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program announcement or Request for Application (RFA).

Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFAs electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions. Cash reports are not applicable. Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFAs electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions. A final Financial Status Report (SF-269) or Federal Financial Report (SF-425) is due within 90 days of the expiration date of the grant and should be submitted to the Awards Management Branch, Office of Extramural Programs at the address listed below, in accordance with instructions contained in 2 CFR 3430.55 (also refer to Section 3015.82 of the Uniform Federal Assistance Regulations).

Awards Management Division Office of Grants and Financial Management National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) STOP 2271 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20250-2271 Telephone: (202) 401-4986. Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFAs electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions. Audits: In accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular No. A-133 (Revised, June 27, 2003), "Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations," nonfederal entities that expend financial assistance of $500,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Nonfederal entities that expend less than $500,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in Circular No. A-133. Audits will be conducted in accordance with guidelines established in the revised OMB Circular No. A-133 and implemented in 7 CFR 3052. This program is also subject to audit by the cognizant Federal audit agency and the USDA Office of Inspector General. Records: In accordance with the Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and other Non-profit Organizations [2 CFR 215, Subpart C, Section 215.53, (OMB Circular A-110)) grantees shall maintain separate records for each grant to ensure that funds are used for authorized purposes. Grant-related records are subject to inspection during the life of the grant and must be retained at least 3 years. Records must be retained beyond the 3-year period if litigation is pending or audit findings have not been resolved. Account Identification:

This represents a "no-year" funds program. PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS: Fiscal Year 2011: In FY 2011, 67 applications were received for consideration. The success rate was 30%. Twenty proposals were funded, yielding a total of 20 masters-level fellowships, and 46 doctoral-level fellowships. Applications addressed the following Targeted Expertise Shortage Areas: Animal and Plant Production; Forest Resources; Agricultural Educators and Communicators; Agricultural Management and Economics; Food Science and Human Nutrition; Sciences for Agricultural Biosecurity; and Integrative Biosciences for Sustainable Food and Agricultural Systems. Fiscal Year 2012: The FY '12 RFA was just released. Approximately 70 applications, and 20 awards are anticipated. Fiscal Year 2013: It is anticipated atha pproximately 70 applications will be received, and 20 projects will be awarded. REGULATIONS, GUIDELINES, AND LITERATURE: 7 CFR Part 3430, Competitive and Noncompetitive Non-formula Grant Programs General Grant Administrative Provisions and Program-Specific Administrative Provisions; 7 CFR Part 3015, USDA Uniform Federal Assistance Regulations; 7 CFR Part 3017, Government wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement) ; 7 CFR Part 3018, New Restrictions on Lobbying; 7 CFR Part 3019, Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-profit Organizations; and 7 CFR Part 3021 USDA implementation of Governmentwide Requirements for Drug-free Workplace (Financial Assistance) Regional or Local Office: None. Headquarters Office: USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Youth, Family, and Community, Division of Community and Education, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2250, , Washington , District of Columbia 20250-2250 Phone: (202) 720-2324 Fax: (202) 720-2030 Website Address: http://www.nifa.usda.gov/ RELATED PROGRAMS: 10.216 1890 Institution Capacity Building Grants; 10.217 Higher Education Challenge Grants; 10.220 Higher Education Multicultural Scholars Program; 10.310 Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) EXAMPLES OF FUNDED PROJECTS: Fiscal Year 2011: Projects were funded in the following Targeted Expertise Shortage Areas: Animal and Plant Production; Forest Resources; Agricultural Management and Economics; Food Science and Human Nutrition; Sciences for Agricultural Biosecurity; and Integrative Biosciences for Sustainable Food and Agricultural Systems. Supported projects contribute to the development of a strong STEM workforce, which is needed to keep this Nations competitiveness, through the research and academic training of graduate students. In addition, the awarded projects support the training of students at the Masters and doctoral levels, in order to fill the nationally identified expertise shortage areas in the food and agricultural sciences; encourage and recruit outstanding students, including those from traditionally underrepresented groups, to enter and complete graduate training in the food and agricultural sciences, and increase the quality and diversity of students completing graduate degrees in the food and agricultural sciences. Further information is available at http://www.nifa.usda.gov/fo/nationalneedsgraduatefellowships.cfm. Fiscal Year 2012: The FY '12 RFA was just released. Pertinent details will be provided by Program at a future date. Fiscal Year 2013: Pertinent details will be provided by Program at a future date. CRITERIA FOR SELECTING PROPOSALS: (1) The degree to which the proposal clearly establishes that the proposed program of graduate training will result in the development of outstanding scientific/professional expertise related to the national need area and in a reasonable period of time; (2) the degree to which the proposed program of study reflects special features

12-1500-0-1-352.

