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AGENCY INDEX SUMMARY

www.eac.gov.

Commission is to eliminate these conditions, concentrating its efforts to develop water, sewer, energy and telecommunications infrastructure; providing job skills and employment related education, as well as entrepreneurship, technology and business development; provide basic health care and other public services for those areas that are severely economically distressed and underdeveloped; and to promote resource conservation, tourism, recreation, and preservation of open spaces in a manner consistent with economic development goals; and finally, to promote the development of renewable and alternative energy sources.

UNITED STATES INSTITUTE OF PEACE (91.001-91.999)

U.S. ELECTION ASSISTANCE COMMISSION (90.400-90.499)

The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) was established by the Help America Vote Act of 2002 (HAVA). Central to its role, the Commission serves as a national clearinghouse and resource for information and review of procedures with respect to the administration of Federal elections. According to the text of HAVA, the law was enacted to, establish a program to provide funds to States to replace punch card voting systems, to establish the Election Assistance Commission to assist in the administration of Federal elections and to otherwise provide assistance with the administration of certain Federal election laws and programs, to establish minimum election administration standards for States and units of local government with responsibility for the administration of Federal elections, and for other purposes. Excerpt from The Help America Vote Act of 2002 The Help America Vote Act of 2002 (HAVA) requires the Election Assistance Commission (EAC) to: Generate technical guidance on the administration of federal elections. Produce voluntary voting systems guidelines. Research and report on matters that affect the administration of federal elections. Otherwise provide information and guidance with respect to laws, procedures, and technologies affecting the administration of Federal elections. Administer payments to States to meet HAVA requirements. Provide grants for election technology development and for pilot programs to test election technology. Manage funds targeted to certain programs designed to encourage youth participation in elections. Develop a national program for the testing, certification, and decertification of voting systems. Maintain the national mail voter registration form that was developed in accordance with the National Voter Registration Act of 1993 (NVRA), report to Congress every two years on the impact of the NVRA on the administration of federal elections, and provide information to States on their responsibilities under that law. Audit persons who received federal funds authorized by HAVA from the General Services Administration or the Election Assistance Commission. Submit an annual report to Congress describing EAC activities for the previous fiscal year. About the U.S. Election Assistance Commission. The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) was established by the Help America Vote Act of 2002 (HAVA). Central to its role, the Commission serves as a national clearinghouse and resource for information and review of procedures with respect to the administration of Federal elections. HAVA requires the EAC to: Develop technical guidance on the administration of federal elections. Produce voluntary voting systems guidelines. Research and report on matters that affect the administration of federal elections. Provide information and guidance with respect to laws, procedures, and technologies affecting the administration of Federal elections. Administer payments to States to meet HAVA requirements. Provide grants for election technology development and for pilot programs to test election technology. Manage funds targeted to certain programs designed to encourage youth participation in elections. Develop a national program for the testing, certification, and decertification of voting systems. Maintain the national mail voter registration form that was developed in accordance with the National Voter Registration Act of 1993 (NVRA), report to Congress every two years on the impact of the NVRA on the administration of federal elections, and provide information to States on their responsibilities under that law. Audit persons who received federal funds authorized by HAVA from the General Services Administration or the Election Assistance Commission. Submit an annual report to Congress describing EAC activities for the previous fiscal year. For additional information, visit the U.S. Election Assistance Commission online at

The United States Institute of Peace was established as an independent, Federal, nonprofit corporation by act of October 19, 1984 (22 U.S.C. 4603). It was established to strengthen the Nation's capacity to promote international peace and the peaceful resolution of conflicts among the peoples and nations of the world. The purpose of the Institute is to develop and disseminate knowledge about the peaceful resolution of international conflict. To accomplish this the Institute has set the following goals: To provide creative practical insights through research, education, and training on negotiation, mediation, and other skills to those actively engaged in resolving international conflicts; to expand the body of knowledge about the nature and processes of peace, war, and international conflict management; and to disseminate information to the public about these subjects. Among the Institute's instruments are grants, fellowships, a library, and in-house projects. The grants program provides financial support to nonprofit organizations, including private colleges and universities; official public institutions, including public schools, colleges, universities, libraries, and Federal, State, and local agencies; and individuals, whether or not they are associated with nonprofit or official public institutions. The Jennings Randolph Program for International Peace offers senior fellowships annually to practitioners or scholars in the U.S. and around the world who join the Institute for about ten months to work on projects concerning the sources and nature of international conflict and ways of managing conflict and sustaining peace. The program also awards Peace Scholar Dissertation Fellowships annually to outstanding doctoral students enrolled in an accredited university in the U.S. who are researching or writing a dissertation that promises to contribute knowledge relevant to the formulation of policy on international peace and conflict issues. The Jeannette Rankin Library Program is developing four main components on international peacemaking: a specialized research library; a network with and support for other libraries, both specialized and public; an oral history resource; and bibliographic as well as other data bases. Institute-directed projects under the Education and Public Information Program include an educational TV program and cassette programs on such topics as U.S.-Soviet summitry and a National Peace Essay Contest for high school students. The in-house Research and Studies is completing a broad, systematic examination of peace and conflict management theories and features workshops and seminars. Institute publications include biennial report to Congress and the President; a newsletter, The Untied States Institute of Peace Journal; and short issue papers, in brief. For more information please visit the Institute's web sit at www.usip.org

