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Public secondary schools or public or private nonprofit junior and community colleges. Beneficiary Eligibility: Public secondary schools or public or private nonprofit junior and community colleges.

Specific details are provided in the Request for Applications (RFA) each fiscal year. Formula and Matching Requirements: This program has no statutory formula. Matching Requirements: Percent: 100.%. A grant recipient is required to match the USDA funds awarded on a dollar-for-dollar (100%) basis from non-Federal sources. Matching funds are not required to come in any particular amount from any one source. However, all matching funds pledged in this application must be accompanied by documentation. See Part IV, B.5. SF 424 (R&R) Budget Fed and Non-Fed, Field K-Budget Justification, for additional details.

Credentials/Documentation:

No Credentials or documentation are required. OMB Circular No. A-87 applies to this program. Preapplication Coordination: All RFAs are published on the Agencys website and Grants.gov. Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process. Please see the following Grants.gov link for more information: http://www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp. An environmental impact statement is required for this program. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372.

Application Procedures:

OMB Circular No. A-102 applies to this program. OMB Circular No. A-110 applies to this program. Applications should be submitted as outlined in the RFA. Applications must follow the instructions provided per Grants.Gov and in the Agency guide to submitting applications via Grants.gov.

Award Procedure:

Applications are subjected to a system of peer and merit review in accordance with section 103 of the Agricultural Research, Extension and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 1613) by a panel of qualified scientists and other appropriate persons who are specialists in the field covered by the proposal. Within the limit of funds available for such purpose, the NIFA Authorized Departmental Officer (ADO) shall make grants to those responsible, eligible applicants whose applications are judged most meritorious under the procedures set forth in the RFA.

**Note #2 - Use of Indirect Costs as In-Kind Matching Contributions. Indirect costs may be claimed under the Federal portion of the award budget or, alternatively, indirect costs may be claimed as a matching contribution (if no indirect costs are requested under the Federal portion of the award budget). However, unless explicitly authorized in the RFA, indirect costs may not be claimed on both the Federal portion of the award budget and as a matching contribution, unless the total claimed on both the Federal portion of the award budget and as a matching contribution does not exceed the maximum allowed indirect costs or the institutions negotiated indirect cost rate, whichever is less. An awardee may split the allocation between the Federal and non-Federal portions of the budget only if the total amount of indirect costs charged to the project does not exceed the maximum allowed indirect costs or the institutions negotiated indirect cost rate, whichever is less. For example, if an awardees indirect costs are capped at 22 percent pursuant to section 1462(a) of NARETPA (7 U.S.C. 3310(a)), the awardee may request 11 percent of the indirect costs on both the Federal portion of the award and as a matching contribution. Or, the awardee may request any similar percentage that, when combined, does not exceed the maximum indirect cost rate of 22 percent. MOE requirements are not applicable to this program. Length and Time Phasing of Assistance: The term of a competitive grant under this authority may not exceed five (5) years. Method of awarding/releasing assistance: by letter of credit. Reports: Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFAs electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions. Cash reports are not applicable. Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFAs electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions. A final Financial Status Report (SF-269) or Federal Financial Report (SF-425) is due within 90 days of the expiration date of the grant and should be submitted to the address listed below, in accordance with instructions contained in 2 CFR 3430.55 (also refer to Section 3015.82 of the Uniform Federal Assistance Regulations).

Reviewers will be selected based upon training and experience in relevant scientific, extension, or education fields, taking into account the following factors: (a) The level of relevant formal scientific, technical education, or extension experience of the individual, as well as the extent to which an individual is engaged in relevant research, education, or extension activities; (b) the need to include as reviewers experts from various areas of specialization within relevant scientific, education, or extension fields; (c) the need to include as reviewers other experts (e.g., producers, range or forest managers/operators, and consumers) who can assess relevance of the applications to targeted audiences and to program needs; (d) the need to include as reviewers experts from a variety of organizational types (e.g., colleges, universities, industry, state and Federal agencies, private profit and non-profit organizations) and geographic locations; (e) the need to maintain a balanced composition of reviewers with regard to minority and female representation and an equitable age distribution; and (f) the need to include reviewers who can judge the effective usefulness to producers and the general public of each application.

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conducted for that year. Nonfederal entities that expend less than $500,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in Circular No. A-133. Audits will be conducted in accordance with guidelines established in the revised OMB Circular No. A-133 and implemented in 7 CFR 3052. This program is also subject to audit by the cognizant Federal audit agency and the USDA Office of Inspector General.