Obligations: (Project Grants) FY 11 $3,663,471; FY 12 est $3,079,950; and FY 13 est $3,556,642 - The difference between the appropriation and obligation numbers reflects legislative authorized set-asides deducted as appropriate, and in some cases the availability of obligational authority from prior years.

Funding for the Food and Agricultural Sciences National Needs Graduate Fellowship Grants program is no-year money. The FY 2010 amount includes carryover funds.

In FY 2012, activities formerly supported under this program will be funded under AFRI. We do not know the amount of anticipated funding for the supported activities under AFRI. Range and Average of Financial Assistance: If minimum or maximum amounts of funding per competitive project grant or cooperative agreement are established, these will be announced in the annual

A reasonable fee, not to exceed seven percent of total Federal funds awarded is permitted under this program, but applicants are encouraged to minimize fee requests due to the small amount of funds available. All fees are subject to negotiation with USDA.

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Indirect Costs: If available, the current rate negotiated with the cognizant Federal negotiating agency should be used. Indirect costs may not exceed the negotiated rate.

such as a combination-disciplinary, approach (inter-disciplinary, multi-disciplinary or cross-disciplinary), a unique collateral specialization in a related discipline, experimental learning opportunities, a unique mentoring program, seminars, or a multi-university collaborative approach; (3) the degree to which the proposal establishes that the institution's faculty, facilities and equipment, instructional support resources, and other attributes are excellent for providing outstanding graduate study and research at the forefront of science and technology related to the chosen area of national need; (4) the degree to which the institution's plans and procedures for recruitment and selection of academically outstanding fellows and for monitoring and facilitating fellow's progress through a program of study reflect excellence as documented in the proposal; (5) the degree to which supporting summary data substantiate program quality in the targeted national need area; (6) the quality of the proposal as reflected by its substantive content, organization, clarity, and accuracy; and (7) any additional evaluation criteria as cited in the annual program announcement published in the Federal Register.

If no rate has been negotiated, a reasonable dollar amount in lieu of indirect costs may be requested, which will be subject to approval by USDA. In the latter case, if an application is recommended for funding, an indirect cost rate application must be submitted to support the amount of indirect costs requested. NIFA will request an indirect cost rate application and provide instructions, as necessary.

An applicant may elect not to charge indirect costs and, instead, use all grant funds for direct costs.

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10.212 SMALL BUSINESS INNOVATION RESEARCH (SBIR Program - Phase I and II) FEDERAL AGENCY: National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Department of Agriculture AUTHORIZATION: This program solicitation is issued pursuant to the Small Business Innovation Development Act of 1982, Public Law 97-219, as amended (15 U.S.C. 638) and Section 630 of the Act making appropriations for Agriculture, Rural Development and Related Agencies programs for fiscal year ending September 30, 1987, and for other purposes, as made applicable by Section 101(a) of Public Law 99-591, 100 Stat. 3341. OBJECTIVES: To stimulate technological innovation in the private sector, strengthen the role of small businesses in meeting Federal research and development needs, increase private sector commercialization of innovations derived from USDA-supported research and development efforts, and foster and encourage participation, by women-owned and socially disadvantaged small business firms in technological innovation. TYPES OF ASSISTANCE:

PROJECT GRANTS

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS:

The selected areas for research are Forests and Related Resources; Plant
Production and Protection-Biology; Animal Production and Protection; Air,
Water and Soils; Food Science and Nutrition; Rural and Community
Development; Aquaculture; Biofuels and Biobased Products; Small and
Mid-Size Farms, Plant Production and Protection-Engineering. The Small
Business Innovation Research Program is carried out in three separate phases:
Phase I projects are supported to determine the scientific or technical feasibility
of ideas submitted by small business applicants on the selected research areas;

