A Tale of Two Cities

Front Cover
T. B. Peterson and Brothers, 306 Chestnut Street, 1859 - 211 pages
Presents Dickens' classic novel of love, courage, and sacrifice set against the cataclysmic events of the French Revolution. During the French Revolution a sissolute English lawyer goes to th eguillotine to save a French aristocrat, husband of the woman he loves.

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Dreadful
What on earth are Google playing at put dreadful quality stuff like this out. A child could scan pages better than that. All the Dickens ones ate the same

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Poor quality text
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Contents

I
5
II
6
III
9
IV
10
V
15
VI
20
VII
26
VIII
29
XXXVI
83
XXXVII
86
XXXVIII
88
XXXIX
90
XLI
95
XLIII
97
XLIV
100
XLVI
106

IX
31
XI
37
XIII
39
XV
42
XVII
47
XVIII
51
XX
52
XXI
57
XXII
61
XXIV
62
XXVI
65
XXVIII
67
XXX
71
XXXII
76
XXXIV
81
XLVIII
111
XLIX
114
L
115
LI
118
LIII
120
LV
123
LVII
125
LVIII
131
LIX
136
LXI
142
LXII
143
LXIV
147
LXV
152
LXVI
157

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Page 5 - ... it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way...
Page 158 - Sow the same seed of rapacious license and oppression over again, and it will surely yield the same fruit according to its kind. Six tumbrils roll along the streets. Change these back again to what they were, thou powerful enchanter, Time, and they shall be seen to be the carriages of absolute monarchs, the equipages of feudal nobles, the toilets of flaring Jezebels, the churches that are not my Father's house but dens of thieves, the huts of millions of starving peasants! No, the great magician...
Page 9 - A WONDERFUL fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other. A solemn consideration, when I enter a great city by night, that every one of those darkly clustered houses encloses its own secret; that every room in every one of them encloses its own secret; that every beating heart in the hundreds of thousands of breasts there, is, in some of its imaginings, a secret to the heart nearest it!
Page 37 - ... this condition from the depths of his soul, it was also in its nature to arise of itself, and to draw a gloom over him, as incomprehensible to those unacquainted with his story as if they had seen the shadow of the actual Bastille thrown upon him by a summer sun, when the substance was three hundred miles away.
Page 5 - Heaven, we were all going direct the other way — in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.
Page 26 - After bursting open a door of idiotic obstinacy with a weak rattle in its throat, you fell into Tellson's down two steps, and came to your senses in a miserable little shop, with two little counters, where the oldest of men made your cheque shake as if the wind rustled it, while they examined the signature by the dingiest of windows, which were always under a shower-bath of mud from Fleet Street, and which were made the dingier by their own iron bars proper, and the heavy shadow of Temple Bar.
Page 5 - It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair...

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