3 Regular: $133,047; 5 Joint: $480,781; and 1 (partial) Large-Scale Comprehensive Initiatives (LCI): $42,758 (balance of funds in FY13).

Joint and LCI Project Proposals requiring partnerships and sharing of grant funds between two or more institutions.

Records:

The funding ratio for this program in FY11 was 24%.

In accordance with the Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and other Non-profit Organizations [2 CFR 215, Subpart C, Section 215.53, (OMB Circular A-110)] grantees shall maintain separate records for each grant to ensure that funds are used for authorized purposes. Grant-related records are subject to inspection during the life of the grant and must be retained at least 3 years. Records must be retained beyond the 3-year period if litigation is pending or audit findings have not been resolved.

Funded projects should address one or more of the following educational strategies: (a) Curriculum Development, Instructional Delivery Systems and Expanding Student Career Opportunities;

(b) Increasing Faculty Teaching Competencies; and

Account Identification:

12-1500-0-1-352.

Obligations:

(c) Facilitating Interaction with Other Academic Institutions. Also in 2011, all projects had to address one of five Priority Areas: Global Food Security and Hunger, Climate Change, Sustainable Energy, Childhood Obesity, and Food Safety. Fiscal Year 2013: Pertinent data to be provided by Program at a future date.

REGULATIONS, GUIDELINES, AND LITERATURE:

(Project Grants) FY 11 $915,852; FY 12 est $853,500; and FY 13 est $928,535 - The difference between the appropriation and obligation numbers reflects legislative authorized set-asides deducted as appropriate, and in some cases the availability of obligational authority from prior years. Range and Average of Financial Assistance: If minimum or maximum amounts of funding per competitive project grant or cooperative agreement are established, these will be announced in the annual program announcement or Request for Application (RFA).

PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS:

7 CFR Part 3430, Competitive and Noncompetitive Non-formula Grant
Programs General Grant Administrative Provisions and Program-Specific
Administrative Provisions; 7 CFR Part 3015, USDA Uniform Federal
Assistance Regulations; 7 CFR Part 3017, Government wide Debarment and
Suspension (Nonprocurement) ; 7 CFR Part 3018, New Restrictions on
Lobbying; 7 CFR Part 3019, Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants
and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other
Non-profit Organizations; and 7 CFR Part 3021 USDA implementation of
Governmentwide Requirements for Drug-free Workplace (Financial
Assistance).

Fiscal Year 2011: For the FY 2011 award cycle, a total of $905,573 was available for project grant awards after subtracting administrative costs.

Regional or Local Office:

A total of 69 academic institutions submitted applications requesting $7,634,963. In March 2011, a sixteen-member peer review panel evaluated these applications. The peer panel included faculty members from secondary schools, two-year postsecondary, land grant and non-land grant colleges and universities, and practitioners from the food and agricultural sciences community.

None.

Headquarters Office:

USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Youth, Family, and Community, Division of Community and Education, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2250, Washington, District of Columbia 20250-2250 Phone: (202) 720-2324 Fax: (202) 720-2030.

Funds were available to support a total of 15 awards in the following Project Types : 2 Conference/Planning: $ 45,728; 8 Regular: $300,812; 5 Joint: $559,033; and no Large-Scale Comprehensive Initiatives (LCI). Joint and LCI Project Proposals requiring partnerships and sharing of grant funds between two or more institutions.

Website Address:

http://www.nifa.usda.gov/

RELATED PROGRAMS:

The funding ratio for this program in FY11 was 22%.

10.210 Food and Agricultural Sciences National Needs Graduate Fellowship Grants; 10.216 1890 Institution Capacity Building Grants; 10.217 Higher Education Challenge Grants

EXAMPLES OF FUNDED PROJECTS:

Funded projects should address one or more of the following educational strategies: (a) Curriculum Development, Instructional Delivery Systems and Expanding Student Career Opportunities; (b) Increasing Faculty Teaching Competencies; and (c) Facilitating Interaction with Other Academic Institutions. Also in 2011, all projects had to address one of five Priority Areas: Global Food Security and Hunger, Climate Change, Sustainable Energy, Childhood Obesity, and Food Safety. Fiscal Year 2012: For the FY 2012 award cycle, a total of $843,224 was available for project grant awards after subtracting administrative costs.