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (93.001-93.999)

The Secretary of HHS advises the President on health, welfare, and income security plans, policies, and programs of the Federal government. The Secretary administers these functions through the Office of the Secretary and the Department's 11 operating divisions, including a budget of $460 billion and a workforce of 65,000 employees. Supports cross-cutting research on health care systems, health care quality and cost issues, and effectiveness of medical treatments. Provides a system of health surveillance to monitor and prevent the outbreak of diseases. With the assistance of States and other partners, CDC guards against international disease transmission, maintains national health statistics and provides for immunization services, and supports research into disease and injury prevention. Supports a network of 37 hospitals, 60 health centers, 3 school health centers, 46 health stations and 34 urban Indian health centers to provide services to nearly 1.5 million American Indians and Alaska Natives of 557 federally recognized tribes. Administers the Medicare and Medicaid programs, that provide health care to America's aged and indigenous

AGENCY INDEX SUMMARY

populations. About one in every four Americans, including nearly 18 million children and nursing homes for low-income elderly persons are covered. CMS also administers the new Children's Health Insurance Program through approved State plans that cover more than 2.2 million children.

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (93.506, 93.511, 93.519, 93.525, 93.529, 93.536-93.537, 93.545-93.546, 93.609-93.611, 93.621, 93.624, 93.626-93.627, 93.720, 93.767-93.768, 93.770, 93.773-93.775, 93.777-93.780, 93.784, 93.789-93.791, 93.793, 93.796) Administers the Medicare and Medicaid programs, that provide health care to America's aged and indigenous populations. About one in every four Americans, including nearly 18 million children and nursing homes for low-income elderly persons are covered. CMS also administers the new Children's Health Insurance Program through approved State plans that cover more than 2.2 million children.

Administration for Children and Families (93.009-93.010, 93.060, 93.075-93.076, 93.086-93.087, 93.090-93.093, 93.235, 93.254, 93.508, 93.550-93.551, 93.556-93.558, 93.560, 93.563-93.564, 93.566-93.570, 93.575-93.576, 93.579, 93.581, 93.583-93.584, 93.586-93.587, 93.590-93.605, 93.612-93.613, 93.616-93.618, 93.623, 93.630-93.632, 93.643, 93.645, 93.647-93.648, 93.652, 93.658-93.659, 93.667, 93.669-93.671, 93.674, 93.676, 93.708-93.711, 93.713-93.714, 93.716) Provides services and assistance for 60 programs to needy children and families, administers the new State-Federal welfare program, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, administers the national child support enforcement system, and the Head Start program, provides funds to assist low-income families in paying for child care, and supports State programs to provide for foster care and adoption assistance.

Food and Drug Administration (93.058, 93.103, 93.448-93.449) Assures the safety of foods and cosmetics, and the safety and efficacy of pharmaceuticals, biological products, and medical devices.

Administration for Community Living (93.041-93.045, 93.047-93.048, 93.051-93.054, 93.071-93.072, 93.517-93.518, 93.706, 93.725, 93.734, 93.747) Works with States, localities, the nonprofit sector, businesses and families to help more seniors and people with disabilities have the option to live in their homes and fully participate in their communities. ACLs mission is to maximize health, well-being, and independence for older adults, for people with disabilities across their lifespan, and for their families and their caregivers, by advancing policies, services and supports so that these individuals can live with dignity, make their own choices, and participate fully in society.

