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Question. Has the Department initiated any new Fish/Wilson Demonstration projects in fiscal year 1991? What steps have been taken to make it easier to states, localities and voluntary agencies to develop and implement alternative refugee resettlement models through the Fish/Wilson demonstration process?

Answer. One project in San Diego which was approved in FY 1990, has been implemented in FY 1991. The Department has been talking with two other interested parties, the county of Los Angeles and the State of Washington.

The Department has made every effort to make the application process easier. It has responded to every contact from every group expressing interest in a Fish/Wilson demonstration project, and has consulted fully with each one to assure that the applicant has a workable concept and has assisted applicants in reaching the agreements needed locally and with state governments. These more consultative procedures are expected to be codified in a new public announcement in FY 1992.

Question. Would you please provide for the Subcommittee a breakdown of allocations under the state administered Cash and Medical Assistance program. How much was allocated for the various priority categories within the account.

Answer:

The table below provides this information.

MARCN 21, 1991

REFUGEE PROGRAM
FY- 1990 FINAL ALLOCATION

GA

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STATE

AFDC

RCA
ALABAMA

22,000
ARIZONA

0 150,000
ARKANSAS

0

38.000
CALIFORNIA-DEXO 13,676,209
CALIFORNIA-N

0
CALIFORNIA-W 1,346,031 31,710,285
COLORADO

0 597
CONNECTIAT

617,728
DELAWARE

6,651
DIST. OF COL.

25,439
FLORIDA

2,352,953
GEORGIA

457.522
KAWAIT

387.059
IDANO

99,171
ILLINOIS

2,736,913
I NO IANA

76,712
TOWA

329,873
KANSAS

455,327
KENTUCKY

155,000
LOUISIANA

139,445
MINE

343, 165
MRYLANO

$26.414
MSSACHUSETTS

6,166,
NICHIGAN
MINNE SOTA
MISSISSIPPI

27
MISSOURI

360
KONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSNIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
MORTN CAROLINA
MORTN DAKOTA
ONIO
OKLAHOMA

242,426
OREGON

687, 137
OREGOW-DEMO

5,900,000
PENNSYLVANIA

6.3, 150
RHODE ISLANO
SOUTH CAROLINA

000
SOUTH DAKOTA

000
TENNESSEE
TEXAS

$71, 124
UTAN
VERMONT

$53,415
VIRGINIA

776,046
WASHINGTON

0 3.770,597
WEST VIRGINIA

0 13,270 WISCONSIN

182,067 1.275.760 WTONING

0 35.000 TOTAL

15,206,307 86,566,780

00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000

SSI TITLE XIX RMA

0 63,000
0 1,600,000

51.000
0

0
10,569,761 13,291,626
1,663,706

0
745,477
397, 187

0
93,449
6.581.997
586.858
520,269

94,047
2,454,166

70,000
534, 549
165, 129
198,000
201,974
89, 152

230.042
2.718,854

528.744
1,696, 181

0
586,837

40, 608
170,000
147, 704

77.919
307,291

170,000
0 18,233,251
351.904

0
1,215,742

73,024
580.938

0
1,565, 496
337,669
107, 555
50.000

288,524
1,680, 761
423,760

0
862,861
2.950,946

26.000
823,500

25,000 0 1,663,706 10,569,761 62,005, 026

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MI NORS ST. ADM. CASE MAN. TOTAL 75,000 71,696

231,696 900,000 210,642

2.800,662
1,406 77.355

167,761
0 899,087

14,573,296
0 1,138,615

25,000,000
941,263 2,010,721

37.672,006
24,786 486,007

1,853,908
270,964 586. 138

1,872,017
0

66,651
537,650 115.

