African religions & philosophy

Front Cover
Praeger, 1969 - 290 pages
The eminent theologian provides a comparative study of the religious rituals, beliefs, and ceremonies of African tribes throughout the continent

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User Review  - BryanThomasS - LibraryThing

The classic on the topic, written by an African. Very in depth and informative and insightful. Covers a lot of ground and compares the commonalities, while also noting differences. Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
THE STUDY OF AFRICAN RELIGIONS AND PHILOSOPHY
8
THE CONCEPT OF TIME AS A KEY TO THE UNDER
19
Copyright

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About the author (1969)

John Mbiti was born in Kitui, Kenya, and received his education in Africa and abroad. Trained as an Anglican priest, he went on to be both professor and parish minister in Switzerland, where he later settled. As a philosopher and Christian theologian, Mbiti became one of the early African authorities on African religions. Using his philosophical skills, he focuses on deriving a representation of a coherent philosophical worldview from the indigenous traditions. One of his projects, for example, has been to articulate a view of temporality in indigenous African thought different from that of the modern West. Mbiti's goal, however, has not been simply to develop ethnophilosophical analyses. Concerned with the future of Africa, he has argued that certain traditional African values should be preserved, but also---for the sake of modernization and reform---that other values (based often in Christianity) should be assimilated into the culture. This latter orientation has made him the subject of some controversy among other African philosophers.

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