Fiscal Year 2011: Develop a comprehensive, agriculture-themed, 6-8 grade focused curriculum unit on food safety for distribution to teachers nationwide, and specifically targeted to educators who lack STEM training. Modules will provide tools teachers need to begin incorporating STEM education into their state-mandated curriculum, ultimately resulting in more students exploring agriculture and food safety careers.

A total of 62 academic institutions submitted applications requesting $6,794,068. In March 2012, an eighteen-member peer review panel evaluated these applications. The peer panel included faculty members from secondary schools, two-year postsecondary, land grant and non-land grant colleges and universities, and practitioners from the food and agricultural sciences community.

Create a professional development curriculum and certified training program for K-8 teachers to ensure teachers have access to high quality materials, curricula, and training to implement hands-on, field-based K-8 STEM education. Professional training will increase teacher competency and confidence in teaching the sciences through experiential learning modalities. Students will have access to educational programs that will increase their knowledge of food and agriculture education and of how to create sustainable community food systems and educators will be able to train other K-8 classroom teachers using a Train the Trainer model.

Funds were available to support a total of 15 awards in the following Project Types : 3 FY '11 Continuation: $164,147; 1 Conference/Planning: $ 22,491;

Produce a mobile lab to provide precision agriculture hands-on activities and demonstrations. The mobile lab will include an ATV modified with precision agriculture technology to simulate commercial-scale systems, and a trailer with related technology and instructional equipment, to deliver course content to four regional high schools.

Research Program) is a competitive grants program supporting fundamental and/ or applied agricultural research projects that address high priority concerns of tribal, national or multi-state significance. The program funds investigative and analytical studies and experimentation in the food and agricultural sciences (as defined in section 1404 of the NARETPA (7 U.S.C. 3103) and Part VIII, E. of this RFA). TCRGP seeks to advance the body of knowledge in the basic and applied natural and social sciences within the food and agricultural sciences.

TYPES OF ASSISTANCE:

Project Grants (Cooperative Agreements)

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS:

Curriculum materials will be developed and made available to secondary agriculture teachers throughout the U.S. focusing on food safety and security content and topics. The curriculum materials will be based upon content standards adopted at state and national levels. A food systems approach will provide the context for the content included in the curriculum materials to increase student awareness and knowledge of food safety and security that extend beyond the producer level. In addition, STEM content and concepts along with career opportunities in the food and agricultural sciences will be integrated into the curriculum. Fiscal Year 2012: Enhance teacher professional development activities through high-quality structured training in The Curriculum for Agricultural Science Education (CASE) and Delta training. The project will encourage high school teachers to work closely with university faculty to align curricula and to introduce new depth to sustainable energy and phytotechnology lesson plans. Anticipated results are for an increased number of students to be exposed to and develop knowledge of opportunities in agriculture, and for those students to be more adequately prepared to move seamlessly to a postsecondary institution and careers in agriculture-related industries.

This research grants program is authorized to conduct agricultural research that addresses high priority concerns of tribal, national or multi-State significance. NIFA has determined that grant funds may not be used for the renovation or refurbishment of research, education, or extension space; the purchase or installation of fixed equipment in such space; or the planning, repair, rehabilitation, acquisition, or construction of buildings or facilities.

Enable high school students to operate and manage a small-scale oyster nursery. This nursery will employ, on a smaller scale, the same equipment and techniques used by commercial aquaculturists, and will be the first of its kind in New York Harbor. Students will directly manage and operate the nursery and produce oysters for use in restoration projects.

Develop a sustainable agriculture certificate and associates degree program to allow students to further their education in agriculture and/or other STEM disciplines and create a pathway to the attainment of advanced degrees through transfer articulation agreements.

Increase faculty teaching competencies and develop curriculum and instructional delivery services for grade 10-14 high school and community college students and educators across the nation by developing a set of research-based instructional webinars. Content will include emerging technologies in sustainable and renewable agriculture, a web-based Introduction to Agriculture-based Sustainable and Renewable Energy course, and instructional activities available in a modular format that includes emerging research-based information and science and inquiry-based activities. Fiscal Year 2013: Pertinent data to be provided by Program at a future date.