771,876
22,38 873,968
3.680 511.158
0 97,206

004,536
0 106,051

297,269
2,773,727 1,395,154

9,370,958
186

149,896
1,074,760 260,810

2,200,000
143,025 286,519

1.050,000
0 18,343

371,343
62,471 55,939

459,629
27.656 47.064

507.045
404,113 448,330

1,906,8
1,366.171 2,302.195

12,551, 703
1,239,658 578,906

3,721,215
2,139,560 1,432,929

7,517,079
605, 112
891

633,855
0 207, 415

1.153.175
92,426 20,544

221,939
0
$2.960

302,960
0 63,965

411, 496
190,831

517, 155
1,201,895 341,295

2,356, 158
0
105,

395, TT
7,323,488 3,105, 703 O 12,558, 195
371,927 10,957

1,031, 736
400,000 174,043

574,043
475,326 826,623

3,675.440
0 53,005

360,455
1,080,250 527.628

2,873,953
0 616,842

5.516,862
1,439,815 590,672

5,279, 133
0 288, 781

290,902
26,000 60,000

219,555
0 22,952

118.952
0 10,866

416,911
197,249 682, 800

3,416, 152
404,876 293,013

743, 598
45,702 38,683

537.800
2,430,421 36,799

3, 104, 127
1,348,676 1,169,739

9,239,958
0
0

37,270
182,015 394.682

2.858.00 0 10. 198

70, 198 0 29,824,319 23.751,246 0 229,567,385

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Question. What has been the largest area of growth within the Cash/Medical assistance program?

Answer. The special programs of refugee cash assistance (RCA) and refugee medical assistance (RMA) for needy refugees who do not meet the categorical eligibility requirements for AFDC, Medicaid, and SSI have experienced the largest growth in cash and medical assistance.

Question. Would you please outline briefly the present status of refugee dependency rates. What is the average dependency rate for eligible refugees? To what degree do dependency rates vary from State to State?

Answer. As of September 30, 1989, the dependency rate of refugees who had arrived in the United States during the previous 24 months was 48.5 percent. Rates have varied greatly from State to State throughout the refugee program. The table below provides State-by-State figures.

FSA is not able to provide comparable dependency rates for September 30, 1990, because the Federal refugee funding period for AFDC, Medicaid, and SSI was reduced from 24 months to four months in January 1990 and to zero months in September 1990. Consequently, the data collected on refugees receiving assistance under these programs are no longer comparable.

Cash Assistance Dependency Among Timo-Eligible Relugees

September 30, 1989, and September 30, 1988

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Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana

1,132
1.198

390
1.203

250
298
98
87

22.1%
24.9%
25.1%
7.2%

867
1,066

354 1.232

150 311

67 129

17.3% 29.2% 18.9% 10.5%

Cash Assistance Dependency Among Time-Eligible Relugees

September 30, 1989, and September 30, 1988

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Total

187,987

91,166

48.5%

146,768

76,411

52.1%

.

al Caseload data derived from the Quarterly Performance Reports, or

QPRs (Form ORR-6), are submitted by 49 States (Alaska does not
participate in the refugee program) and the District of Columbia for
all time-eligible refugees and entrants. Caseload data include
AFDC, RCA, GA, and SSI recipients as reported by the States as of
9/30/89. Please note that caseload data may include children born in
the United States to refugee families, while the base population does
not include these children. This factor inflates the calculated depend-
ency rate to an unknown degree, which may be significant in States
with large AFDC caseloads. In a State with a small caseload, it may
cause the dependency rate to exceed one hundred percent.

a

b/ California's cash assistance data include 35,528 recipients participat

ing in the State's Refugee Demonstration Project (RDP) as of 9/30/89.

c/ California's cash assistance data include 29,816 recipients participat

ing in the State's Refugee Demonstration Project (RDP) as of 9/30/88.

d/ Oregon's cash assistance data include 652 recipients participating in

the State's Refugee Early Employment Project (REEP) as of 9/30/89.

el Oregon's cash assistance data include 278 recipients participating in

the State's Refugee Early Employment Project (REEP) as of 9/30/88.

QUESTIONS SUBMITTTED BY SENATOR WARREN RUDMAN

The FY 92 request for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program is $585 million below the FY 1991 appropriation, including amounts provided in an Energy Emergency Contingency Fund. This is a reduction of more than 36 percent. In testimony before the Subcommittee, these massive reductions were justified on the basis that energy burdens on families have been reduced as a result of a decline in prices and consumption. However, your most recent report on the program states that fewer households are receiving LIHEAP assistance and that the percent of household income spent on energy remained about the same as in 1981.

Question. If fewer households are receiving benefits and eligible households continue to pay as large a percentage of income as a decade ago, how do you interpret this as a sign of less need?

Answer. According to HHS' annual LIHEAP report to Congress for FY 1989, the percent of household income spent on energy has not remained the same as in 1981. In fact, it has declined sharply. AS shown in table K-13 (page 21), the average home energy (space heating and cooling) burden of low income households declined from 8.0 percent of household income in 1981 to 5.4 percent of household income in 1989, indicating a reduced need for LIHEAP to offset home energy costs as a percent of household income.

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