Further detailed instructions are provided in the SBIR RFA (solicitation). Fully discretionary. Applicant Eligibility: Applicant Eligibility (1) is organized for profit, with a place of business located in the United States, which operates primarily within the United States, or which makes a significant contribution to the United States economy through the payment of taxes or use of American products, materials or labor; (2) is in the legal form of an individual proprietorship, partnership, limited liability company, corporation, joint venture, association, trust or cooperative, except that where the form is a joint venture, there can be no more than 49 percent participation by foreign business entities in the joint venture; (3) is at least 51 percent owned and controlled by one or more individuals who are citizens of, or permanent resident aliens in, the United States, except in the case of a joint venture, where each entity in the venture must be 51 percent owned and controlled by one or more individuals who are citizens of, or permanent resident aliens in the United States; and (4) has, including its affiliates, not more than 500 employees. The term "affiliates" is defined in greater detail in 13 CFR 121.103. The term "number of employees" is defined in 13 CFR 121.106. Beneficiary Eligibility: Small businesses. Credentials/Documentation: No Credentials or documentation are required. This program is excluded from coverage under OMB Circular No. A-87. Preapplication Coordination: All RFAs are published on the Agencys website and Grants.gov. Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process. Please see the following Grants.gov link for more information: http://www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp. An environmental impact statement is required for this program. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372. Application Procedures: This program is excluded from coverage under OMB Circular No. A-102. OMB Circular No. A-110 applies to this program. Applications should be submitted as outlined in the RFA. Applications must follow the instructions provided per Grants.Gov and in the Agency guide to submitting applications via Grants.gov. Award Procedure: Applications are subjected to a system of peer and merit review in accordance with Section 103 of the Agricultural Research, Extension and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 1613) by a panel of qualified scientists and other appropriate persons who are specialists in the field covered by the proposal. Within the limit of funds available for such purpose, the NIFA Authorized Departmental Officer (ADO) shall make grants to those responsible, eligible applicants whose applications are judged most meritorious under the procedures set forth in the RFA. Reviewers will be selected based upon training and experience in relevant scientific, extension, or education fields, taking into

Phase II awards are made to firms with approaches that appear sufficiently promising as a result of Phase I studies. Only those small businesses previously receiving Phase I awards in either of the two preceding fiscal years are eligible to submit Phase II proposals.

Phase II projects are limited to $450,000 for a period normally not to exceed 24 months; Phase III is to be conducted by the small business concern (including joint ventures and limited partnerships), and will be non-SBIR funded through the exercising of a follow-on funding commitment. The purpose of Phase III is to stimulate technological innovation and the national return on investment from research through the pursuit of commercialization objectives resulting from the USDA-supported work carried out in Phases I and II. Grant funds must be used for allowable costs necessary to conduct approved fundamental and applied research, extension and education objectives to address food and agricultural sciences.

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Fee:

account the following factors: (a) The level of relevant formal scientific, technical education, or extension experience of the individual, as well as the extent to which an individual is engaged in relevant research, education, or extension activities; (b) the need to include as reviewers experts from various areas of specialization within relevant scientific, education, or extension fields; (c) the need to include as reviewers other experts (e.g., producers, range or forest managers/operators, and consumers) who can assess relevance of the applications to targeted audiences and to program needs; (d) the need to include as reviewers experts from a variety of organizational types (e.g., colleges, universities, industry, state and Federal agencies, private profit and non-profit organizations) and geographic locations; (e) the need to maintain a balanced composition of reviewers with regard to minority and female representation and an equitable age distribution; and (f) the need to include reviewers who can judge the effective usefulness to producers and the general public of each application. Evaluation Criteria will be delineated in the RFA. Deadlines: Not Applicable. Range of Approval/Disapproval Time: Section :094 - Deadlines: Dates for specific deadlines are announced in the RFA each fiscal year. Information is also available via our website and may be obtained via the Grants.gov website. Respective links are provided below: http://www.nifa.usda.gov/ http://www.grants.gov Section :095 - Range of Approval/Disapproval Time: From 30 to 180 days. Appeals: Phase I applications may be revised and resubmitted during a later funding cycle, provided the subject matter of the proposal is not changed, and the topic area under which the proposal was originally submitted is still listed in the solicitation. Phase I grantees may apply for a Phase II grant only once for each Phase I project funded. Renewals: Specific details are provided in the Request for Applications (RFA) each fiscal year. Formula and Matching Requirements: This program has no statutory formula. This

program has no matching requirements. Funds are awarded competitively. No formula grants are awarded under this authority. CSREES does not require matching or cost sharing support for this program. MOE requirements are not applicable to this program. Length and Time Phasing of Assistance: Phase I grants are normally limited to 8 months. Phase II grants are normally limited to 2 years. Method of awarding/releasing assistance: by letter of credit. Reports: Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFAs electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions. Cash reports are not applicable. Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFAs electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions. A final Financial Status Report (SF-269) or Federal Financial Report (SF-425) is due within 90 days of the expiration date of the grant and should be submitted to the Awards Management Division, Office of Grants and Financial Management at the address listed below, in accordance with instructions contained in 2 CFR 3430.55 (also refer to Section 3015.82 of the Uniform Federal Assistance Regulations).

