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Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and other Non-profit Organizations [2 CFR 215, Subpart C, Section 215.53, (OMB Circular A-110)] grantees shall maintain separate records for each grant to ensure that funds are used for authorized purposes. Grant-related records are subject to inspection during the life of the grant and must be retained at least 3 years. Records must be retained beyond the 3-year period if litigation is pending or audit findings have not been resolved.

7 CFR Part 3430, Competitive and Noncompetitive Non-formula Grant Programs General Grant Administrative Provisions and Program-Specific Administrative Provisions; 7 CFR Part 3015, USDA Uniform Federal Assistance Regulations; 7 CFR Part 3017, Government wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement) ; 7 CFR Part 3018, New Restrictions on Lobbying; 7 CFR Part 3019, Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-profit Organizations; and 7 CFR Part 3021 USDA implementation of Governmentwide Requirements for Drug-free Workplace (Financial Assistance).

Account Identification:

12-1500-0-1-352.

Regional or Local Office:

None.

Headquarters Office:

Obligations: (Project Grants) FY 11 $8,816,480; FY 12 est $8,824,690; and FY 13 est $8,833,740 - The difference between the appropriation and obligation numbers reflects legislative authorized set-asides deducted as appropriate, and in son cases the availability of obligational authority from prior years. Range and Average of Financial Assistance: If minimum or maximum amounts of funding per competitive project grant or cooperative agreement are established, these will be announced in the annual program announcement or Request for Application (RFA).

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Youth, Family, and Community, Division of Community and Education, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2250, Washington , District of Columbia 20250-2250 Phone: (202) 720-2324 Fax: (202) 720-2030

Website Address:

PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS:

http://www.nifa.usda.gov/

RELATED PROGRAMS:

Fiscal Year 2011: The Hispanic-Serving Institutions Education Grants Program promotes and strengthens the ability of Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs) to carry out education programs that attract outstanding students and produce graduates capable of enhancing the nation's food and agricultural scientific and professional work force. Projects may involve individual institutions, consortia of HSIs, or cooperative initiatives between two or more HSIs or with other colleges and universities, units of government, or the private sector.

10.210 Food and Agricultural Sciences National Needs Graduate Fellowship Grants; 10.217 Higher Education Challenge Grants; 10.220 Higher Education Multicultural Scholars Program; 10.226 Secondary and Two-Year Postsecondary Agriculture Education Challenge Grants

EXAMPLES OF FUNDED PROJECTS:

20 projects were awarded in 2011, representing 7 states and Puerto Rico

HSI led four webinars to HSI grantees to inform about opportunities for Hispanic and underrepresented students on internships and potential jobs within USDA. One webinar was conducted for HSIs to provide information about 2012 RFA and grant application process

Fiscal Year 2011: (1) One project is preparing students for career paths with the USDA Forest Service by linking student success with experiential learning opportunities. This proposal is a collaboration among 11 institutions. Our objectives center on mentoring cohorts of students to prepare them for careers in Natural Resource Management. Students will be provided experiential learning opportunities appropriate for their academic level that engage them in resource management. Projects highlights include FS and other internships, faculty mentorships, local and international field courses, a semester exchange program, high school field trips, and advising and tutoring. The project will result in improved recruitment, retention, academic performance and graduation rates, and more Hispanic American students moving directly to careers with USDA. Fifty (50) students (26 females and 24 males) are currently enrolled in our NM_PR Career Tracks Program as follows: 43 BS, six MS and one Ph.D.

The HSI Peer Review Panel was comprised of 28 individuals (2 Black males, 3 Asian Pacific Islander males, 8 Hispanic males, 3 Hispanic females, and 2 white females). Fiscal Year 2012: In Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, a total of $ 9.2 million was available to support projects in the following areas of emphasis: (1) Faculty Preparation and Enhancement for Teaching; (2) Curricula Design, Materials Development, and Library Resources; (3) Instruction Delivery Systems; (4) Scientific Instrumentation for Teaching; (5) Student Experiential Learning; and (6) Student Recruitment and Retention (including financial assistance).

