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January 13, 1956

JATT 23 1956

Washington 25, D. C.

Vol. 5, No. 1

Provisional Information on Selected Notifiable bifeases in the United States and on

Deaths in Selected Cities for Week Ended January 7, 1956

Rabies in animals
NOTICE.- Beginning this week, several

For the period January 1, 1955, to January 3, 1956, a total
changes have been made in the list of notifi-

of 406 cases of rabies in animals was reported in California.
able diseases shown in this report. The new

While the majority of cases were in dogs, approximately a third
list was recommended by the Second Con-

(138) were in skunks. Among other wild animals, rabies were
ference of State Epidemiologists and approved

in foxes (20 cases), bobcats (3), bats (2), and a raccoon (1). The
by the Association of State and Territorial

remaining cases were in domestic animals as follows: cows (9),
Health Officers. Diseases dropped from the

cats (2), and a goat (1).
list for weekly reporting on the national level
are: Rocky Mountain spotted fever, scarlet

Epidemic meningitis
fever and streptococcal sore throat, trich-

Dr. A. A. Jenkins, Utah Department of Health, has reported
iniasis, tularemia, and whooping cough. There

2 cases of epidemic meningitis among 7 young children in one
is one addition, namely, other types of men-

family. The patients were comatose on admission to the hospi-
ingitis.

tal, but are making satisfactory progress toward recovery. All
members of the family have been treated prophylactically with
sulphadiazine. There are no known previous cases or subsequent

cases. All contacts have been notified and are under close sur-
Only 41 cases of diphtheria were reported this week as veillance by State and local health departments.
compared with a high of 104 for the week ended December 10,
1955. Almost half (17) of the cases were reported in the West Leptospirosis
South Central States. These and 2 Southern States, Alabama, Dr. R. H. Heeren, Iowa State Department of Health, has
(8 cases) and Florida (4), accounted for all but 12 of the total given preliminary information on a case of leptospirosis. The
cases.

patient became ill early in November about 12 days after being

bitten by the family dog. The dog was sick and icteric. The
EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS

patient's illness was characterized by malaise, fever, chills,

and severe headache. Complement fixation titers on blood spec-
Plague in a rodent

imens from the patient were as follows: Leptospira icterohem-
Mr. Frank M. Prince, Chief of the San Francisco Field orrhagiae, 1:128; L. canicola, 1:512; and L. pomona, 1:128. No
Station, PHS, has reported that tissues collected from a female illness has occurred among other members of the patient's fam-
rat, Rattus alexandrinus, found dead in Hawaii, were positive for ily, which includes her husband and 3 children.
plague. The specimen was obtained within the endemic area of
the Hamakua District, Kukuihaele area, Hawaii.

Psittacosis

Dr. Mason Romaine, Virginia Department of Health, has
Typhus fever

reported 3 cases of psittacosis, 2 of which occurred in one city.
Dr. A. C. Hollister, Jr., California Department of Public Blood specimens were collected from the 3 patients but no lab-
Health, has supplied final information on the case of typhus fever oratory reports have as yet been received. Two were store
reported for the week ended October 15. At that time the case clerks who came in contact with laboratory confirmed infected
was suspected to be of the louse-borne type. However, labora- parakeets. The source of one bird was New York City, and that
tory tests done later at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, of the other was North Carolina. The third patient owned 2 ca-
Washington, D. C., indicate the infection was probably of murine naries (not sick) and 2 parakeets. One of the parakeets appar-
type rather than epidemic.

