determining the status and trends in environmental conditions, and the state of the art in major environmental programs such as recycling and land use policy. This is not basic research nor is it technology development in the usual sense. The objective is to obtain the information which the Council requires to carry out its mandates which include provision of advice and assistance to the President, informing the public through the annual reports, coordinating Federal environmental activities, and recommending environmental policy and legislation.

5. None of the current earch activities of the Council are directly on ecosystem structure and function.

6. The Council has no laboratory or other research facilities beyond a small library. In our limited experience to date, nearly all of the contract work has been assigned to independent firms. I would reemphasize, however, that the Council relies on the research efforts of other agencies or interagency committees for most of what could be termed its environmental research. It is only in areas where the Council has identified gaps in existing knowledge of direct relevance to the Council mandates that the Council either contracts a study or organizes an interagency or other type of study.

7. Each member of the professional staff of the Council has certain areas of environmental concern which represent his particular responsibility. The Council has a series of advisory groups, interagency committees, and maintains constant liaison with the scientific and academic community, along with other sectors of the society in a continuing effort to keep abreast of status and trends in the environment. Wherever potential problems are identified, specific advisory groups or interagency groups are brought together. The Council's decision to further study or take other action on environmental questions is reached after on the basis of information provided from these sources.

Under section 2(F) of Executive Order 11514, this Council has responsibility for coordinating Federal programs relating to environmental quality. The programs of the Environmental Protection Agency along with those of other Federal agencies come under this overall responsibility. In terms of specific relationships with EPA, this Council is in frequent, nearly daily, contact with appropriate staff and directors of EPA, Work plans are exchanged and discussed as developed, and there is a continuing communication at various levels, aimed at assuring close coordination.

8. Question 8 is not directly applicable to Council activities. As indicated in questions 1 through 6, CEQ relies upon research performed by operating agencies, outside consultants, and the scientific and academy community.

I hope that this information will be helpful to you. If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. Sincerely yours,

RUSSELL E. TRAIN, Chairman. (1217)

NATIONAL COUNCIL ON MARINE RESOURCES AND ENGINEERING

DEVELOPMENT
NATIONAL COUNCIL ON MARINE RESOURCES

AND ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT,

Washington, D.C., June 2, 1971. Hon. EDMUND S, MUSKIE, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.O.

DEAR SENATOR MUSKIE: This is in reply to your letter of May 14, 1971 requesting information on environmental research conducted by the National Council on Marine Resources and Engineering Development.

The Secretariat of the National Council on Marine Resources and Engineering Development has completed its work. The Council, while in existence, was a staff office of the Executive Office of the President. Its functions were to advise the President on the development of policies and programs for the wise use of the marine environment. Therefore, our work does not appear to conform to the laboratory type work outlined in your questions. Such work was conducted by the member agencies of the Council that I believe are reporting to you directly on their programs.

The Council did conduct a number of in-house and contract studies for background information on policies regarding the marine environment. These studies are listed on pages 228–230 of the Fourth Annual Report of the Council which is attached. The Fifth Annual Report is also attached for your information.

The functions of the Council in providing advice will now be provided by an Interagency Committee on Marine Science and Enginering of the Federal Council for Science and Technology. That Committee will be chaired by Dr. Robert White, the Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. That Committee can provide you with copies of any of the studies mentioned above, if you desire, and provide information about current activities.

If you have any further need of historical information, I will be pleased to provide whatever I can. My phone number is 632-4270, and I am located in room 320 of the National Science Foundation. Sincerely yours,

E. L. DILLON,

Former Acting Executive Secretary. Enclosures.

APPENDIX C-MARINE SCIENCES COUNCIL ACTIVITIES, CONTRACTS, AND REPORTS

APPENDIX C-1-CONGRESSIONAL TESTIMONY ON GOVERNMENTWIDE ISSUES 1

Date

Topic

Committee

Oct. 10, 1966 Council program and budget for fiscal year 1967 .... House - Subcommittee on Supplemental Appro

priations, Oct. 17, 1966 ....do.......

Senate--Subcommittee on Deficiencies and Sup

plementals. Mar. 13, 1967 Council program and budget for fiscal year 1968.... House-Subcommittee on Interior and Related

Agencies Mar. 17, 1967 ...do......

Senate--Subcommittee on Interior and Related

Agencies?
Aug. 17, 1967 Review of Council activities on 1st anniversary of House –Subcommittee on Oceanography.3

Council.
Oct. 11, 1967 H.R. 13273, to extend deadline for Commission re- Do.3

port and lifetime of the Council. Nov. 28, 1967 S. 1262, to authorize Corps of Engineers shoreline Senate--Subcommittee on Flood Control, Rivers study.

and Harbors. Feb. 19, 1968 H.R. 15224, improvements for Coast Guard, research House -Subcommittee on Coast Guard, C&GS, and ship.

Navigation. Mar. 7, 1958 Council program and budget for fiscal year 1969. Senate Subcommittee on Interior and Related

Agencies. Mar. 13, 1958 ...do...

House -Subcommittee on Interior and Related

Agencies. Apr. 9, 1968 H.R. 15490, to increase appropriation for FPC pilot House --Subcommittee on Fisheries and Wildlife plant.

Conservation,
May 27, 1968 H.R. 11584, et al., to establish system of marine House-Subcommittee on Oceanography.

sanctuaries.
June 24, 1968 H.R. 13781, to extend authorization of the sea grant Senate---Committee on Commerce.

program. June 26, 1968 S. 3030, et al., to enable BCF to proceed with FPC House --Subcommittee on Fisheries and Wildlife plant.

Conservation.3
July 29, 1968 H. Con. Res. 803, to express concurrence with House-Subcommittee on Oceanography.

objectives of decade of ocean exploration.
Mar. 7, 1969 H.R. 5829, to extend lifetime of Council to June 30, House–Subcommittee on Oceanography.

1970. Apr. 1, 1969 H.R. 6495, to control oil pollution from ships, and Do.

other purposes.

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