In April 2012, a twenty-one member peer review panel reviewed 83 proposals.

A total of 19 representing five (5) states and Puerto Rico (7 Continuation and 11 Regular) projects are in the process to be awarded the amount of $8,804,505.

(2) Another project has established a Consortium for Agriculture Education and Hispanic Workforce Development (FCCAGE). More than 70 students (both grant-funded and unfunded), 60 percent of which are Hispanic Americans took advantage of the agroecology courses, internships, workshops, and travel opportunities offered by the FCCAGE. At least 100 more, including some high school students and teachers, attended the annual agroecology symposium. These scholarly activities, along with teaching resources such as the Campus Organic Garden, student Garden Club, and effective collaborations with area government and non-governmental agricultural institutions, including area organic farmers, have expanded the universitys faculty expertise in offering training and advice to college and high students and teachers on issues related to local and national agriculture and environmental management. The project has created partnership with seven USDA agencies providing 33 internships. The total number of students served through this initiative where 50% female, 83% Hispanic, 12% Black, and 5% White.

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create a collaborative network of researchers, educators, USDA agencies, and non-profit organizations to coordinate efforts, share resources, and increase educational, training and post-graduation opportunities for Hispanic students pursuing careers in the Sustainable Energy area.

Within guidelines established for the program as described in the Request for Application (RFA).

Across the consortium, 92 students applied for USDA internships (75% Hispanic and 42.4% female students); 53 of those students are currently being supported under the project. A total of 18 students will be interns in the summer of 2012; 14 of those at USDA agencies and 4 of them at other agencies. Fifteen (15) student presentations have already been given at regional or national conferences. The consortium is also supporting through this award a total of 53 students (nine PhD, eight MS, and 36 undergraduates).

One HSI National Program Leader participated in various events and made four trips to participate in conference to promote and offer information on the HSI Grants program.

Another HSI National Program Leader engaged in activities to promote diversity in the HSI program and create professional networks. Fiscal Year 2012: (1) One project The Pima Innovative Nutrition Track (PINT) will address the problem of career opportunities for underrepresented populations by resolving a gap in available Nutrition classes for Hispanic students. The project will target 145 Hispanic students through a Nutrition Science curriculum, encouraging enrollment in a new transfer certificate in Nutrition. The program will include guest speakers, field trips, and other opportunities to open up career options to targeted students. The project will develop a new nutrition-based curriculum and negotiate an articulation agreement to create a transfer pipeline for students to achieve baccalaureate degrees in nutritional science.

10.225 COMMUNITY FOOD PROJECTS Community Food Project Program FEDERAL AGENCY: National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Department of Agriculture AUTHORIZATION: The Community Food Projects Competitive Grants Program (CFPCGP) legislative authority is located in Section 25 of the Food Stamp Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 2034), as amended by the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 and Section 4402 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act (FCEA) of 2008 (Pub. L.

, 110-246), which authorizes a program of federal grants to establish and carry out Community Food Projects., 7 U.S.C 2034. OBJECTIVES: To support the development of community food projects designed to meet the food needs of low-income people; increase the self-reliance of communities in providing for their own needs; and promote comprehensive responses to local food, farm, and nutrition issues. TYPES OF ASSISTANCE: Project Grants USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Community food projects are intended to take a comprehensive approach to developing long-term solutions that help to ensure food security in communities by linking the food sector to community development, economic opportunity, and environmental enhancement. Comprehensive solutions may include elements such as: (1) Improved access to high quality, affordable food among low-income households; (2) support for local food systems, from urban gardening to local farms that provide high quality fresh food, ideally with minimal adverse environmental impact; and (3) expanded economic opportunities for community residents through local business or other economic development, improved employment opportunities, job training, youth apprenticeship, school-to-work transition, and the like.

(2) Another project currently enrolls more than 60 Natural Resources Management (NRM) majors; 75% are underrepresented minority (UM) students. We project 50% enrollment increases over the next 3 years. We plan

3 focused advising, early academic intervention, and a Geographic Information System (GIS)-enhanced curriculum to increase the number of UM students graduating with NRM B.S. degrees and GIS skills. Graduates will have the competencies to collect, manage, manipulate, and share geospatial agricultural data as well as to contribute to the sustainment of rural agriculture and management of natural resources impacted by climatic changes.

