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r Government-sponsored programs, some time early in ade. ost of car companies are focused on both of these ap ere is a very robust partnership between Government to get them on the road. ly add that there is also a very intense race across the ket share the Japanese, the Germans, U.S. manufac ring that these high-mileage, low-polluting cars are ad we want to make sure that U.S. workers, U.S. comhe lion's share of that new market as it emerges. BERNICE JOHNSON of Texas. Thank you very much CALVERT. Thank you. ).

APPENDIX 1: Materials Submitted for the Record

TAX INCENTIVES FOR COAL LO. One last question; Dr. Lane, you mentioned in y about moving us away from fossil fuels as one af energy policy in the 21st century. You also point out ndency on imported oil from overseas. e-wouldn't it make sense for us, as a Government, he partnership that we talked about earlier and to entives in order to have utilities use the abundanæ have in the United States today? ell, Mr. Costello, I think that there is a place for 1 place for tax incentives. The Climate Change Teche is a broad initiative; it has all aspects of this. We bout the situation with coal. The report that I nt I put out by PCAST on energy R&D makes this ly; that we are going to need coal, but we are going hnologies, not the ones we currently know about a place where we are really going to have to invest inologies. The cost of that R&D is high enough so tural for industry to do that

on its own, and that ships play a very important role

We are short inuing). As part of this. We are short of time, but I would just encourage dministration to aggressively pursue a large mote tives and the partnership with the private sector 8 to use coal. k you, sir. ERT. Thank the gentlemen, and I thank our wit

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This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The intormation contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified

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This report was prepared by the staff of the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Informat Administration. General questions concerning the report can be directed to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-22 mhutzlereia.doe.gov). Director of the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting: Susan H. Holte (2027586-4€ shollebeia.doe.gov). Director of the Demand and Integration Division: James M. Kendell (202/586-9€ jikendell@eia.doe.gov). Director of the Oil and Gas Division; Scott B. Sitzer (202/586-2308, ssitzer@eia.doe.go Director of the Coal and Electric Power Division; and Andy S. Kydes (202/586-2222. akydes®eia.doe.gov). Ser Modeling Analyst. Specific questions about the report may be directed to the following analysts:

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Preface

In February 1999, the Administration sent its fiscal year 2000 budget request to the U.S. Congress. It includes more than $4 billion in programs related to climate change. Nearly $1.8 billion of the funding is proposed for tax incentives, research and development, and other spending for the Climate Change Technology Initiative (CCTI). CCTI includes tax credits to serve as incentives for energy efficiency improvements and renewable technologies for buildings. light-duty vehicles, industry, and electricity generation. Other funding covers research, development, and deployment for energy-efficient and renewable technologies, more efficient generating technologies, and carbon sequestration research.

The analysis in this report was undertaken at the request of the Committee on Science of the U.S. House of Representatives. In its request, the Committee asked the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to analyze the impact of specific policies on the reduction of carbon emissions and their impact on U.S. energy use and prices .. in the 2008-2012 time frame," as noted in the first letter in the Appendix. The second letter from the Committee specified that EIA "analyze the impact of the President's Climate Change Technology Initiative, as defined for the 2000 budget, on reducing carbon emissions from the levels forecast in the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 reference case."

The projections and quantitative analysis in this report were conducted primarily using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). an energy economy model of U.S. energy markets designed, developed, and maintained by EIA, which is used each year to provide the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook. Chapter 1 of this report provides background discussion of CCTI and the methodology of the analysis. Chapters 2. 3. and 4, respectively. analyze the impacts of the tax credits; research, development, and deployment programs, and funding for accelerated appliance standards proposed in CCTI.

The legislation that established EIA in 1977 vested the organization with an element of statutory independence. EIA does not take position on policy questions. It is the responsibility of EIA to provide timely, high quality information and to perform objective, credible analyses in support of the deliberations of both public and private decisionmakers. This report does not purport to represent the official position of the U.S. Department of Energy or the Administration.

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report was undertaken at the request of the Committee on Science of the US House si = request, the Committee asked the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to analyze to cles on the reduction of carbon emissions and their impact on U.S. energy use and prices. frame." as noted in the first letter in the Appendix. The second letter from the Commuter

alyze the impact of the President's Climate Change Technology Initiative, as defined for Eng carbon emissions from the levels forecast in the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 reference care

quantitative analysis in this report were conducted primarily using the National Expo MS), an energy economy model of U.S. energy markets designed, developed, and maintained each year

to provide the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook Chapter 1 of this regar discussion of CCTI and the methodology of the analysis. Chapters 2, 3, and 4, respectives he tax credits; research, development, and deployment programs, and funding for accelerare oposed in CCTI.

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2 CCTI Tax Initiatives

Introduction
Buildings
Tax Credits for Energy-Efficient Building Equipment

Background

Results
Tax Credits for Energy-Efficient New Homes

Background

Methodology and Results
Tax Credits for Rooftop Solar Equipment

Background

Results
Industry

Background
Tax Credit for Combined Heat and Power
Methodology
Results
Transportation

Background
Tax Credits for Electric, Electric Hybrid, and Fuel Cell Vehicles
Analytical Approach

Results and Discussion
Renewable Electricity Generation

Background.
Climate Change Technology Initiative
Methodology
Results

Blomass

Wind
Conclusion

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blished EIA in 1977 vested the organization with an element of statutory independence EA n policy questions. It is the responsibility of EIA to provide timely, high quality information E, credible analyses in support of the deliberations of both public and private decisionmakes purport to represent the official position of the U.S. Department of Energy or the

Energy Information Ademinketration I Analysis of the Climate Change Technology Initiative

formation Administration / Analysis of the Climate Change Technology Initiative

1

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