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LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL.

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NEW YORK CITY, April 1, 1922. The SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

SIR: In accordance with the requirements of the act of June 15, 1916, entitled "An act to incorporate the Boy Scouts of America, and for other purposes,” I have the honor to transmit herewith a copy of the Twelfth Annual Report of the Boy Scouts of America. This includes the following reports:

1. Chief scout executive.
2. Treasurer.
3. Finance committee.
4. Departments: (a) Field; (b) education; (c) camping.
5. National court of honor.
6. Committee on foreign relations.
7. Department of sea scouting.
8. Editorial board.

9. Departments: (a) Library; (6) publications; (c) special report
supply department; (d) Report of committee on supplies and
equipment.
10. Committee on badges, awards, and scout requirements.
Sincerely and cordially yours,

Boy SCOUTS OF AMERICA,
JAMES E. WEST,

Chief Scout Executive.

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TWELFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BOY

SCOUTS OF AMERICA.

OUR AIMS AND IDEALS.

The world interest in the Boy Scout movement challenges the intelligent understanding of every one, and yet many people still ask "What is scouting?" "What do Boy Scouts do?"

The Boy Scout idea is a movement rather than an organization. It aims to supplement existing organizations such as the home, church, and school by engaging the boys' leisure energies in outdoor games and activities of cultural and practical value.

The aim of the scout movement is to inculcate character, which, though essential to success in life, is not taught within the school, and being largely a matter of environment is too generally left tó chance, often with deplorable results. The scout movement endeavors to supply the required environment and ambitions through games and outdoors activities, which lead a boy to become a better man, a good citizen.

WHAT SCOUTING IS.

Scouting is the process of making real men out of real boys by a real program which works.

Scouting is outdoor life and so health, strength, happiness, and practical education. By combining wholesome, attractive, outdoor activities with the influence of the scout oath and law the movement develops character.

It develops the power of initiative and resourcefulness.
It helps boys.
It insures good citizenship:

The Boy Scout movement healthfully and sanely offsets the disadvantages which civilization has caused.

CONSERVATION OF BOYHOOD.

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Conservation of our natural resources is universally approved, but of what value would material resources be unless we conserve the moral, intellectual, and physical future of the coming generation ?

Prevention is recognized as better and less expensive than cure. The Boy Scout movement takes the boy at that time of life when he is beset with the new and bewildering experiences of adolescence and diverts his thoughts therefrom to wholesome and worth-while activities. In this manner our character-building movement has done much in numerous cities to diminish the problem of juvenile delinquency.

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The war brought with it a relaxation of moral fiber, which is disastrous to youth unless offset by powerful positive influences. Scouting is just such a powerful, positive, counteracting influence. Its program offers an answer to the boy problem which proves. .

"DOING IS LEARNING.

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We want to help boys on leaving school to escape the evils of “blind alley” occupations—that is, such work as gives the boy a mere wage for the moment, but leaves him stranded without any trade or handicraft to pursue when he is a man and so sends him as a recruit to the great army of unemployed, and, what is worse, the unemployable. “Doing is learning and when 'a scout in the formative stage of his life has this lesson thoroughly impressed upon his mind, he has learned to be resourceful. The simple, help-yourself experience which a scout receives in his impressionable years prepares him to meet emergencies covering the entire range of existence which may develop later in his life.

SCOUTCRAFT INSTRUCTION.

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Scoutcraft includes instruction in first aid, life saving, tracking, signaling, cycling, nature study, seamanship, campcraft, woodcraft, chivalry, and all of the handicrafts.

In scouting the boy does not stand still. The opportunity and incentive for progress are always at hand.

He first becomes a tenderfoot (see scout oath and requirements of different classes set forth in Handbook for Boys), then a second-class scout, and then a first-class scout. After this the whole sphere of the scout program is made available by the boy's own application in qualifying himself to pass the tests of the various merit badges.

A boy takes up a hobby with the same zest that he plays tennis or football, and that hobby may become his trade. In other words, a boy has transferred his efforts from idle play or harmful mischief to vital achievements. And when the boy has learned to think constructively through the agency of play his problems are greatly simplified and his life more worth the living.

SCOUT NUMBERS AND NEEDS.

Nearly 411,000 boys are now registered scouts. In addition to this, there are probably twice as many more boys who are more or less actively following out the scout program because they have at some time within the last nine years come within the influence of scout training. They pay their own expenses, but must be directed, taught, and helped.

Over 36,000 clean men-largely college bred-are scout masters and assistants. Another 83,000 men and over act as councilmen and troop committeemen. They receive no pay, but they must be carefully selected, and stimulated by helpful publications and field work.

No expensive equipment is required. * All that is needed is the out-of-doors, a group of boys, and a competent leader.

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