Any solution proposed must tie into community food needs.

(3) Another project is an interdisciplinary and collaborative effort between 5 Hispanic serving institutions, which will provide students from agriculture and related disciplines with graduate research assistantships, undergraduate research stipends and educational and training experiences. The scope also involves outreach activities and hands-on research experiences for talented K-12 students. All of education training activities are aimed at providing innovative, high impact research training and education experiences to students and faculty from underrepresented Hispanics groups. The project will establish and consolidate a pipeline attracting, recruiting, retaining and graduating talented individuals while supporting their actual placement in Agriculture-related positions.

Successful applicants must provide matching funds, either in cash or in-kind amounting to at least 50 percent of the total cost of the project during the term of the grant award. 1. Construction and Renovation: With prior approval, and in accordance with applicable Federal cost principles, grant funds may be used to plan, acquire, or construct a building or facility, or to acquire land; and for improvements, alterations, renovations, or repairs to land or buildings, necessary to carry out a funded project under this program. However, requests to use grant funds for such purposes must demonstrate that such expenditures are essential to achieving the major purpose for which the grant request is made.

2. Indirect Costs: Full Negotiated Rate.

(4) Another project brings added value to Latinos pursuing graduate education and employment in USDA occupations. It will identify, select, and cultivate Masters degree level students in food and agricultural sciences disciplines through an outstanding thesis award competition focused on USDA priority areas of Food Safety, Climate Change, Sustainable Energy and Childhood Obesity. Fifty fellows, including the award winners, will participate in a Career Preparation Institute networking with senior faculty researchers and USDA agency representatives and create a leadership plan focused on developing human capital relevant to meeting the USDA labor force needs. Fiscal Year 2013: 9.2 million for HSI program

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Special Note on Indirect Costs as in-kind matching contributions: Indirect costs may be claimed under the Federal portion of the award budget or, alternatively, indirect costs may be claimed as a matching contribution (if no indirect costs are requested under the Federal portion of the award budget). However, unless explicitly authorized in the RFA, indirect costs may not be claimed on both the Federal portion of the award budget and as a matching contribution, unless the total claimed on both the Federal portion of the award budget and as a matching contribution does not exceed the maximum allowed indirect costs or the institutions negotiated indirect cost rate, whichever is less. An awardee may split the allocation between the Federal and non-Federal portions of the budget only if the total amount of indirect costs charged to the project does not exceed the maximum allowed indirect costs or the institutions negotiated indirect cost rate, whichever is less. For example, if an awardees' indirect costs are capped at 30 percent pursuant to FY 2012 appropriated funds,

HSI 2013 RFA will be published by October 2012

Seven Collaboration-Continuation projects will be funded

Three information webinars for HSIs are scheduled for 2013 in addition to four webinars about student internship opportunities through the USDA portal. CRITERIA FOR SELECTING PROPOSALS:

effective usefulness to producers and the general public of each application.

Evaluation Criteria will be delineated in the RFA.

Deadlines:

Contact the headquarters or regional office, as appropriate, for application deadlines.

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time:

Section 720 of the Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2012 (Division A of Pub. L. 112-55), the awardee may request 15 percent of the indirect costs on both the Federal portion of the award and as a matching contribution. Or, the awardee may request any similar percentage that, when combined, does not exceed the maximum indirect cost rate of 30 percent. Applicant Eligibility: Proposals may be submitted by private nonprofit entities. Because projects must promote comprehensive responses to local food, farm, and nutrition issues, applicants are encouraged to seek and create partnership among public, private nonprofit and private for-profit organizations or firms. To be further eligible for a grant, a private nonprofit applicant must meet three mandatory requirements: 1. Have experience in the area of: (a) community food work, particularly concerning small and medium-sized farms, including the provision of food to people in low-income communities and the development of new markets in low-income communities for agricultural producers; or (b) job training and business development activities in low-income communities; 2. demonstrate competency to implement a project, provide fiscal accountability and oversight, collect data, and prepare reports and other appropriate documentation; and 3. demonstrate a willingness to share information with researchers, practitioners, and other interested parties. Beneficiary Eligibility: Low income people.

