Page images
PDF
EPUB

<1

<1

|

1, MA

ny, NY

108

24

22

291

121

33

[ocr errors]

92

E BLE III. Deaths in 122 U.S. cities,* week ending April 12, 2008 (15th Week).
All causes, by age (years)

All causes, by age (years)
All

P&It
All

P&It eporting Area Ages >65 45-64 25-44 1-24

Total
Reporting Area Ages >65

45-64 | 25-44 1-24

Total * England 518 389 90 20 10 9

S. Atlantic

1,310 829
318 106 30

26 104 on, MA 137 92 28 8 5 4 16

Atlanta, GA

185 111 50 15 4 5 10 geport, CT

32 29

1
1
1 3 Baltimore, MD

212 109 61

32 6

17 bridge, MA 18 13 5

3
Charlotte, NC
131 86 27 12 2

14 River, MA 29 24 5

3 Jacksonville, FL

178 103 53 12 7 3 ford, CT

39 29

8

2

4
Miami, FL
96 70 18

6

2 24 all, MA

24 19
4

2
Norfolk, VA
51 36 12

1

2 2.
14 12
2

Richmond, VA
82 50 24

6

1 1 3 Bedford, MA

22 17
4
3 Savannah, GA

77 64 10

2.

1 10 Haven, CT

12 10

1

1
2 St. Petersburg, FL
73 47 16 2

4 6 idence, RI 58 43 10

Tampa, FL
203 138 42 17

15 erville, MA

5
3
2

Washington, D.C.

U
U
U
U

U ngfield, MA

35 22

7
3
3 2
Wilmington, DE
22 15 5

1
erbury, CT
30 26 3

1

5 cester, MA 63 50 10 3

E.S. Central 8

911 591 222 54 25 19 82 Birmingham, AL 100 64 28

5 2 1 10 Atlantic 2,229 1,581 456 122 26 43 138 Chattanooga, TN

98 75 13 3 6 1 7 58 36 16

2 1
3 5 Knoxville, TN

70 22 12 2 2 10 town, PA

22
1
1
3 Lexington, KY

126
70 42 9 2

11 alo, NY 87 60

4
1
13 Memphis, TN
172 110 45 9 5

20 den, NJ 48 29 12

5
2 1
Mobile, AL
102 72 20

4

4 10 ibeth, NJ

16 9

6
1

3
Montgomery, AL

70 48 13 5 2 2 2 PA 59 44 12

2

5
Nashville, TN
135 82 39

7 4 3 12 ey City, NJ

22 15

5
1

1 1 York City, NY 1,099 799 215 63

W.S. Central 13 54

1,570 1,028 365 111 32 34 82 ark, NJ 40 13 13

Austin, TX 6

7 1

86 2

51 21 10 2 2 3 rson, NJ

21 10

4
2

Baton Rouge, LA
1
4

33 20
1

6

4
adelphia, PA
184 T7 17

Corpus Christi, TX
6
18

61 47 11

3

5 burgh, PA 25

Dallas, TX
2
5

205
50 20

10 ding, PA 52 43 4

El Paso, TX 1

110 78 23

3 4 6

2 4 hester, NY 148 114 4 3

Fort Worth, TX 14

147 2

100 34

8 1

4 5 enectady, NY 27 20 1

Houston, TX
374 235 85 38 7

15 nton, PA 32 25

Little Rock, AR
1
2

54 26
5 3

1 cuse, NY 104 86 12 2.