1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20250-2271, Telephone: (202) 401-4986. Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFAs electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions. Audits: In accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular No. A-133 (Revised, June 27, 2003), "Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations," nonfederal entities that expend financial assistance of $500,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Nonfederal entities that expend less than $500,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in Circular No. A-133. Periodic audits should be made as part of the recipient's systems of financial management and internal control to meet the terms and conditions of grants and other agreements. This program is also subject to audit by the cognizant Federal audit agency and the USDA Office of Inspector General. Federal audits will be made in accordance with the policies of the Federal Acquisition Regulations, 48 CFR Part 42, to ensure that funds have been applied efficiently, economically, and effectively. Records: In accordance with the Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and other Non-profit Organizations [2 CFR 215, Subpart C, Section 215.53, (OMB Circular A-110)] grantees shall maintain separate records for each grant to ensure that funds are used for authorized purposes. Grant-related records are subject to inspection during the life of the grant and must be retained at least 3 years. Records must be retained beyond the 3-year period if litigation is pending or audit findings have not been resolved. Account Identification:

12-1500-0-1-352.

Obligations: (Project Grants) FY 11 $15,373,399; FY 12 est $17,426,211; and FY 13 est $17,632,584 - The difference between the appropriation and obligation numbers reflects legislative authorized set-asides deducted as appropriate, and in some cases the availability of obligational authority from prior years.

NOTE: Some of these funds are "No Year.". Range and Average of Financial Assistance: If minimum or maximum amounts of funding per competitive project grant or cooperative agreement are established, these will be announced in the annual program announcement or Request for Application (RFA). PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS:

Fiscal Year 2011: SBIR Phase I:

Phase I proposals were solicited in 10 different topic areas: Forests and Related Resources; Plant Production and Protection Biology; Plant Production and Protection Engineering; Animal Production and Protection; Air, Water and Soils; Food Science and Nutrition; Rural Development; Aquaculture, Biofuels and Biobased Products; and Small and Mid-Size Farms. A total of 508 Phase I applications were submitted and 56 projects were funded for a success rate of 11%. A total of $5,527,797 was spent on these projects.

SBIR Phase II:

Phase II proposals were submitted in 10 different topic areas: Forests and
Related Resources; Plant Production and Protection Biology; Plant
Production and Protection Engineering; Animal Production and Protection;
Air, Water and Soils; Food Science and Nutrition; Rural Development;
Aquaculture, Biofuels and Biobased Products; and Small and Mid-Size Farms.
A total of 72 Phasel I applications were submitted and 37 projects were funded
for a success rate of 51%. A total of $16,908,174 was spent on these projects.
Fiscal Year 2012: SBIR Phase I:

Awards Management Division
Office of Grants and Financial Management
National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA),
Department of Agriculture (USDA), STOP 2271,

Phase I proposals were solicited in 10 different topic areas: Forests and Related evaluation methods to determine the strength of the Y-branched timers and to develop methods to grade the timbers.

Resources; Plant Production and Protection Biology; Plant Production and Protection Engineering; Animal Production and Protection; Air, Water and Soils; Food Science and Nutrition; Rural Development; Aquaculture, Biofuels and Biobased Products; and Small and Mid-Size Farms. A total of 451 Phase I applications were submitted and 63 projects were funded for a success rate of 14%. A total of $6,234,159 was spent on these projects.

Determine the feasibility of developing a distributed optical fiber sensor cable for monitoring levels of NH3, CO2 and H2S in animal confinement structures. The air quality monitoring sensor will be coupled with intelligent signal processing technology to control ventilation in order to maintain a safe environment for both animals and people.