Section :094 - Deadlines: Dates for specific deadlines are announced in the RFA each fiscal year. Information is also available via our website and may be obtained via the Grants.gov website. Respective links are provided below: http://www.nifa.usda.gov/ http://www.grants.gov

Section :095 - Range of Approval/Disapproval Time: From 30 to 180 days.

Appeals:
Not Applicable.

Renewals:

Specific details are provided in the Request for Applications (RFA) each fiscal

year.

Credentials/Documentation:

No Credentials or documentation are required. This program is excluded from coverage under OMB Circular No. A-87. Preapplication Coordination:

Formula and Matching Requirements: This program has no statutory formula. Matching Requirements: Percent: 100.%. Successful CFP applicants and PP award applicants MUST provide matching on a dollar-for-dollar basis (100%) for all federal funds awarded.

Matching funds are not required for T & TA grants.

All RFAs are published on the Agencys website and Grants.gov. Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process. Please see the following Grants.gov link for more information: http://www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp. An environmental impact statement is required for this program. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372.

The legislation establishing the FSLC requires that as a condition to receiving a grant from NIFA, the NGO must contribute in-kind resources toward implementing the grant. To comply with this provision, NIFA has determined that applicants must provide at least 25 percent of total project resources on an in-kind basis during the term of the grant award. The Federal share of FSLC costs can be no more than 75 percent of total project costs.

Application Procedures: This program is excluded from coverage under OMB Circular No. A-102. This program is excluded from coverage under OMB Circular No. A-110. Applications should be submitted as outlined in the RFA. Applications must follow the instructions provided per Grants.Gov and in the Agency guide to submitting applications via Grants.gov.

OMB Circular No. A-122 applies to this program.

CFP, PP and FSCL grantees may provide matching funds through cash and/or in-kind contributions, including third-party in-kind contributions fairly evaluated, including facilities. The non-federal share of the funding may come from state government, local government, other non-profit entities, or private sources. Examples of qualifying matching contributions may include direct costs such as: rent for office space used exclusively for the funded project; duplication or postage costs; and staff time from an entity other than the applicant for job training or nutrition education.

Award Procedure:

**SPECIAL NOTES:

Applications are subjected to a system of peer and merit review in accordance with section 103 of the Agricultural Research, Extension and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 1613) by a panel of qualified scientists and other appropriate persons who are specialists in the field covered by the proposal. Within the limit of funds available for such purpose, the NIFA Authorized Departmental Officer (ADO) shall make grants to those responsible, eligible applicants whose applications are judged most meritorious under the procedures set forth in the RFA.

Reviewers will be selected based upon training and experience in relevant scientific, extension, or education fields, taking into account the following factors: (a) The level of relevant formal scientific, technical education, or extension experience of the individual, as well as the extent to which an individual is engaged in relevant research, education, or extension activities; (b) the need to include as reviewers experts from various areas of specialization within relevant scientific, education, or extension fields; (c) the need to include as reviewers other experts (e.g., producers, range or forest managers/operators, and consumers) who can assess relevance of the applications to targeted audiences and to program needs; (d) the need to include as reviewers experts from a variety of organizational types (e.g., colleges, universities, industry, state and Federal agencies, private profit and non-profit organizations) and geographic locations; (e) the need to maintain a balanced composition of reviewers with regard to minority and female representation and an equitable age distribution; and (f) the need to include reviewers who can judge the