Section 720 of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act,
2012 (Pub.L. No. 112-55) limits indirect costs to 30 percent of the total Federal
funds provided under each award. Therefore, when preparing budgets,
applicants should limit their requests for recovery of indirect costs to the lesser
of their institutions official negotiated indirect cost rate or the equivalent of 30
percent of total Federal funds awarded. Fully discretionary.
Applicant Eligibility:
Bay Mills Community College, Blackfeet Community College, Cankdeska
Cikana Community College, Cheyenne River Community College, Dine
Community College, D-Q University, Dullknife Memorial College, Fond Du
Lac Community College, Fort Belknap Community College, Fort Berthold
Community College, Fort Peck Community College, LacCourte Orielles
Ojibwa Community College, Little Big Horn Community College, Nebraska
Indian Community College, Northwest Indian College, Oglala Lakota College,
Salish Kootenai College, Sinte Gleska University, Sisseton Wahpeton
Community College, Sitting Bull College, Stonechild Community College,
Turtle Mountain Community College, United Tribes Technical College,
Southwest Indian Polytechnic Institute, Institute of American Indian Arts,
Crownpoint Institute of Technology, Haskell Indian National University, Leech
Lake Tribal College, College of the Menominee Nation, and Little Priest Tribal
College.
Beneficiary Eligibility:
Bay Mills Community College, Blackfeet Community College, Cankdeska
Cikana Community College, Cheyenne River Community College, Dine
Community College, D-Q University, Dullknife Memorial College, Fond Du
Lac Community College, Fort Belknap Community College, Fort Berthold
Community College, Fort Peck Community College, LacCourte Oriellese
Ojibwa Community College, Little Big Horn Community College, Nebraska
Indian Community College, Northwest Indian College, Oglala Lakota College,
Salish Kootenai College, Sinte Gleska University, Sisseton Wahpeton
Community College, Sitting Bull College, Stonechild Community College,
Turtle Mountain Community College, United Tribes Technical College,
Southwest Indian Polytechnic Institute, Institute of American Indian Arts,
Crownpoint Institute of Technology, Haskell Indian Nations University, Leech
Lake Tribal College, College of the Menominee Nation, and Little Priest Tribal
College.

CRITERIA FOR SELECTING PROPOSALS:

Within guidelines established for the program as described in the Request for Application (RFA).

10.227 1994 INSTITUTIONS RESEARCH PROGRAM

Tribal Colleges Research Grants Program (TCRGP) FEDERAL AGENCY:

National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Department of Agriculture

AUTHORIZATION:

Credentials/Documentation:

Section 1405 of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (NARETPA), as amended (7 U.S.C. 3121), designates the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) as the lead Federal Agency for agricultural research, extension, and teaching in the food and agricultural sciences. Authority for this program is contained in the Equity in Educational Land-Grant Status Act of 1994 (7 U.S.C. 301 note), as amended by the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 7601 note). In accordance with the statutory authority, subject to the availability of funds, the Secretary of Agriculture may award competitive grants, as defined in section 536 of the Equity in Educational Land Grant Status Act of 1994 (7 U.S.C. 301 note), to assist the 1994 Land-Grant Institutions in conducting agricultural research that addresses high priority concerns of tribal, national or multi-state significance., 7 U.S.C 301 note.

No Credentials or documentation are required. OMB Circular No. A-87 applies to this program. Preapplication Coordination: All RFAs are published on the Agencys website and Grants.gov. Applicants must complete the Grants.gov registration process. Please see the following Grants.gov link for more information: http://www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp. An environmental impact statement is required for this program. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O. 12372.

Application Procedures:

OBJECTIVES:

OMB Circular No. A-102 applies to this program. OMB Circular No. A-110

The Tribal Colleges Research Grants Program (TCRGP) (aka 1994 Institutions

applies to this program. Applications should be submitted as outlined in the RFA. Applications must follow the instructions provided per Grants.Gov and in the Agency guide to submitting applications via Grants.gov.

Award Procedure:

Applications are subjected to a system of peer and merit review in accordance with section 103 of the Agricultural Research, Extension and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 1613) by a panel of qualified scientists and other appropriate persons who are specialists in the field covered by the proposal. Within the limit of funds available for such purpose, the NIFA Authorized Departmental Officer (ADO) shall make grants to those responsible, eligible applicants whose applications are judged most meritorious under the procedures set forth in the RFA.

Reports: Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFAs electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions. NIFA uses the SF-425, Federal Financial Report to monitor cash. Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFAs electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions. A final Financial Status Report (SF-269) or Federal Financial Report (SF-425) is due within 90 days of the expiration date of the grant and should be submitted to the address listed below, in accordance with instructions contained in 2 CFR 3430.55 (also refer to Section 3015.82 of the Uniform Federal Assistance Regulations).