SBIR Phase II:

Phase II proposals were solicited in 10 different topic areas: Forests and
Related Resources; Plant Production and Protection Biology; Plant
Production and Protection Engineering; Animal Production and Protection;
Air, Water and Soils; Food Science and Nutrition; Rural Development;
Aquaculture, Biofuels and Biobased Products; and Small and Mid-Size Farms.
A total of 50 Phase II applications were submitted and 25 projects have been
recommended for funding for a success rate of 50%. A total of $10,921,928
has been allocated to fund these 25 Phase II projects. Fiscal Year 2013: SBIR
Phase I:

Develop an educational program with the aim of improving nutritional health and reducing childhood obesity. A digital and video streaming nutrition education curriculum, KickinKitchen.TV will be developed and will consist of two digital webisodes that will be used to teach nutrition concepts and food preparation skills to pre-teens.

Chemical grafting of poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) onto reinforced cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) will create PBS-g-CNW. Polylactic acid (PLA) is a commercially available bioplastic that is biodegradable but too brittle. Incorporation of PBS-g-CNW into PLA is expected to dramatically improve the impact properties of the PLA without compromising other desirable properties.

It is anticipated that between 400 and 500 applications will be submitted and that between 60 and 70 projects will be funded.

SBIR Phase II:

SBIR Phase II:

Phosphate is an essential nutrient for plant productivity but also a major pollutant when it accumulates in surface waters. Affordable and practical phosphate test kits are being developed to permit on-the-spot testing for phosphate so that appropriate decisions can be made as to the proper level of phosphate fertilizer to apply to provide optimal plant growth without causing surface water pollution.

It is anticipated that 50-70 Phase II applications will be received and that
approximately 50% of them will be funded.
REGULATIONS, GUIDELINES, AND LITERATURE:
7 CFR Part 3430, Competitive and Noncompetitive Non-formula Grant
Programs General Grant Administrative Provisions and Program-Specific
Administrative Provisions; 7 CFR Part 3015, USDA Uniform Federal
Assistance Regulations; 7 CFR Part 3017, Government wide Debarment and
Suspension (Nonprocurement) ; 7 CFR Part 3018, New Restrictions on
Lobbying; 7 CFR Part 3019, Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants
and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other
Non-profit Organizations; and 7 CFR Part 3021 USDA implementation of
Governmentwide Requirements for Drug-free Workplace (Financial
Assistance).
Regional or Local Office:

Surface contamination of eggs is an important food safety problem. Optical inspection of white eggs is well developed but not for brown and brown speckled eggs. A non-contact multispectral sensing and machine vision technology is being developed that reliable can inspect brown and brown speckled eggs for various contaminants at speeds up to 10,000 eggs/hour.

Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a potent adjuvant of cell-mediated immunity that has been shown to enhance protection from influenza pathogens and enhance vaccine effectiveness in swine against swine flu. In an effort to develop a lower cost procedure for production of porcine IL-12, a plant system has been developed that can produce fully functional porcine IL-12 adjuvant in a transient tobacco expression system.

None.

Headquarters Office:
USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Bioenergy, Climate and
Environment Division of Environmental Systems, 1400 Independence
Avenue, SW., STOP 2210, Washington, District of Columbia, 20250-2210,
Telephone: (202) 720-5229, Fax: (202) 720-3945.

Red alder is an important hardwood species of the Pacific Northwest but it currently is in short supply. Efforts are underway to develop an alder genetic improvement program involving both red alder and white alder that will lead to the development of elite, well-adapted planting stock. A hybridization program involving red and white alder will also be undertaken for long range stock enhancement.

ADDITIONAL CONTACT:

An effort is being made to develop a 10kW horizontal axis wind turbine that can produce significant energy even in areas with only Class 1 or Class 2 wind speeds and would be of an appropriate size for many small farms. Fiscal Year 2012: SBIR Phase I:

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Food Safety and Nutrition, Division of Food Safety, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2225, Washington, District of Columbia 20250-2225 Phone: (202) 401-1954, Fax (202) 401-4888. , Washington , District of Columbia 20250-2210 Phone: (202) 720-5229 Website Address: http://www.nifa.usda.gov/fo/sbir RELATED PROGRAMS: Not Applicable. EXAMPLES OF FUNDED PROJECTS: Fiscal Year 2011: SBIR Phase I:

Control of the mountain pine beetle (MPB) is a critical problem. The SPLAT (Specialized Pheromone & Lure Application Technology) approach involves the incorporation of the MPB anti-aggregation semiochemical verbenone into a flowable substrate so that verbenone is released over a sustained period of time to control MPB attacks on pine trees.