(1) Use of Indirect Costs as In-Kind Matching Contributions. Indirect costs may be claimed under the Federal portion of the award budget or, alternatively, indirect costs may be claimed as a matching contribution (if no indirect costs are requested under the Federal portion of the award budget). However, unless explicitly authorized in the RFA, indirect costs may not be claimed on both the Federal portion of the award budget and as a matching contribution, unless the total claimed on both the Federal portion of the award budget and as a matching contribution does not exceed the maximum allowed indirect costs or the institutions negotiated indirect cost rate, whichever is less. An awardee may split the allocation between the Federal and non-Federal portions of the budget only if the total amount of indirect costs charged to the project does not exceed the maximum allowed indirect costs or the institutions negotiated indirect cost rate, whichever is less. For example, if an awardees' indirect costs are capped at 22 percent pursuant to section 1462(a) of NARETPA (7 U.S.C. 3310(a)), the awardee may request 11 percent of the indirect costs on both the Federal portion of the award and as a matching contribution. Or, the awardee may request any similar percentage that, when combined, does not exceed the maximum indirect cost rate of 22 percent.

(2) MATCHING FUNDS ARE NOT REQUIRED FOR TRAINING AND

PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS:

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE (T & TA) GRANTS. MOE requirements are not applicable to this program. Length and Time Phasing of Assistance: The term of competitive project grants and/or cooperative agreements under this program may not exceed three (3) years. Method of awarding/releasing assistance: by letter of credit. Reports: Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFAs electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions. Cash reports are not applicable. Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFAs electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions. A final Financial Status Report (SF-269) or Federal Financial Report (SF-425) is due within 90 days of the expiration date of the grant and should be submitted to the address listed below, in accordance with instructions contained in 2 CFR 3430.55 (also refer to Section 3015.82 of the Uniform Federal Assistance Regulations).

Fiscal Year 2011: In a nation simultaneously challenged by both hunger and obesity, the importance of healthy food for all is evident. In FY2011, the active CFPs are estimated to have generated and handled 1.5 million pounds of food including fruits and vegetables, meats, dairy items, eggs and honey. The number of people and organizations involved in and affected by these Community Food Projects during FY 2011 was significant. Nearly 181,000 Americans were provided food as a result of the programs and about 54,000 were K-12 students or youth attending summer programs. Customers and food recipients varied in age, race and ethnicity and most resided in low-income areas. Nearly 9 in 10 CFP participants reported that they were healthier, provided healthier food for their families, and had increased their consumption of fruits and vegetables as a result of participating in the project. Significant increases in participant knowledge and attitudes related to healthful eating and local food systems were also found. Source: Community Food Projects: Indicators of Success Fiscal Year 2011, provided by the Community Food Security Coalition. Fiscal Year 2012: 176 Community Food Projects were reviewed.

Funded projects included: 2 Training and Capacity Building projects 6 Planning Projects and 14 Community Food Projects. Fiscal Year 2013: Pertinent details to be provided by Program at a future date. REGULATIONS, GUIDELINES, AND LITERATURE:

Awards Management Division (AMD) Office of Grants and Financial Management (OGFM) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) STOP 2271 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20250-2271. Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFAs electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions.

7 CFR Part 3430, Competitive and Noncompetitive Non-formula Grant Programs General Grant Administrative Provisions and Program-Specific Administrative Provisions; 7 CFR Part 3015, USDA Uniform Federal Assistance Regulations; 7 CFR Part 3017, Government wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement); 7 CFR Part 3018, New Restrictions on Lobbying; 7 CFR Part 3019, Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-profit Organizations; and 7 CFR Part 3021 USDA implementation of Governmentwide Requirements for Drug-free Workplace (Financial Assistance).

Audits:

Regional or Local Office:

None.

Headquarters Office:

In accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular No. A-133 (Revised, June 27, 2003), "Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations," nonfederal entities that expend financial assistance of $500,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Nonfederal entities that expend less than $500,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in Circular No. A-133. Audits will be conducted in accordance with guidelines established in the revised OMB Circular No. A-133 and implemented in 7 CFR 3052. This program is also subject to audit by the cognizant Federal audit agency and the USDA Office of Inspector General.

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Food Safety and
Nutrition, Division of Nutrition, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2225,
Washington, District of Columbia 20250-2225 Phone: (202) 401-2138 Fax:
(202) 401-6488.