Health Resources and Services Administration (93.011, 93.059, 93.107, 93.110, 93.117, 93.124, 93.127, 93.129-93.130, 93.134, 93.145, 93.153, 93.155-93.157, 93.162, 93.165, 93.178, 93.186, 93.191, 93.211-93.212, 93.223-93.224, 93.234, 93.236, 93.241, 93.247, 93.249-93.251, 93.253, 93.255-93.257, 93.259, 93.264-93.267, 93.288, 93.300-93.301, 93.303, 93.342, 93.358-93.359, 93.364-93.365, 93.400-93.412, 93.414-93.417, 93.420, 93.440, 93.501-93.505, 93.509-93.510, 93.512-93.516, 93.522, 93.526-93.528, 93.530, 93.547, 93.549, 93.615, 93.622, 93.700, 93.703, 93.732, 93.822, 93.824, 93.884, 93.887-93.888, 93.908, 93.912-93.914, 93.917-93.918, 93.923-93.926, 93.928, 93.932, 93.964-93.965, 93.969, 93.994) Helps provide health resources for medically underserved populations. HRSA Supports a nationwide network of 643 community and migrant health centers, and 144 primary care programs for the homeless and residents of public housing, serving 8.1 million Americans each year. HRSA also works to build the health care workforce and maintains the National Health Service Corps oversees, the Nation's organ transplantation system, works to decrease infant mortality and improve child health, and provides services to people with AIDS through the Ryan White CARE Act programs.

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (93.225-93.226, 93.715) Supports cross-cutting research on health care systems, health care quality and cost issues, and effectiveness of medical treatments.

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (93.161, 93.204, 93.240, 93.534) Works with States and other Federal agencies to prevent exposure to hazardous substances from waste sites. The agency conducts public health assessments, health studies, surveillance activities, and health education training in communities around waste sites on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List.

Indian Health Service (93.123, 93.164, 93.193, 93.210, 93.228, 93.231, 93.237, 93.284, 93.441-93.445, 93.722, 93.933, 93.954, 93.970-93.972) Supports a network of 37 hospitals, 60 health centers, 3 school health centers, 46 health stations and 34 urban Indian health centers to provide services to nearly 1.5 million American Indians and Alaska Natives of 557 federally recognized tribes.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (93.055-93.056, 93.061-93.070, 93.073-93.074, 93.116, 93.118, 93.135-93.136, 93.184-93.185, 93.197, 93.262, 93.268-93.270, 93.283, 93.338-93.339, 93.507, 93.520-93.521, 93.523-93.524, 93.531, 93.533, 93.535, 93.538-93.542, 93.544, 93.548, 93.606-93.607, 93.712, 93.717, 93.723-93.724, 93.729-93.730, 93.733, 93.735-93.745, 93.749, 93.919, 93.938-93.947, 93.977, 93.988, 93.991) Provides a system of health surveillance to monitor and prevent the outbreak of diseases. With the assistance of States and other partners, CDC guards against international disease transmission, maintains national health statistics and provides for immunization services, and supports research into disease and injury prevention.

National Institutes of Health (93.077, 93.113, 93.121, 93.140, 93.142-93.143, 93.172-93.173, 93.187, 93.209, 93.213, 93.220, 93.232-93.233, 93.242, 93.273, 93.279-93.282, 93.285-93.286, 93.307-93.308, 93.310, 93.313, 93.350-93.352, 93.361, 93.389, 93.393-93.399, 93.701-93.702, 93.704, 93.837-93.839, 93.846-93.847, 93.853, 93.855-93.856, 93.859, 93.865-93.867, 93.879, 93.936, 93.989) Works with 17 separate institutes, serves as the world's premier medical research organization, supporting some 35,000 research projects nationwide in diseases like cancer, Alzheimer's, diabetes, arthritis, heart ailments and AIDS.

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Office of the Secretary (93.001, 93.007-93.008, 93.015-93.016, 93.018, 93.078, 93.088-93.089, 93.239, 93.290, 93.296-93.297, 93.360, 93.451-93.453, 93.500, 93.718-93.719, 93.721, 93.726-93.728, 93.731, 93.889)

SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION (96.001-96.999)

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is the United States government's principal agency for protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services, especially for those who are least able to help themselves. The work of HHS is conducted by the Office of the Secretary and 11 agencies. The agencies perform a wide variety of tasks and services, including research, public health, food and drug safety, grants and other funding, health insurance, and many others. The subdivisions of the Office of the Secretary provide direct support for the Secretary's initiatives.

President's Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition (93.289)

On March 31, 1995, the Social Security Administration (SSA) became an independent agency. SSA administers a national program of contributory social insurance. Employees, employers, and the self-employed pay contributions which are pooled in special trust funds. When earnings cease or are reduced because the worker retires, dies, or becomes disabled, monthly cash benefits are paid to replace part of the earnings the family has lost. Part of the workers contribution goes into a separate hospital insurance trust fund. This fund helps disabled workers, retirees, and their dependents with their hospital bills. They may also elect to receive assistance with medical expenses. This is done by the workers paying a percentage of supplementary medical insurance premiums. The Federal government pays the balance. Together, these two programs are often referred to as "Medicare." Medicare protection is also provided, under certain conditions, to Railroad Retirement beneficiaries based on a disability. The principal functions of SSA include, but are not limited to; research and recommendations oriented to the problems of poverty; health care for the aged, blind, and disabled; long-range planning, design, and development of SSA administrative plans; data processing systems used in establishing and maintaining records essential to its' various programs; statistical measurement and systematic evaluation of its' programs; policy guidance for the administration of the OASDI and SSI programs; and development of programs and materials to assure that Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public have an adequate understanding of the protections, rights, and responsibilities under SSA administered programs. In addition, SSA, through a world-wide organization of ten regional offices, six program service centers, and over 1,300 field offices, guides and directs all aspects of the cash benefit program operations of SSA

