The Home and foreign review [formerly The Rambler]., Volume 2

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Page 7 - The seat of judicial authority is, indeed, locally here, in the belligerent country, according to the known law and practice of nations ; but the law itself has no locality. It is the duty of the person who sits here to determine this question exactly as he would determine the same question if sitting at Stockholm...
Page 275 - Lo ! he comes with clouds descending, Once for favoured sinners slain ! Thousand thousand saints, attending, Swell the triumph of his train ; Hallelujah ! God appears on earth to reign. 2 Every eye shall now behold him, Robed in dreadful majesty ; Those who set at nought and sold him, Pierced and nailed him to the tree, Deeply wailing, Shall the true Messiah see.
Page 117 - On parent knees, a naked new-born child Weeping thou sat'st while all around thee smiled ; So live, that sinking in thy last long sleep, Calm thou mayst smile, while all around thee weep.
Page 7 - ... locality. It is the duty of the person who sits here to determine this question exactly as he would determine the same question if sitting at Stockholm ; to assert no pretensions on the part of Great Britain which he would not allow to Sweden in the same circumstances, and to impose no duties on Sweden, as a neutral country, which he would not admit to belong to Great Britain in the same character.
Page 26 - He maintains — that the right of visiting and searching merchant ships upon the high seas, whatever be the ships, whatever be the cargoes, whatever be the destinations, is an incontestable right of the lawfully commissioned cruisers of a belligerent nation.
Page 531 - A wide plain, where the broadening Floss hurries on between its green banks to the sea, and the loving tide, rushing to meet it, checks its passage with an impetuous embrace.
Page 5 - ... by stationing a number of ships and forming as it were an arch of circumvallation around the mouth of the prohibited port. There, if the arch fails in any one part, the blockade itself fails altogether...
Page 105 - The king to Oxford sent his troop of horse, For Tories own no argument but force; With equal care to Cambridge books he sent, For Whigs allow no force but argument.
Page 104 - Our royal master saw, with heedful eyes, The wants of his two universities : Troops he to Oxford sent, as knowing why That learned body wanted loyalty : But books to Cambridge gave, as, well discerning, That that right loyal body wanted learning.
Page 101 - Here lies our Sovereign Lord the King, Whose word no man relies on ; Who never said a foolish thing, And never did a wise one.

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