Website Address:

http://www.nifa.usda.gov/

Records:

RELATED PROGRAMS:

10.572 WIC Farmers' Market Nutrition Program (FMNP)

EXAMPLES OF FUNDED PROJECTS:

In accordance with the Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and other Non-profit Organizations [2 CFR 215, Subpart C, Section 215.53, (OMB Circular A-110)] grantees shall maintain separate records for each grant to ensure that funds are used for authorized purposes. Grant-related records are subject to inspection during the life of the grant and must be retained at least 3 years. Records must be retained beyond the 3-year period if litigation is pending or audit findings have not been resolved.

Fiscal Year 2011: See the Food Security Learning Centers CFP Database hosted by WhyHunger at http://www.whyhunger.org/cfp. Fiscal Year 2012: Projects scheduled to be funded: Harvesting Wellbeing is a Community Food Project with four public and private partners-a health center, and economic development corporation, a local farm and a regional fresh food network. The partners will implement the initiative on the U.S. Mexico border in a rural, low-income community that is 95% Hispanic/Latino. The vision is to renew food traditions in the community so locally-grown food is enjoyed by all for better health.

Account Identification:

12-3505-0-1-605.

Obligations: (Project Grants) FY 11 $4,800,000; FY 12 est $4,800,000; and FY 13 est $4,800,000 - The difference between the appropriation and obligation numbers reflects legislative authorized set-asides deducted as appropriate, and in some cases the availability of obligational authority from prior years. Range and Average of Financial Assistance: If minimum or maximum amounts of funding per competitive project grant or cooperative agreement are established, these will be announced in the annual program announcement or Request for Application (RFA).

In another project in the Hudson Valley, the project will improve access to affordable healthy food in what is a challenging food system in downtown Yonkers. The project includes major enhancements to its existing CSA, Farmers Market, and Community Garden Network, as well as entrepreneurial initiatives called the Youth Farm Team and a new 10,000 square ft. rooftop farm that will be operated as a social enterprise. The partnership involves a host of local farmers, a private developer, the City of Yonkers, local clergy, and community garden members. The cross-cutting nature of the program connects multiple sectors of the food system, involves social enterprise and job training, builds stronger relationships between the profit and non-profit food sectors, and develops our long-term capacity to improve community outcomes around healthy food access and health.

Community FoodWorks was initiated by Earth Learning to comprehensively address community food security in low-income communities, local food infrastructure, farm production capacity, farmer development, and nutrition issues. Earth Learning, and its partners propose several key components for a community food project: 1) The Farm at Verde Gardens, a 22-acre organic urban polyculture farm/farm market, with a commercial kitchen being operated in tandem with a housing community of 145 formerly-homeless households;

2) A beginning farmer apprenticeship program centered around the farm enterprise; and

3) A Local Food Hub, in its pilot phase, which extends out into the food shed.
Fiscal Year 2013: Pertinent details to be provided by Program at a future date.
CRITERIA FOR SELECTING PROPOSALS:
Within guidelines established for the program as described in the Request for
Application (RFA).

in order to help ensure the existence in the United States of a qualified workforce to serve the food and agricultural sciences system; and (b) promote complementary and synergistic linkages among secondary, 2-year postsecondary, and higher education programs in the food and agricultural sciences in order to attain excellence in education and to encourage more young Americans to pursue and complete a baccalaureate or higher degree in the food and agricultural sciences., 7 U.S.C 3121. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the Secondary Education, Two-Year Postsecondary Education, and Agriculture in the K-12 Classroom Challenge (SPECA) Grants Program is to: enhance curricula in agricultural education; increase faculty teaching competencies; interest young people in pursuing higher education in order to prepare for scientific and professional careers in the food and agricultural sciences; promote the incorporation of agriscience and agribusiness subject matter into other instructional programs, particularly classes in science, business, and consumer education; facilitate joint initiatives by the grant recipient with other secondary schools, institutions of higher education that award an associate's degree, institutions of higher education that award a bachelor's degree, and nonprofit organizations supporting agriscience and agribusiness education, to maximize the development and use of resources, such as faculty, facilities, and equipment, to improve agriscience and agribusiness education; support other initiatives designed to meet local, State, regional, or national needs related to promoting excellence in agriscience and agribusiness education; and support current Agriculture in the Classroom programs for grades K-12. TYPES OF ASSISTANCE: Project Grants USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Funds may be used only in targeted areas, e.g., curricula design and materials development, promotion of teaching competencies, promotion of agriscience and agribusiness career information, instruction delivery systems, student experiential learning, and educational activities that increase the diversity of students pursuing degrees in agriscience and agribusiness. NIFA has determined that grant funds awarded under this authority may not be used for the renovation or refurbishment of research, education, or extension space; the purchase or installation of fixed equipment in such space; or the planning, repair, rehabilitation, acquisition, or construction of buildings or facilities.