Reviewers will be selected based upon training and experience in relevant scientific, extension, or education fields, taking into account the following factors: (a) The level of relevant formal scientific, technical education, or extension experience of the individual, as well as the extent to which an individual is engaged in relevant research, education, or extension activities; (b) the need to include as reviewers experts from various areas of specialization within relevant scientific, education, or extension fields; (c) the need to include as reviewers other experts (e.g., producers, range or forest managers/operators, and consumers) who can assess relevance of the applications to targeted audiences and to program needs; (d) the need to include as reviewers experts from a variety of organizational types (e.g., colleges, universities, industry, state and Federal agencies, private profit and non-profit organizations) and geographic locations; (e) the need to maintain a balanced composition of reviewers with regard to minority and female representation and an equitable age distribution; and (f) the need to include reviewers who can judge the effective usefulness to producers and the general public of each application.

Awards Management Division (AMD) Office of Grants and Financial Management (OGFM) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) STOP 2271 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20250-2271 Telephone: (202) 401-4986. Grantees are to submit initial project information and annual summary reports to NIFAs electronic, Web-based inventory system that facilitates both grantee submissions of project outcomes and public access to information on Federally-funded projects. The details of the reporting requirements are included in the award terms and conditions.

Audits:

Evaluation Criteria will be delineated in the RFA.

Deadlines:

Contact the headquarters or regional office, as appropriate, for application deadlines.

In accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular No. A-133 (Revised, June 27, 2003), "Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations," nonfederal entities that expend financial assistance of $500,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Nonfederal entities that expend less than $500,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in Circular No. A-133. Audits will be conducted in accordance with guidelines established in the revised OMB Circular No. A-133, Audits of States, Local Governments, and Nonprofit Organizations, and implemented in 7 CFR 3052. This program is also subject to audit by the cognizant Federal audit agency and the USDA Office of Inspector General. Records:

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time: Section :094 - Deadlines: Dates for specific deadlines are announced in the RFA each fiscal year. Information is also available via our website and may be obtained via the Grants.gov website. Respective links are provided below: http://www.nifa.usda.gov/ http://www.grants.gov

Section :095 - Range of Approval/Disapproval Time: From 30 to 180 days.

In accordance with the Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and other Non-profit Organizations (2 CFR 215, Subpart C, Section 215.53, (OMB Circular A-110)] grantees shall maintain separate records for each grant to ensure that funds are used for authorized purposes. Grant-related records are subject to inspection during the life of the grant and must be retained at least three (3) years. Records must be retained beyond the three-year period if litigation is pending or audit findings have not been resolved.

Appeals:
Not Applicable.

Renewals:

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project grant awards after subtracting administrative costs.

A total of 11 applications requesting a total of $2,161,984 were received in this years competition. In March 2011, a 9-member peer review panel evaluated these applications via an on-line conference. The peer panel included faculty and administrators from land grant and non-land grant colleges and universities and practitioners from the food and agricultural sciences community.

Of the 11 applications, 7 were selected as high priority projects for full funding. These received $1,400,000 in grants. The remaining $284,270 was divided among the remaining applicants for much smaller micro-grants to develop demonstration projects or feasibility studies. This was done in to fulfill the programs mission of building capacity at 1994 Land Grant Institutions. The applicants who received these smaller grants were able to explore their ideas and plan improvements or try an entirely new project based on their findings.

The funding ratio for this program in FY '11 was 100 percent.

Funded projects should address one or more of the following research areas:
Agricultural Social Sciences (Includes Agricultural Education, Agricultural
Communications, and Rural Sociology)
Human Nutrition Dietetics
Environmental Sciences Management
Conservation and Renewable Natural Resources (includes Forestry)
Family and Consumer Sciences (includes Textiles and excludes Human
Nutrition). Fiscal Year 2012: For the FY 2012 award cycle, $1,681,948 was
available for project grant awards after subtracting administrative costs.