ently became sick and was let out of the house. This bird was

caught and eaten by the family cat which later died of "pneu-
Leprosy

monia." The patient's wife and son have not been ill but blood
Dr. W. R. Giedt, Washington State Department of Health, specimens collected showed complement fixation titers of 1:64
has reported a case of leprosy in a 23-year-old man. The pa- for psittacosis.
tient was born in a foreign country and had lived in the United The California Department of Public Health has given epi-
States only 4 years, part of which was in New York. He has had demiologic information on 4 cases of psittacosis. Two cases
no known exposure to leprosy. In 1952 he noted a persistent were confirmed by fourfold rises in complement fixation titers
numbness of the right. arm. During the latter part of December for psittacosis. Of these 2 patients, 1 had no known exposure to
1955, he developed fever, malaise, and nodules which were scat- psittacine birds, and the other had shot 4 doves on a hunting
tered over the extensor surface of the body. A physical exam- trip. The other 2 patients were associated with psittacine birds.
ination revealed anesthesia of the right ulnar area. The patient No laboratory tests were made on these birds nor on the doves.
had nasal obstruction, a chronic ulcer over left elbow, and
inguinal adenopathy. The "nodules" were covered by patches Upper respiratory diseases
of reddened skin, many or most of them appeared to be raised Dr. A. M. Washburn, Arkansas State Board of Health, states
macules" varying between 1 and 2 cm. in diameter. The diag- that scattered reports and other information indicate that re-
nosis was supported by laboratory examination of smears from spiratory infections have been occurring in the State since Oc-
cutaneous lesions, lymph nodes, and nasal discharges.

tober. The chief characteristic, apparently, is a rather persist-
2

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

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ent sinusitis with bronchitis and coughing, with a duration of Coccidioidomycosis
from 2 to 5 days. Fever is considered uncommon. Antibiotics Dr. S. H. Osborn, Connecticut Department of Health, has
have been used quite extensively, but without effect, so far as reported a case of coccidioidomycosis in a 29-year-old veteran
terminating the condition or relieving the symptoms.

who saw service in California, Burma, China, and India. He was

admitted to one of the State tuberculosis sanatoriums in May of Poliomyelitis-like illness

1955, complaining of recent hemoptysis. A lesion in the left During August of this year, a number of poliomyelitis-like upper lobe was found on X-ray. Studies for tuberculosis were illnesses were reported by health officers in Marshall County, negative. Coccidioides immitis was found in his sputum and in Iowa. Recovery in most instances was complete in 7 to 10 days, sections of lung tissue when his left upper lobe was removed in and no paralysis developed. The illnesses were characterized September. He was discharged from the sanatorium in October by a sudden onset of severe headache, fever, nausea, vomiting, 1955 and is apparently doing well. stiff back and neck, retrobulbar pain, and dizziness. A number of the patients also complained of sore throat. An investigation Pasteurellosis on a random sampling basis revealed an estimate of 500 cases. The laboratory of the Connecticut State Department of Health Stool specimens collected from patients were negative for polio- has recently isolated Pasteurella multocida from a sputum culmyelitis virus isolation. However, the stool suspensions caused ture. Investigation revealed that the patient is a 67-year-old degeneration of monkey kidney tissues, and further, upon in- . dairy farmer. The patient has been hospitalized on numerous oculation into infant mice, these suspensions caused illness and occasions since 1943 with bronchiectasis. His right middle lobe paralysis. These findings are compatible with Coxsackie virus was removed in 1943, and the lingula of the left upper lobe was infection, probably the group B. Microscopic examination of the removed in 1949 because of bronchiectasis. Numerous sputum monkey tissues showed the degeneration in muscle bundles. cultures have been done throughout the years. Only the most Lesions were observed in the brain as well. Over 50 percent of recent, collected in a hospital on November 28, 1955, was rethe stools examined so far show these findings.

Continued on page 8

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Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES
(Numbers after diseases are category numbers of the Sixth Revision of the International Lists, 1948)

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Table 2. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES, EACH DIVISION AND STATE, ALASKA,

HAWAII, AND PUERTO RICO, FOR WEEKS ENDED JANUARY 8, 1955 AND JANUARY 7, 1956 (By place of occurrence. Numbers under diseases are category numbers of the Sixth Revision of the International Lists, 1948)

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