1. The applicability and merit of the proposed project in regard to its ability to: Meet the food needs of low-income people in the proposed community for providing for its own food needs; and promote comprehensive responses to local food, farm, and nutrition needs;

2. the capacity to become self-sustaining once Federal funding ends; and

3. organizational and staff qualifications and experience; and 4. additional criteria will be considered relative to the extent the proposed project contributes to: (a) developing linkages between two or more sectors of the food system; (b) supporting the development of entrepreneurial projects; (c) developing innovative linkages between the for-profit and nonprofit food sectors; (d) encouraging long-term planning activities and multi-system, interagency approaches; and (e) incorporating linkages to one or more ongoing USDA themes or initiatives referred to in the program guidelines and/or annual proposal solicitation.

Tuition remission not allowed.

Section 720 of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2012 (Pub.L. No. 112-55) limits indirect costs to 30 percent of the total Federal funds provided under each award. Therefore, when preparing budgets, applicants should limit their requests for recovery of indirect costs to the lesser of their institutions official negotiated indirect cost rate or the equivalent of 30 percent of total Federal funds awarded.

10.226 SECONDARY AND TWO-YEAR POSTSECONDARY AGRICULTURE EDUCATION CHALLENGE GRANTS SPECA Grants Program FEDERAL AGENCY: National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Department of Agriculture AUTHORIZATION: Section 1405 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977, as amended, (7 U.S.C. 3121) designates the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) as the lead Federal agency for agriculture research, extension and teaching in the food and agricultural sciences. Section 7109 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-246) amends the authority for this program contained in section 1417(j) of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977, as amended (7 U.S.C. 3152(j))., 7 U.S.C 3152 (j); Section 1405 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977, as amended, (7 U.S.C. 3121) designates the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) as the lead Federal agency for agriculture research, extension and teaching in the food and agricultural sciences. Section 7109 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-246) amends the authority for this program contained in section 1417(j) of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977, as amended (7 U.S.C. 3152(j)). In accordance with the statutory authority, subject to the availability of funds, the Secretary of Agriculture (USDA), who has delegated the authority to the Director of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), will award grants to: (a) promote and strengthen secondary and 2-year postsecondary agriscience and agribusiness education, and Agriculture in the K-12 Classroom,

**Special Note on Indirect Costs as in-kind matching contributions: Indirect costs may be claimed under the Federal portion of the award budget or, alternatively, indirect costs may be claimed as a matching contribution (if no indirect costs are requested under the Federal portion of the award budget). However, unless explicitly authorized in the RFA, indirect costs may not be claimed on both the Federal portion of the award budget and as a matching contribution, unless the total claimed on both the Federal portion of the award budget and as a matching contribution does not exceed the maximum allowed indirect costs or the institutions negotiated indirect cost rate, whichever is less. An awardee may split the allocation between the Federal and non-Federal portions of the budget only if the total amount of indirect costs charged to the project does not exceed the maximum allowed indirect costs or the institutions negotiated indirect cost rate, whichever is less. For example, if an awardees' indirect costs are capped at 30 percent pursuant to FY 2012 appropriated funds, Section 720 of the Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2012 (Division A of Pub. L. 112-55), the awardee may request 15 percent of the indirect costs on both the Federal portion of the award and as a matching contribution. Or, the awardee may request any similar percentage that, when combined, does not exceed the maximum indirect cost rate of 30 percent. Fully discretionary.

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