The President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports is an advisory committee of volunteer citizens who advise the President through the Secretary of Health and Human Services about physical activity, fitness, and sports in America. Through its programs and partnerships with the public, private and non-profit sectors, the Council serves as a catalyst to promote health, physical activity, fitness, and enjoyment for people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities through participation in physical activity and sports. The twenty Council members are appointed and serve at the pleasure of the President.

Program Support Center (93.291)

A service-for-fee organization, utilizes a pioneering business enterprise approach to provide government support services throughout HHS as well as other Departments and Federal agencies. Administrative operations, financial management and human resources are solution-and customer-oriented, state-of-the-art and highly responsive to customer needs.

DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (97.001-97.999)

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (93.003, 93.104, 93.138, 93.150, 93.243, 93.275-93.276, 93.748, 93.958-93.959, 93.975, 93.982)

Works to improve the quality and availability of substance abuse prevention, addiction treatment, and mental health services.

CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE (94.001-94.999)

On January 23, 2002, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was created through the Homeland Security Act of 2002. The Act provides grants award authority for DHS to award grants, cooperative agreements and other assistance to non-Federal entities in order to assist them with homeland security and disaster preparedness, security, migration and recovery measures. The primary mission of the Department is to prevent terrorist attacks within the Unites States; reduce the vulnerability of the United States to terrorism; minimize damage, and assist in the recovery from terrorist attacks that do occur within the United States; carry out all the functions of entities transferred to the Department, including by acting as focal point regarding natural and manmade crises and emergency planning; ensure that the function of the agencies and subdivisions within the Department that are not related directly to securing the homeland are not diminished or neglected except by a specific explicit Act of Congress; and monitor connection between illegal drug trafficking and terrorism, coordinate efforts to serve such connections, and otherwise contribute to efforts to interdict illegal drug trafficking.

The Corporation for National Service is a federal agency working in partnership with state and local governments and non-profit organizations. The Corporation administers the AmeriCorps national service program, which includes national and state grant programs, AmeriCorps* VISTA and the AmeriCorps*National Civilian Community Corps; the National Senior Service Corps (Foster Grandparents, Senior Companions and the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program); and the Learn and Serve America service-learning program. The

AGENCY INDEX SUMMARY

AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (98.001-98.999)

To promote transformational development in less-developed and selected middle-income countries. Transformational development brings far-reaching, fundamental changes in governance and institutional capacity, human capacity, and economic structure. Such development helps a county sustain further economic and social progress without depending on foreign aid. The goal of achieving transformational development pertains to stable developing countries which have significant need for concessional assistance and are committed to promoting economic freedom, ruling justly, and investing in people.

AGENCY PROGRAM INDEX

This index provides a program list by agency showing the CFDA number and program title. It also distinguishes between programs that provide financial assistance and those that provide non-financial assistance in the form of services and technical assistance. The letter(s) in parentheses following the program title indicates the type of assistance available through that program. The following letter codes are used:

A: Formula Grants
B: Project Grants
C: Direct Payments for Specified Use
D: Direct Payments with Unrestricted Use
E: Direct Loans
F: Guaranteed/Insured Loans
G: Insurance
H: Sale, Exchange, or Donation of Property and Goods
I: Use of Property, Facilities, and Equipment
J: Provision of Specialized Services
K: Advisory Services and Counseling
L: Dissemination of Technical Information
M: Training
N: Investigation of Complaints
0: Federal Employment

Program Description

Financial

Non-Financial

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

XX

X

AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE
10.153 Market News (L)
10.155 Marketing Agreements and Orders (J,K)
10.156 Federal-State Marketing Improvement Program (B)
10.162 Inspection Grading and Standardization (J)
10.163 Market Protection and Promotion (J,K,M)
10.164 Wholesale Farmers and Alternative Market Development (KM)
10.165 Perishable Agricultural Commodities Act (N)
10.167 Transportation Services (KM)
10.168 Farmers' Market Promotion Program (B)
10.170 Specialty Crop Block Grant Program - Farm Bill (B)
10.171 Organic Certification Cost Share Programs (C)

X X X X X

X X X

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