New Orleans, LA 3

U U

U U U U ton, NJ

32 18
9

San Antonio, TX
4

243 1 1

165 63 10 3 2 12 11 10

Shreveport, LA
67 49 13

2. 1 2 17 ers, NY

25 19
5

Tulsa, OK

152
1

108 33
8 3

10 Central 2,135 1,464 476

Mountain 106 38 49 177

1,153 759 263 69 31 30 101
48 31
14

Albuquerque, NM
1
1

99
1

62 20

7 4 6 6 on, OH

40 31
5

Boise, ID
3

61 1

43
6

16
2

3 167 64 26 7 6

Colorado Springs, CO 25

54 37 11

2 3

1 6 innati, OH

55 17

2

Denver, CO 1

92 9

62 21

6
eland, OH
249 208 31

4
4

Las Vegas, NV
2 16

277 178 76 15 5 3 28 mbus, OH 261 178 58

Ogden, UT 17 3 5 24

38 27

9
1

1 1 on, OH 132 97 27

Phoenix, AZ
8
13

191 107 52 19 7 5 18 oit, MI 171 94 43 12

Pueblo, CO

39
4 18 5

23 11
2 3

4 isville, IN 52 44 8

Salt Lake City, UT

128 4

19 6 5 6 12 Wayne, IN 67 45 14 2

Tucson, AZ
4
1 8

128 28
9 4

17 1, IN

25 15

5
3 2

Pacific

1,332 930 281 72 26 23 117 id Rapids, MI 52 35 12

1
1 8
Berkeley, CA

15 10

4
1

3 inapolis, IN 114 58 10 3 7 18

Fresno, CA
166 127 22 11 5

6 sing, MI 46 34 10

1
1

5
Glendale, CA

U U

U U

U aukee, WI 124 75 42

4
1
2 10
Honolulu, HI
58 42 10

3 2

7 ria, IL 49 30 15

3 1

7
Long Beach, CA
66 40 23

1

1 1 9 Kord, IL 50 37 12

1

1
Los Angeles, CA
U U U U U

U h Bend, IN

49 8
2. 1

4
Pasadena, CA

23 16

4 do, OH

111
74 27

8
Portland, OR

146 109 23 igstown, OH

57 51
6

6
Sacramento, CA

U U U
Central
655 416 166 36 15

San Diego, CA
21 64
188 119 47

4 21 Moines, IA

San Francisco, CA

125 80 28 10 2. 5 th, MN

29 21

6
2

San Jose, CA
3

189

42

3 4 4 27 jas City, KS

25 17

5
3

Santa Cruz, CA
2
41 29 10

1

3 :sas City, MO 110 68 32 4

115
Seattle, WA
2
4 9

76 27

9
1

2. 8 oln, NE 59 44 4

61
Spokane, WA
1
4

46 10 2 2

8 leapolis, MN 66 25 4 2 10 11

Tacoma, WA

139 100 31
ha, NE
85 63 17

4
1 11
Total

11,813** 7,987 2,637 696 233 254 920 ouis, MO 127 72

11 5 2 8 aul, MN 54 40 11

2

1 4 vita, KS

100
66

2. 5 1 12 navailable. -:No reported cases. ortality data in this table are voluntarily reported from 122 cities in the United States, most of which have populations of 100,000. A death is reported by the place of its currence and by the week that the death certificate was filed. Fetal deaths are not included. jeumonia and influenza. cause of changes in reporting methods in this Pennsylvania city, these numbers are partial counts for the current week. Complete counts will be available in 4 to 6 weeks. cause of Hurricane Katrina, weekly reporting of deaths has been temporarily disrupted. tal includes unknown ages.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

1, NY

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

П, ОН

ago, IL

[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]

92

174

[ocr errors]

192

63

136

[ocr errors]
[graphic][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed]
[graphic]

VPub

20 2009 7/16

[ocr errors]

Veekly

Workers' Memorial Day

April 28, 2008 Workers' Memorial Day, observed each year on pril 28, was established to recognize workers who died I were injured on the job. In 2006, 5,840 workers in ne United States died from injuries sustained at work 1); an estimated 49,000 annual deaths have been ttributed to work-related diseases (2). In 2006, an stimated 4.1 million private-sector workers had a nonital work-related injury or illness; approximately half f these workers required a job transfer, work restricons, or time away from their jobs (3). An estimated 4 million workers were treated in emergency departnents in 2004 because of occupational injuries, and pproximately 80,000 were hospitalized (4). In 2005, orkers' compensation costs for employers totaled an stimated $89 billion (5). Additional information on workplace safety and ealth is available from CDC at http://www.cdc.gov/ iosh. Information also is available by telephone, 00-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636).