Programs General Grant Administrative Provisions and Program-Specific Administrative Provisions; 7 CFR Part 3015, USDA Uniform Federal Assistance Regulations; 7 CFR Part 3017, Government wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement) ; 7 CFR Part 3018, New Restrictions on Lobbying; 7 CFR Part 3019, Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-profit Organizations; and 7 CFR Part 3021 USDA implementation of Governmentwide Requirements for Drug-free Workplace (Financial Assistance). Regional or Local Office: None. Headquarters Office: USDA, NIFA, National Program Leader, Institute of Youth, Family, and Community, Division of Community and Education, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., STOP 2250, Washington , District of Columbia 20250-2250 Phone: (202) 720-2324 Fax: (202) 720-2030 Website Address: http://www.nifa.usda.gov/ RELATED PROGRAMS: 10.001 Agricultural Research_Basic and Applied Research; 10.200 Grants for Agricultural Research, Special Research Grants; 10.202 Cooperative Forestry Research; 10.203 Payments to Agricultural Experiment Stations Under the Hatch Act; 10.205 Payments to 1890 Land-Grant Colleges and Tuskegee University; 10.207 Animal Health and Disease Research; 10.219 Biotechnology Risk Assessment Research; 10.250 Agricultural and Rural Economic Research; 10.652 Forestry Research EXAMPLES OF FUNDED PROJECTS: Fiscal Year 2011: For one project, two institutions are leading investigations of the aquatic invasive macrophyte flowering rush (Butomus umbellatus). The goal of this research is to gather basic information to assess how flowering rush expansion will impact native fish recovery. One lake has experienced non-native fish and macroinvertebrate introductions that alter food webs resulting in a fishery dominated by 80% non-natives, and culturally and ecologically important native westslope cutthroat and bull trout natives have declined to 15% of the fish assemblage.

For the first time in the programs history applicants had the option of applying for student-led or community-driven research projects. These projects were for smaller amounts of money, but let schools focus on building scientific capacity at their institutions rather than conduct research investigations that they didnt have the facilities to perform. The 1994 Land Grants that did have advanced research capacity maintained the option of applying for traditional grant funding.

The new RFA drew a record response of 24 applications requesting a total of $3,167,261. In May, a 9-member peer review panel met via distance conferencing and evaluated these applications. The peer panel included faculty and administrators from land grant and non-land grant colleges and universities and practitioners from the food and agricultural sciences community.

Funds were available to support a total of 14 awards for a total of $1,856,801. The additional $174,853 was obtained from 2004 and 2005 money as these are no-year funds and do not return to Treasury.

One Tribe has maintained a Bison herd since the 1930s. In recent years the calving rate of the 800 head herd has been below 50 percent. One collaboration proposes to study the nutrition, behavior, and genetic integrity of the herd in order to better manage the herd's reproduction. The proposed study builds on a current research characterizing reproductive diseases in the herd and expands the Tribe's holistic approach to maintaining the herd's reproductive success. Fiscal Year 2012: One college proposes to develop BATS (Broadening Achievements Together in STEM) which will enrich STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) research capacity, and allow us to recruit and retain Native American students, and produce high-quality graduates with a comprehensive understanding of research methodologies and experience working with a team of scientist.

The project breakdown was as follows:

4 - Student Projects - $231,819 3 - Community Projects - $255,000 and 7 - Research Projects - $1,369,982.

The funding ratio for this program in FY '12 was 58 percent.

A majority Funded projects address one or more of the following research
topics:
Agricultural Social Sciences - 23 %
Animal Sciences - 21%
Conservation - 17%
Environmental Sciences Management - 13% and
Human Nutrition Dietetics - 7%

New regional energy drilling has local residence worried about the water quality in the region and how intensive energy exploration will affect water for from a human health and ecological perspective. Students will gather baseline Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH) fingerprint data. TPH fingerprinting will be established on the Reservation during petroleum related activities (drilling and transport). The timing of this research is very important for the Reservation as petroleum development is in the initial year. The data collected using biological, chemical and physical parameters is crucial in establishing baseline data in pristine waterways on the Reservation.

Other prominent subject areas included agribusiness, bio-fuels, consumer science, food science technology, pest management, plant sciences and water sciences. Fiscal Year 2013: Pertinent data will be provided by Program at a future date. REGULATIONS, GUIDELINES, AND LITERATURE: 7 CFR Part 3430, Competitive and Noncompetitive Non-formula Grant

Reports show the highest percent of students fail because of poor attendance, which is informally found to be related to many different reasons most often related to lack of planning and not having a clear goal. United Tribes Technical college researchers will explore how to assist students with adjusting to life on campus, setting career goals and planning for college and career success.

Succulent plants, such as Agave, Opuntia, and Yucca species, which were

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