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Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED DISEASES: SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED

NOVEMBER 7, 1953

(Numbers after diseases are category numbers of the Sixth Revision of the International Lists, 1948)

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EAST NORTH CENTRAL Akron-Canton-Chicago-Cincinnati Cleveland ColumbusDaytonDetroitEvansvilleFlint-Fort Wayne Grand RapideIndianapolisMilwaukee Peoria-South Bend Toledo--Youngstown

WEST NORTH CENTRAL Des Moines Duluth -Kansas City, Kans. Kansas City, Mo. MinneapolisOmaha--St. Louis-----St. Paul Wichita-

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Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED DISEASES: SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED

NOVEMBER 7, 1953-Continued

(Numbers after diseases are category numbers of the Sixth Revision of the International Lists, 1948)

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The chart shows the number of deaths reported for 106 major cities of the United States by week for the current year, and, for comparison, the median of the number of deaths reported for the corresponding weeks of the three previous calendar years. (The median is the central one of the three values arranged in order of magnitude.) If a report is not received from a city in time to be included in the total for the current week, an estimate is made to maintain comparability for graphic presentation.

The figures reported represent the number of death certificates received in the vital statistics offices during the week indicated, for deaths occurring in that city. Figures compiled in this way, by week of receipt, usually approximate closely the number of deaths occurring during the week. However, differences are to be expected because of variations in the interval

between death and receipt of the certificate.

While week-to-week changes in the total number of deaths reported for all major cities generally represent a change in mortality conditions, this may not be true for variations in weekly figures for each city. For example, in a city where 5C deaths are the weekly average, the number of deaths occurring in a week may be expected to vary by chance alone from 36 to 64 (d + 2rd, where d represents the average number of deaths per week).

The number of deaths in cities of the same size may also differ because of variations in the age, race, and sex composition of their populations, and because some cities are hospital centers serving the surrounding areas. Changes from year to year in the number of deaths may be due in part to population increases or decreases.

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230 1,107

206 1,187

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November 20, 1953

Washington 25, D. C.

Vol. 2, No. 45

Provisional Information on Selected Notifiable Diseases in the United States for

Week Ended November 14, 1953

the bird became sick and the patient took care of it. Two weeks after procuring the bird, the man developed chills and fever and pulmonary infiltration. The first complement fixation test was negative and the second was positive in a dilution of 1:16. Large doses of an antibiotic were administered. Psittacosis virus was recovered from the bird.

A total of 1,669 cases of measles was reported in the United States for the current week as compared with 1,856 for the corresponding week of 1952. More than half of the total cases were reported in the Middle Atlantic (284), East North Central (312), and Pacific Divisions (342).

While the total number of measles cases for the calendar year to date is about two-thirds of the total reported for the same period of 1952, the incidence of the disease since the seasonal low point (about September 1) is 15 percent higher than that for the corresponding period of last year. Since the first of September, a total of 11,925 cases has been reported as compared with 10,360 for the corresponding period of 1952. During the past 2 months, increases in reported cases over a comparable period of 1952 have occurred in 7 of the 9 geographic divisions. The percentage increases in this period over those for last year ranged from 6.3 in the East South Central Division to 72.7 in the West South Central. The South Atlantic Division also reported a large increase (62.4). The 2 divisions showing decreases in incidence over last year's "disease year" were the East North Central and the West North Central with 18.2 and 60.0 percent, respectively.

The incidence of measles in Alaska, unlike that of the United States, was unusually high during the summer months and reached a peak rather than a low the last week in August. Since that time there has been a general decrease in the incidence for the Territory. For the current week, 27 cases were reported or a 36 percent decrease from last week's figure. Although this number is substantially greater than that for the corresponding week of last year, when no cases were reported, it represents a decrease of almost 90 percent from the peak figure of 240.

For the current week a total of 590 cases of poliomyelitis was reported, which brings the cumulative total for the year to 33,531. For the corresponding period of 1952, the total was 53,765. For the "disease year,” which began about April 1, thọ cumulative total is 32,017 as compared with 52,572 for last year.

Influenza

The following report has been received by the Influenza Information Center, NIH, and the National Office of Vital Statistics.

The Division of Preventive Medicine, SGO, Air Force, and Dr. A. L. Gray, Mississippi State Board of Health, have reported that 5 cases with symptoms of primary atypical pneumonia occurred in the early part of November at an Air Force Base in Mississippi. Preliminary laboratory studies in the CDC Virus Laboratory, Montgomery, Alabama, show evidence of influenza B infection. There has been no general increase in the respiratory disease rate at this base.

Gastro-enteritis

Dr. U. P. Kokko, Kentucky Department of Health, reports 2 small outbreaks o gastro-enteritis involving 3 women and 2 men. The victims became ill with cramps, vomiting, and diarrhea about 4 hours after eating beef and ham sandwiches. The 2 parties had eaten sandwiches that had been obtained from a vending machine on different days. This machine, which had no facilities for refrigeration, was filled each day at 1:00 p.m. with beef, cheese, and ham sandwiches made in the diet kitchen. They were sold during the following 24 hours. The stale sandwiches supposedly were removed before fresh ones were supplied. Since the machine was empty when inspected no food was available for bacteriological examination,

Dr. S. B. Osgood, Oregon State Board of Health, reports that 2 persons became i 4 hours after eating ham sandwiches at a local eating place. No other Ullnesses have been reported from this source. Laboratory examination of the ham revealed the presence of hemolytic staphylococcus.

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS.

Psittacosis

Dr. Mason Romaine, Virginia Department of Health, has supplied information on 2 cases of psittacosis from different parts of the State. In one instance an employee of a pet shop developed symptoms suggestive of psittacosis. Complement fixation was positive in a titer of 1:1000. This case and the birds involved are still being investigated. The other case was in a man who had purchased a parakeet from a pet shop. One week later

Communicable diseases in other areas

There have been 8 confirmed cases of jungle yellow fever in a camp near Cerro in the State of Bolivar, Venezuela. A fatal case in the Department of Santander, Colombia, has also been reported. A fatal case confirmed by laboratory examination has also occurred in the northeastern part of Nicaragua near the border of Honduras.

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