eferences US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. National Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries in 2006. Washington, DC: US Department of Labor; 2007. Available at http://www.bls.gov/ news.release/pdf/cfoi.pdf. Steenland K, Burnett C, Lalich N, Ward E, Hurrell J. Dying for work: the magnitude of U.S. mortality from selected causes of death associated with occupation. Am J Ind Med 2003;43:461–82. US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Workplace injuries and illnesses in 2006. Washington, DC: US Department of Labor; 2007. Available at http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/ osh.pdf. CDC. Nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses United States, 2004. MMWR 2007;56:393–7. Sengupta I, Reno V, Burton JF Jr. Workers' compensation: benefits, coverage, and costs, 2005. Washington, DC: National Academy of Social Insurance; 2007. Available at http://www.nasi.org/ usr_doc/nasi_workers_comp_2005_full_report.pdf.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

The MMWR series of publications is published by the Coordinating
Center for Health Information and Service, Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention (CDC), U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services, Atlanta, GA 30333.
Suggested Citation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
[Article title]. MMWR 2008;57:[inclusive page numbers).
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Julie L. Gerberding, MD, MPH

Director
Tanja Popovic, MD, PhD

Chief Science Officer
James W. Stephens, PhD
Associate Director for Science

Steven L. Solomon, MD
Director, Coordinating Center for Health Information and Service

Jay M. Bernhardt, PhD, MPH
Director, National Center for Health Marketing

Katherine L. Daniel, PhD
Deputy Director, National Center for Health Marketing
Editorial and Production Staff

Frederic E. Shaw, MD, JD
Editor, MMWR Series

Teresa F. Rutledge
(Acting) Managing Editor, MMWR Series

Douglas W. Weatherwax
Lead Technical Writer-Editor
Donald G. Meadows, MA

Jude C. Rutledge

Writers-Editors

Peter M. Jenkins
(Acting) Lead Visual Information Specialist

Lynda G. Cupell

Malbea A. LaPete
Visual Information Specialists
Quang M. Doan, MBA

Erica R. Shaver
Information Technology Specialists

Washington. To reduce fatalities among the Pacific Coas commercial fishermen at greatest risk, additional preve tion measures tailored to the Northwest Dungeness o fishery should be considered.

A case was defined as a fatal occupational traumati jury in the commercial fishing industry during 2000-2 reported from California, Oregon, or Washington. Dez. mination of an occupational fatality used established get lines for injury at work, which take into account where injuries occurred (i.e., on or off employer premises' 21. whether the person was being compensated for the active at the time of the event (3). Data were collected from mi tiple sources in each state, including reports from the l': Coast Guard, local law enforcement agencies, and lou. media; death certificates; and state-based occupation: fatality surveillance programs.

Fatality rates were calculated using estimates of the nos ber of FTE commercial fishermen for each year durre 2000–2006; these estimates considered the number of te sels participating in a fishery, number of days at sea, ali average number of crew members on board each ved Estimates of the number of FTE fishermen in some smiscale fisheries could not be determined; therefore, tels events from those fisheries were included in the descripis: statistics but not in the rate calculations.

During 2000-2006, a total of 58 commercial fishing fatalities were reported from Oregon (21 (36%]), Calunia (20 [34%]), and Washington (17 [29%]) (Figure). THE number of fatalities, by year, during 2000–2006 was 2 follows: 2000 (eight), 2001 (seven), 2002 (10), 2010 (eight), 2004 (10), 2005 (five), and 2006 (10). All decedents were male; mean age was 39 years. Forty-th: (74%) of the fatalities resulted from the loss (i.e., capsizin or sinking) of 23 fishing vessels, 11 (19%) resulted from persons falling overboard, and four (7%) resulted from oth: incidents involving deck injuries or diving injuries.

Among the 43 fatalities that resulted from vessel los weather conditions were a contributing factor in 34 dead (79%); other contributing factors included large was (17 [40%]), flooding (16 (37%]), and vessel instabilt (11 [26%]) (Table 1). Among the 11 deaths that resulte from falling overboard, none of the persons wore a persona flotation device. Contributing factors in these deathi included being alone (six deaths [55%]), slipping or trip ping (six [55%]), gear entanglement (three [27%]), wer et slippery deck (three [27%]), and alcohol or drug use by a decedent (three [27%]) (Table 1).