Hydroponic and LED technologies will be used to determine the feasibility of producing high nutrient, high quality greens in small, urban high density, indoor farms. Test marketing will be done to verify the potential market in urban areas for premium priced, high nutrient greens.

Development of robotic selective harvesting technology will help to make the Florida citrus industry more productive. Modern citrus groves use high density semi-dwarf trees and open hydroponics with optimized nutrient and water availability to accelerate plant growth. To maximize the productivity of these new grove improved harvesting technology is needed.

Test the feasibility of Y-branched timbers as structural elements for new building construction. Procedures are being developed to use non-destructive

Walleye is a highly valued foodfish and sportfish and efforts will be made to determine the feasibility of using hybridization together with intensive, in-tank

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USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Grant funds must be used for allowable costs necessary to conduct approved fundamental and applied research, extension and education objectives to address food and agricultural sciences. Funds shall not be used for the construction of a new building or facility or the acquisition, expansion, remodeling, or alteration of an existing building or facility (including site grading and improvement, and architect fees).

Funds may not be used for any purposes other than those approved in the grant award documents.

Funds shall not be used for tuition remission.

Pertinent details will be provided by Program Unit at a future date. CRITERIA FOR SELECTING PROPOSALS: (a) The proposing firm must qualify as a small business concern as specified in the SBIR solicitation; (b) The proposal must meet the Proposal Content and Format requirements as described in subsection 3.3 of the SBIR solicitation; (c) Proposals must be limited to one research problem (see subsection 3.1 of the SBIR solicitation); (d) The proposed budget must be within the dollar limit identified in subsection 1.2 of the SBIR solicitation; (e) The proposed duration of Phase I projects should normally not exceed 8 months, except in special, justified circumstances, and the duration of Phase II projects should normally not exceed 24 months. Where a proposed research project requires more than 8 months to complete in Phase I, a longer grant period, not to exceed 20 months, may be considered. An applicant of a Phase I project with an anticipated duration beyond 8 months should specify and justify the length of duration in the proposal at the time of its submission to USDA in order for it to be considered; (f) Proposals must cover scientific research activities only (see subsection 3.1 of the SBIR solicitation); (g) The proposed Phase I research must fall within a solicited topic area; (h) A proposal must contain adequate scientific/technical information to state clearly the research plan and objectives. USDA reserves the right not to submit for review any proposal which it finds to have insufficient scientific/technical information; (i) A resubmitted proposal must address concerns of the previous review panel. USDA reserves the right not to submit for review any proposal found not to be responsive to the previous review; and (i) Is it clear that the project director will work a minimum of 51 percent of his/her time for the small business firm during the period of the grant and that the small business firm will conduct a minimum of two-thirds of the research effort?.

Funds shall not be used for fixed equipment.

Section 704 of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2012 (P.L. 112-55) limits indirect costs to 10 percent of the total Federal funds provided under each cooperative agreements or similar arrangements. Therefore, when preparing budgets, applicants should limit their requests for recovery of indirect costs to the lesser of their institutions official negotiated indirect cost rate or the equivalent of 10 percent of total Federal funds awarded. Fully discretionary. Applicant Eligibility: Land-grant colleges or universities, other universities, State agricultural experiment stations, State cooperative extension services, nonprofit organizations, and individuals with demonstrable expertise, or Federal or State governmental entities. Beneficiary Eligibility: Land-grant colleges or universities, other universities, State agricultural experiment stations, State cooperative extension services, nonprofit organizations, and individuals with demonstrable expertise, or Federal or State governmental entities. Credentials/Documentation: No Credentials or documentation are required. OMB Circular No. A-87 applies to this program. Preapplication Coordination: All RFAs are published on the Agencys website and Grants.gov. Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process. Please see the following Grants.gov link for more information: http://www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp. An environmental impact statement is required for this program. This program is excluded from coverage

10.215 SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION SARE FEDERAL AGENCY: National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Department of Agriculture AUTHORIZATION: Section 1619-1624 of the Food, Agriculture, Conservation and Trade Act of 1990 (FACTA), Public Law 101-624 (7 U.S.C. 5801). , 7 U.S.C 5801; Section 1622 of FACTA (7 U.S.C. 5812), and for selected national projects, 7 U.S.C 5812. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (SARE) program is to encourage research designed to increase our knowledge

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