Editorial Board William L. Roper, MD, MPH, Chapel Hill, NC, Chairman

Virginia A. Caine, MD, Indianapolis, IN

David W. Fleming, MD, Seattle, WA
William E. Halperin, MD, DIPH, MPH, Newark, NJ
Margaret A. Hamburg, MD, Washington, DC
King K. Holmes, MD, PhD, Seattle, WA
Deborah Holtzman, PhD, Atlanta, GA

John K. Iglehart, Bethesda, MD
Dennis G. Maki, MD, Madison, WI
Sue Mallonee, MPH, Oklahoma City, OK

Stanley A. Plotkin, MD, Doylestown, PA
Patricia Quinlisk, MD, MPH, Des Moines, IA
Patrick L. Remington, MD, MPH, Madison, WI

Barbara K. Rimer, DrPH, Chapel Hill, NC
John V. Rullan, MD, MPH, San Juan, PR

Anne Schuchat, MD, Atlanta, GA
Dixie E. Snider, MD, MPH, Atlanta, GA

John W. Ward, MD, Atlanta, GA

of commercial fishing fatalities,* by location

California, Oregon, and Washington,

Washington

Oregon

TABLE 1. Number and percentage of fatalities* from commercial fishing vessel loss or falls overboard, by contributing factors - California, Oregon, and Washington, 2000–2006 Contributing factort

No.

(%) Vessel loss Weather conditions

34

(79) Struck by large wave

17

(40) Flooding

16

(37) Instability

11

(26) Grounding

8

(19) Crossing hazardous sandbar

7

(16) Illicit drugs used by any crew member

6

(14) Open door or hatch

3

(7) Fatigue experienced by any crew member 2

(5) Alcohol used by any crew member

1

(2) Falls overboard Alone (not witnessed)

6

(55) Trip or slip

6

(55) Gear entanglement

3

(27) Wet or slippery deck

3

(27) Alcohol or drugs used by the decedent

3

(27) Lost balance

(18) Ropes on deck

(18) Fatigue experienced by the decedent

2

(18) Vessel motion

1

(9) Vessel loss (n = 43 (23 vessels]); falls overboard (n = 11). Fatalities might have had more than one contributing factor.

California

I loss 3 [23 vessels]) verboard 1) (n = four)

TABLE 2. Number and percentage of fatalities from commercial
fishing vessel loss,* by life raft complications - California,
Oregon, and Washington, 2000-2006
Life raft complications

No.

(%) No raft aboard vessels

12

(28) Raft malfunctioned

12

(28) Unable to reach raft

9

(21) Unable to free raft

3

(7) Trapped in vessel

3

(7) Unknown

4

(9) N = 43. t None of the fishermen who died were able to enter a functional life raft. $ Includes seven deaths of fishermen aboard four skiffs that were too small to carry a life raft.

13 persons whose deaths resulted from vese to enter a functional life raft. In 12 (28%)

no life raft was aboard the vessel; however, deaths were among fishermen aboard skiffs nall to carry a life raft. Other life raft comSed malfunctioning (12 [28%]) and inabilft (9 (21%) (Table 2). of the 23 vessels that were lost had a cur

U.S. Coast Guard voluntary dockside safety ree vessels had expired decals (i.e., >2 years nation), and 12 vessels did not have a decal e never participated in the safety examinaour vessels were skiffs and were not included ion program; decal status was unknown for ong fatalities in these 23 vessel losses, three espite successfully donning an immersion

suit*; 31 persons did not use an immersion suit, and immersion suit use was unknown for the other nine persons. Information regarding how many of the vessels had immersion suits aboard was not available.

The highest number of fatalities (23 [40%]) was reported from the shellfish fishery (including 17 from the Northwest Dungeness crab fleet), followed by salmon and other pelagic fisheries (15 [26%]) and the groundfish fishery (10 [17%]). Type of fishery was not identified for 10 fatalities.

One person who drowned wore the immersion suit improperly; another person wore the suit properly but died from head trauma after striking his head on rocks; the third person wore the suit properly but drowned, with no indication of head trauma.

« PreviousContinue »